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Articles by H. M. Dallosso
Total Records ( 2 ) for H. M. Dallosso
  K. Khunti , T. C. Skinner , S Heller , M. E Carey , H. M. Dallosso and M. J Davies
  Aims  To describe the characteristics of newly diagnosed people with Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and compare these with published studies.

Methods  Baseline data of participants recruited to the DESMOND randomized controlled trial conducted in 13 sites across England and Scotland were used. Biomedical measures and questionnaires on psychological characteristics were collected within 4 weeks of diagnosis.

Results  Of 1109 participants referred, 824 consented to participate (74.3%). Mean (± sd) age was 59.5 ± 12 years and 54.9% were male. Mean HbA1c was 8.1 ± 2.1% and did not differ by gender. Mean body mass index (BMI) was significantly higher in women (33.7 vs. 31.3 kg/m2; P < 0.001); 69% of women and 54% of men were obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2). Total cholesterol was significantly higher in women (5.6 vs. 5.2 mmol/l; P < 0.001). Overall, 14.7% reported smoking. Percentages reporting recommended levels of vigorous activity (≥ 3 times/week) and moderate activity (≥ 5 times/week) were 10.6 and 16.0%, respectively, and were lower in women. Specific illness beliefs included 73% being unclear about symptoms and only 54% believing diabetes is a serious condition. Symptoms indicative of depression were reported by significantly more women than men (16.1% vs. 8.2%; P = 0.001).

Conclusion  Data from this large and representative cohort of newly diagnosed people with T2DM show that many have modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Comparison with the literature suggests that the profile of the newly diagnosed may be changing, with lower HbA1c and higher prevalence of obesity. Many expressed beliefs about and poor understanding of their diabetes that need to be addressed in order for them to engage in effective self-management.

  T. C. Skinner , M. E. Carey , S. Cradock , H. M. Dallosso , H. Daly , M. J. Davies , Y. Doherty , S. Heller , K. Khunti and L. Oliver
  Aims  To describe the course of depressive symptoms during the first year after diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes.

Methods Post hoc analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of self-management education for 824 individuals newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Participants completed the Depression scale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale after diagnosis and at 4, 8 and 12 months follow-up. Participants also completed the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale at 8 and 12 months follow-up. We present descriptive statistics on prevalence and persistence of depressive symptoms. Logistic regression is used to predict possible depression cases, and multiple regression to predict depressive symptomatology.

Results  The prevalence of depressive symptoms in individuals recently diagnosed with diabetes (18-22% over the year) was not significantly different from normative data for the general population (12%) in the UK. Over 20% of participants indicated some degrees of depressive symptoms over the first year of living with Type 2 diabetes; these were mostly transient episodes, with 5% (1% severe) reporting having depressive symptoms throughout the year. At 12 months post diagnosis, after controlling for baseline depressive symptoms, diabetes-specific emotional distress was predictive of depressive symptomatology.

Conclusions  The increased prevalence of depressive symptoms in diabetes is not manifest until at least 1 year post diagnosis in this cohort. However, there are a significant number of people with persistent depressive symptoms in the early stages of diabetes, and diabetes-specific distress may be contributing to subsequent development of depressive symptoms in people with Type 2 diabetes.

 
 
 
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