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Articles by H. Daly
Total Records ( 2 ) for H. Daly
  T. C. Skinner , M. E. Carey , S. Cradock , H. M. Dallosso , H. Daly , M. J. Davies , Y. Doherty , S. Heller , K. Khunti and L. Oliver
 

Aims  To determine whether differences in the amount of time educators talk during a self-management education programme relate to the degree of change in participants` reported beliefs about diabetes.

Method  Educators trained to be facilitative and non-didactic in their approach were observed delivering the DESMOND self-management programme for individuals newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Observers used 10-s event coding to estimate the amount of time educators spoke during different sessions in the programme. Facilitative as opposed to didactic delivery was indicated by targets for levels of educator talk set for each session. Targets were based on earlier pilot work. Using the revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (IPQ-R) and the Diabetes Illness Representations Questionnaire (DIRQ), participants completed measures of: perceived duration of diabetes (timeline IPQ-R), understanding of diabetes (coherence IPQ-R), personal responsibility for influencing diabetes (personal responsibility IPQ-R), seriousness of diabetes (seriousness DIRQ) and impact on daily life (impact DIRQ), before and after the education programme.

Results  Where data from the event coding indicated educators were talking less and meeting targets for being less didactic, a greater change in reported illness beliefs of participants was seen. However, educators struggled to meet targets for most sessions of the programme.

Conclusion  The amount of time educators talk in a self-management programme may provide a practical marker for the effectiveness of the education process, with less educator talk denoting a more facilitative/less didactic approach. This finding has informed subsequent improvements to a comprehensive quality development framework, acknowledging that educators need ongoing support to facilitate change to their normal educational style.

  T. C. Skinner , M. E. Carey , S. Cradock , H. M. Dallosso , H. Daly , M. J. Davies , Y. Doherty , S. Heller , K. Khunti and L. Oliver
  Aims  To describe the course of depressive symptoms during the first year after diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes.

Methods Post hoc analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of self-management education for 824 individuals newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Participants completed the Depression scale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale after diagnosis and at 4, 8 and 12 months follow-up. Participants also completed the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale at 8 and 12 months follow-up. We present descriptive statistics on prevalence and persistence of depressive symptoms. Logistic regression is used to predict possible depression cases, and multiple regression to predict depressive symptomatology.

Results  The prevalence of depressive symptoms in individuals recently diagnosed with diabetes (18-22% over the year) was not significantly different from normative data for the general population (12%) in the UK. Over 20% of participants indicated some degrees of depressive symptoms over the first year of living with Type 2 diabetes; these were mostly transient episodes, with 5% (1% severe) reporting having depressive symptoms throughout the year. At 12 months post diagnosis, after controlling for baseline depressive symptoms, diabetes-specific emotional distress was predictive of depressive symptomatology.

Conclusions  The increased prevalence of depressive symptoms in diabetes is not manifest until at least 1 year post diagnosis in this cohort. However, there are a significant number of people with persistent depressive symptoms in the early stages of diabetes, and diabetes-specific distress may be contributing to subsequent development of depressive symptoms in people with Type 2 diabetes.

 
 
 
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