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Articles by Howard M. Fillit
Total Records ( 2 ) for Howard M. Fillit
  Christopher D. Walentas , Diana W. Shineman , Antony R. Horton , Bradley F. Boeve and Howard M. Fillit
  Background To better understand the status of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) research, and identify opportunities to accelerate translational research, we analyzed international funding for FTD and related dementias between 1998 and 2008. Methods Search terms were compiled to define the clinical spectrum of FTD and all known mechanisms. Funders were asked to return grants that contained these search terms in the title or abstract. Grants were classified according to the most reasonably achieved stated aim using a classification scheme of research activities that was developed to map grants along the continuum from basic research to clinical trials of treatments. Results This analysis captured 613 grants ($432,167,275), from 19 private and public funders from 7 countries and the European Union. National Institutes of Health contributed $360 million (MM), 53% of grants and 83% of total funding. Foundations contributed $43 MM, 35% of grants and 10% of total funding, an increase in recent years. A total of $319 MM (74%, funding) went toward basic research, of which 10% was dedicated to preclinical treatment development, clinical treatment evaluation, and developing detection, diagnostic, and imaging technologies and reagents. Conclusions FTD received moderate funding over the past decade, which has decreased almost five-fold during this period. A sizable proportion of FTD funding supported mechanisms shared with Alzheimer‘s disease. Few programs advanced past validating target models and into drug discovery and preclinical development, indicating that the knowledge gained from recent research has still not advanced into treatment development. Quantitative analysis of funding highlighted under-resourced areas as well as redundant efforts, enabling a more strategic approach toward advancing FTD drug discovery and development.
  Pei-Jung Lin , Howard M. Fillit , Howard M. Fillit and Peter J. Neumann
  Background Individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders (ADRD) have more frequent hospitalizations than individuals without ADRD, and some of these admissions may be preventable with proactive outpatient care. Methods This study was a cross-sectional analysis of Medicare claims data from 195,024 fee-for-service ADRD beneficiaries aged ≥65 years and an equal number of matched non-ADRD controls drawn from the 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries in 2007–2008. We analyzed the proportion of patients with potentially avoidable hospitalizations (PAHs, as defined by the Medicare Ambulatory Care Indicators for the Elderly) and used logistic regression to examine patient characteristics associated with PAHs. We used paired t tests to compare Medicare expenditures by ADRD status, stratified by whether there were PAHs related to a particular condition. Results Compared with matched non-ADRD subjects, Medicare beneficiaries with ADRD were significantly more likely to have PAHs for diabetes short-term complications (OR = 1.43; 95% CI 1.31–1.57), diabetes long-term complications (OR = 1.08; 95% CI = 1.02–1.14), and hypertension (OR = 1.22; 95% CI 1.08–1.38), but less likely to have PAHs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma (OR = 0.85; 95% CI 0.82–0.87) and heart failure (OR = 0.89; 95% CI 0.86–0.92). Risks of PAHs increased significantly with comorbidity burden. Among beneficiaries with a PAH, total Medicare expenditures were significantly higher for those subjects who also had ADRD. Conclusion Medicare beneficiaries with ADRD were at a higher risk of PAHs for certain uncontrolled comorbidities and incurred higher Medicare expenditures compared with matched controls without dementia. ADRD appears to make the management of some comorbidities more difficult and expensive. Ideally, ADRD programs should involve care management targeting high-risk patients with multiple chronic conditions.
 
 
 
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