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Articles by H.M. Kazeem
Total Records ( 4 ) for H.M. Kazeem
  B.Y. Kaltungo , S.N.A. Saidu , A.K.B. Sackey and H.M. Kazeem
  Most brucellosis related studies in Nigeria is mainly in the cattle population. Brucellosis in small ruminants may be of greater public health concern in view of the socio-economic role of small ruminants in Nigeria. This study was carried out to generate a base-line data of brucellosis in sheep and goats in Kaduna North Senatorial District of Kaduna State, Nigeria. In this study, 72 and 122 milk samples were collected from apparently healthy sheep and goats, respectively within the months of April- May. Milk samples were collected from lactating sheep and goats and subjected to the Milk Ring Test (MRT). From the milk samples collected 13(18.1%) and 32(26.2%) were positive for Brucella antibodies. Though the prevalence in goats was higher compared to sheep but this was not statistically significant (p>0.05). A high prevalence of Brucella antibodies in the milk of sheep and goats necessitates government intervention for an effective and holistic control of brucellosis in Nigeria. High risk groups and the general public should further be enlightened on the health hazards of the disease and the risk of interspecies transmission of brucellosis.
  L. Saidu , A.M. Wakawa , P.A. Abdu , D.F. Adene , H.M. Kazeem , K.C. Ladan , M. Abdu , R.B. Miko , M.Y. Fatihu , J. Adamu and P.H. Mamman
  Cases of Avian Influenza (AI) outbreaks reported and confirmed were extracted from the records of control committees on AI in Kano and Katsina States, Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Pan-African Control of Epizootics (PACE) project office at Kaduna. Information on Al outbreaks in Jigawa State were obtained through a questionnaire. A total of 480,378 birds were lost in 34 outbreaks in the four states under study between the period of January and March 2006. Chickens accounted for more than 99% of all the birds affected followed by guinea fowls and turkeys. More than 60% of the birds affected were adults. The concentrations of poultry farms in Kano metropolis particularly along Gwarzo road where the epidemic was first noticed might have been responsible for the fast spread of the disease within Kano metropolis. It is a common practice to find geese, muscovey ducks and turkeys in one farm in the study area. This practice makes the chickens and turkeys more prone to the disease. From the tract of outbreaks It is possible that the disease spread from Jigawa State to Kano state and from Kano State to other States in the study area and other parts of the country through trade in live birds and poultry by products. For proper diagnosis and control of AI in Nigeria, poultry farmers should be educated on the necessity for prompt disease reporting to veterinarians and appropriate authorities.
  I.J. Mbuko , W.I. Musa , S. Ibrahim , L. Sa`idu , P.A. Abdu , S.B. Oladele and H.M. Kazeem
  A five year retrospective study (2004-2008) of the prevalence of Gumboro disease (infectious bursal disease, IBD) and other poultry disease diagnosed at the poultry unit of the Ahmadu Bello University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (ABUVTH), Zaria, Kaduna Nigeria was conducted. A prevalence of 7.26% (107 cases) was recorded out of 1473 cases of poultry disease. Gumboro disease occurred throughout the year in Zaria with a high incidence during the festival periods (July-September, October-December and January-March). The outbreaks of IBD were observed to be 1.3 times more likely to occur in pre-rainy season (April-June). Improved breeds of chickens were 5.8 times more likely to suffer from IBD than free range local chickens with broilers being 5.7 times more likely to suffer from the disease than other type of birds followed by layers kept together with cockerels. The prevalence of IBD is influenced by age of birds with an increase in the likelihood of IBD occurring within the age range of 3-5 week. Birds at 5 weeks old were at highest risk. Chickens with one vaccination history against IBD were 8.2 times more likely to suffer from the disease compared to non-vaccinated chickens. This study recommends that poultry farmers should be encourage to improve on farm biosecurity and ensure that their birds are vaccinated at least twice, before 3 and 5 weeks of age (at 1 and 3 or 2 and 4 weeks of age).
  J.S. Dalis , H.M. Kazeem , A.A. Makinde , M.Y. Fatihu and G.Y. Dashe
  A study was carried out to determine bacteria associated with pathology of bovine dermatophilosis in north central Nigeria. Skin samples obtained from 211 cattle with skin lesions suspected to be dermatophilosis were processed for bacteriology and histopathology. One hundred and sixty seven (79.1%) samples were positive for Dermatophilus congolensis, while 44 (20.9%) were negative. Both D. congolensis positive and negative samples were processed for isolation of other bacteria and the data was analyzed using χ2-test. Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus sp., Corynebacterium sp., Escherichia coli, Proteus and Pseudomonas sp. were isolated from both D. congolensis positive and D. congolensis negative scabs. However, the rate of recovery of S. aureus from D. congolensis positive cattle was significantly (p<0.05) higher than the rate of its recovery from D. congolensis negative cattle. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the occurrence of the other isolates in D. congolensis positive and negative cattle. Histopathology revealed hyperplasia of the epidermis, parakeratosis, necrosis, cellular infiltration of the hair follicles and papillary dermis, diffuse cellular infiltration of the reticular dermis and folliculitis were also observed in some sections. It was concluded that the histopathological lesions observed could be due to D. congolensis complicated by secondary bacterial infection. The need to investigate the role of bacteria particularly that of S. aureus in the development of bovine dermatophilosis was emphasized.
 
 
 
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