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Articles by H Yang
Total Records ( 17 ) for H Yang
  J Gu , D Sun , Q Zheng , X Wang , H Yang , J Miao , J Jiang and W. Wei
 

Elongator complex has been associated with hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II and is known to play critical roles in transcriptional elongation, as well as in tRNA modification and exocytosis. However, the specific mechanism of how human Elongator complex regulates cell growth and cell cycle remains unclear. To investigate the composition of human Elongator complex and its effects on cell growth, 293T cells were established that stably overexpressed Flag-Elp3 and Flag-Elp4. By using anti-Flag M2 antibody-bound resin, a core Elongator complex was purified from cells that stably overexpressed Flag-Elp3. No Elongator complex was purified from cells stably transfected with pFlagCMV4-Elp4. Interestingly, the cell growth was inhibited in 293T cells transfected with pFlagCMV4-Elp3. Flow cytometry analysis showed that most of the cells stably overexpressing Flag-Elp3 were found in G1 stage, indicating a role of the core Elongator in the G1 checkpoint for the regulation of cell cycle. We observed increased basal transcription and remarkably enhanced transcription stimulated by VP16 in 293T cells overexpressing Flag-Elp3. The transcription could also be synergistically activated by overexpressing both Elp3 and Elp4. Taken together, our results suggested that the core Elongator complex formed by Elp1, Elp2, and Elp3 was rather stable, whereas Elp4, Elp5, and Elp6 might loosely contact and work together with the core Elongator to regulate cell functions.

  L Zhang , X Jia , X Peng , Q Ou , Z Zhang , C Qiu , Y Yao , F Shen , H Yang , F Ma , J Wang and Z. Yuan
 

This paper presents an liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabonomic platform that combined the discovery of differential metabolites through principal component analysis (PCA) with the verification by selective multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). These methods were applied to analyze plasma samples from liver disease patients and healthy donors. LC–MS raw data (about 1000 compounds), from the plasma of liver failure patients (n = 26) and healthy controls (n = 16), were analyzed through the PCA method and a pattern recognition profile that had significant difference between liver failure patients and healthy controls (P < 0.05) was established. The profile was verified in 165 clinical subjects. The specificity and sensitivity of this model in predicting liver failure were 94.3 and 100.0%, respectively. The differential ions with m/z of 414.5, 432.0, 520.5, and 775.0 were verified to be consistent with the results from PCA by MRM mode in 40 clinical samples, and were proved not to be caused by the medicines taken by patients through rat model experiments. The compound with m/z of 520.5 was identified to be 1-Linoleoylglycerophosphocholine or 1-Linoleoylphosphatidylcholine through exact mass measurements performed using Ion Trap–Time-of-Flight MS and METLIN Metabolite Database search. In all, it was the first time to integrate metabonomic study and MRM relative quantification of differential peaks in a large number of clinical samples. Thereafter, a rat model was used to exclude drug effects on the abundance of differential ion peaks. 1-Linoleoylglycerophosphocholine or 1-Linoleoylphosphatidylcholine, a potential biomarker, was identified. The LC/MS-based metabonomic platform could be a powerful tool for the metabonomic screening of plasma biomarkers.

  X Wu , M. R Spitz , J. J Lee , S. M Lippman , Y Ye , H Yang , F. R Khuri , E Kim , J Gu , R Lotan and W. K. Hong
 

This study was aimed to identify novel susceptibility variants for second primary tumor (SPT) or recurrence in curatively treated early-stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients.

We constructed a custom chip containing a comprehensive panel of 9,645 chromosomal and mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) representing 998 cancer-related genes selected by a systematic prioritization schema. Using this chip, we genotyped 150 early-stage HNSCC patients with and 300 matched patients without SPT/recurrence from a prospectively conducted randomized trial and assessed the association of these SNPs with risk of SPT/recurrence.

Individually, six chromosomal SNPs and seven mitochondrial SNPs were significantly associated with risk of SPT/recurrence after adjustment for multiple comparisons. A strong gene-dosage effect was observed when these SNPs were combined, as evidenced by a progressively increasing SPT/recurrence risk as the number of unfavorable genotypes increased (P for trend < 1.00 x 10–20). Several polygenic analyses suggest an important role of interconnected functional network and gene-gene interaction in modulating SPT/recurrence. Furthermore, incorporation of these genetic markers into a multivariate model improved significantly the discriminatory ability over the models containing only clinical and epidemiologic variables.

This is the first large-scale systematic evaluation of germ-line genetic variants for their roles in HNSCC SPT/recurrence. The study identified several promising susceptibility loci and showed the cumulative effect of multiple risk loci in HNSCC SPT/recurrence. Furthermore, this study underscores the importance of incorporating germ-line genetic variation data with clinical and risk factor data in constructing prediction models for clinical outcomes.

  M Chen , M. A. T Hildebrandt , J Clague , A. M Kamat , A Picornell , J Chang , X Zhang , J Izzo , H Yang , J Lin , J Gu , S Chanock , M Kogevinas , N Rothman , D. T Silverman , M Garcia Closas , H. B Grossman , C. P Dinney , N Malats and X. Wu
 

Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway genetic variations may affect bladder cancer risk and clinical outcomes. Therefore, we genotyped 177 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 11 Shh pathway genes in a study including 803 bladder cancer cases and 803 controls. We assessed SNP associations with cancer risk and clinical outcomes in 419 cases of non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and 318 cases of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (MiMBC). Only three SNPs (GLI3 rs3823720, rs3735361, and rs10951671) reached nominal significance in association with risk (P ≤ 0.05), which became nonsignificant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Nine SNPs reached a nominally significant individual association with recurrence of NMIBC in patients who received transurethral resection (TUR) only (P ≤ 0.05), of which two (SHH rs1233560 and GLI2 rs11685068) were replicated independently in 356 TUR-only NMIBC patients, with P values of 1.0 x 10–3 (SHH rs1233560) and 1.3 x 10–3 (GLI2 rs11685068). Nine SNPs also reached a nominally significant individual association with clinical outcome of NMIBC patients who received Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG; P ≤ 0.05), of which two, the independent GLI3 variants rs6463089 and rs3801192, remained significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons (P = 2 x 10–4 and 9 x 10–4, respectively). The wild-type genotype of either of these SNPs was associated with a lower recurrence rate and longer recurrence-free survival (versus the variants). Although three SNPs (GLI2 rs735557, GLI2 rs4848632, and SHH rs208684) showed nominal significance in association with overall survival in MiMBC patients (P ≤ 0.05), none remained significant after multiple-comparison adjustments. Germ-line genetic variations in the Shh pathway predicted clinical outcomes of TUR and BCG for NMIBC patients. Cancer Prev Res; 3(10); 1235–45. ©2010 AACR.

  M Chen , A Cassidy , J Gu , G. L Delclos , F Zhen , H Yang , M. A.T Hildebrandt , J Lin , Y Ye , R. M Chamberlain , C. P Dinney and X. Wu
 

Genetic variations in phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may affect critical cellular functions and increase an individual's cancer risk. We systematically evaluate 231 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 19 genes in the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway as predictors of bladder cancer risk. In individual SNP analysis, four SNPs in regulatory associated protein of mTOR (RAPTOR) remained significant after correcting for multiple testing: rs11653499 [odds ratio (OR): 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24–2.60, P = 0.002], rs7211818 (OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.35–3.36, P = 0.001), rs7212142 (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19–2.07, P = 0.002) and rs9674559 (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.31–3.21, P = 0.002), among which rs7211818 and rs9674559 are within the same haplotype block. In haplotype analysis, compared with the most common haplotypes, haplotype containing the rs7212142 wild-type allele showed a protective effect of bladder cancer (OR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70–0.97). In contrast, the haplotype containing the rs7211818 variant allele showed a 1.32-fold elevated bladder cancer risk (95% CI: 1.09–1.60). In combined analysis of three independent significant RAPTOR SNPs (rs11653499, rs7211818 and rs7212142), a significant trend was observed for increased risk with an increase in the number of unfavorable genotypes (P for trend <0.001). Compared with the subjects without any of the unfavorable genotypes, those carrying all three unfavorable genotypes showed a 2.22-fold (95% CI: 1.33–3.71) increased bladder cancer risk. This is the first study to evaluate the role of germ line genetic variations in PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway as cancer susceptibility factors that will help us identify high-risk individuals for bladder cancer.

  H Yang , S. H Park , H. J Choi and Y. Moon
 

Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2) is a critical convergence point of the integrated stress response (ISR), which supports eukaryotic cellular adaptation to diverse stressful conditions, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress by global protein translational arrest and induction of numerous stress-triggered cytoprotective genes. Challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) leads to ER perturbation that may sensitize cancer cells to drug-induced apoptosis. Here, we examined the ER stress signals in the context of NSAID exposure and the induction of the critical tumor suppressor, NSAID-activated gene 1 (NAG-1), in the epithelial cancer cells. Sulindac sulfide, the active sulindac metabolite, was shown to trigger the ISRs via eIF2 kinase such as RNA-dependent protein kinase-related endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). ER stress markers such as glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and activating transcription factor (ATF)-3 were enhanced by sulindac sulfide in colon cancer cells. In these cells, the PERK-activated ATF3–CHOP signaling pathway mediated the gene expression of pro-apoptotic NAG-1- and NSAID-induced apoptosis. In contrast, PKR protein was not involved in the signaling cascade for the gene expression of CHOP-linked NAG-1. Instead, PKR mediated activation of pro-survival extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway, which was enhanced by NAG-1 suppression in response to cytotoxic sulindac sulfide exposure. PKR–ERK1/2 activation may thus contribute to the defensive cellular response to cytotoxic NSAIDs while drug-mediated ER stress triggers the pro-apoptotic NAG-1 production in human colon cancer cells.

  J Wang , S. M Lippman , J. J Lee , H Yang , F. R Khuri , E Kim , J Lin , D. W Chang , R Lotan , W. K Hong and X. Wu
 

Curatively treated patients with early-stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are at high risks for second primary tumor (SPT) and recurrence. The regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) is important in essential signaling transduction and cellular activities. We hypothesize that genetic variations of RGS may modulate the risk of SPT/recurrence in patients with early-stage HNSCC. In a nested case–control study, we evaluated 98 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 17 RGS genes for the risk of SPT/recurrence among 450 HNSCC patients. Eight SNPs showed significant associations with the risk of SPT/recurrence, with the most significant one of rs2179653, which is located in the 5'-flanking region of RGS2 gene. Under a recessive genetic model, the homozygous variant genotype of this SNP was associated with 2.95-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.52–5.74] increased risk of SPT/recurrence. This association remained significant after the adjustment for multiple comparisons. Cumulative effects analysis revealed that the risk increased significantly with the increasing numbers of unfavorable genotypes. Compared with subjects carrying 0–2 unfavorable genotypes, the hazard ratios (95% CIs) for those carrying 3 or 4+ were 1.73 (1.10–2.70) and 3.05 (1.92–4.83), respectively. Furthermore, survival tree analysis revealed potential higher order gene–gene interactions and indicated different outcomes based on distinct genotype profiles. Genetic variations of RGS genes may modulate the susceptibility to SPT/recurrence in early-stage HNSCC patients individually and cumulatively. Our results stressed the importance of taking a polygenic approach to evaluate the cumulative and interaction effects of genetic variations in the prediction of cancer risk and prognosis.

  X Zhang , H Yang , J. J Lee , E Kim , S. M Lippman , F. R Khuri , M. R Spitz , R Lotan , W. K Hong and X. Wu
 

Second primary tumor (SPT) and/or recurrence negatively impact the prognosis of patients with curatively treated early-stage head and neck cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in cancer development. We explored whether the variations of miRNA-related pathway were associated with the risk of SPT/recurrence in patients with early-stage head and neck cancer. This study includes 150 early-stage head and neck cancer patients with SPT/recurrence and 300 patients without SPT/recurrence. Two hundred and thirty-five tagging and potentially functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped from eight miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and 135 miRNA-targeted genes. Eighteen miRNA-related SNPs were significantly associated with the risk of SPT/recurrence. The most significant SNP was rs3747238, a miRNA-binding site SNP in SMC1B. The variant homozygous genotype of this SNP was associated with a 1.74-fold increased risk [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19–2.54; P = 0.004]. Cumulative effect analysis showed joint effects for the number of unfavorable genotype in patients. Survival tree analysis further identified the high-order gene–gene interactions and categorized the study subjects into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Patients in the high-risk group had a 4.84-fold increased risk (95% CI: 3.11–7.51; P = 2.45 x 10–12) and a shorter event-free median survival time of 37.9 months (log rank P = 2.28 x 10–13). Our results suggested that miRNA-related genetic polymorphisms may be used individually and jointly to predict the risk of SPT/recurrence of early-stage head and neck cancer patients.

  P Wang , J Liu , Y Li , S Wu , J Luo , H Yang , R Subbiah , J Chatham , O Zhelyabovska and Q. Yang
 

Rationale: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) (, , and /β) are nuclear hormone receptors and ligand-activated transcription factors that serve as key determinants of myocardial fatty acid metabolism. Long-term cardiomyocyte-restricted PPAR deficiency in mice leads to depressed myocardial fatty acid oxidation, bioenergetics, and premature death with lipotoxic cardiomyopathy.

Objective: To explore the essential role of PPAR in the adult heart.

Methods and Results: We investigated the consequences of inducible short-term PPAR knockout in the adult mouse heart. In addition to a substantial transcriptional downregulation of lipid metabolic proteins, short-term PPAR knockout in the adult mouse heart attenuated cardiac expression of both Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and manganese superoxide dismutase, leading to increased oxidative damage to the heart. Moreover, expression of key mitochondrial biogenesis determinants such as PPAR coactivator-1 were substantially decreased in the short-term PPAR deficient heart, concomitant with a decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Rates of palmitate and glucose oxidation were markedly depressed in cardiomyocytes of PPAR knockout hearts. Consequently, PPAR deficiency in the adult heart led to depressed cardiac performance and cardiac hypertrophy.

Conclusions: PPAR is an essential regulator of cardiac mitochondrial protection and biogenesis and PPAR activation can be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac disorders.

  C Zhang , L Fu , J Fu , L Hu , H Yang , T. H Rong , Y Li , H Liu , S. B Fu , Y. X Zeng and X. Y. Guan
 

Purpose: Tumor fibroblasts (TF) have been suggested to play an essential role in the complex process of tumor-stroma interactions and tumorigenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the specific role of TF in the esophageal cancer microenvironment.

Experimental Design: An Affymetrix expression microarray was used to compare gene expression profiles between six pairs of TFs and normal fibroblasts from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Differentially expressed genes were identified, and a subset was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry.

Results: About 43% (126 of 292) of known deregulated genes in TFs were associated with cell proliferation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and immune response. Up-regulation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), which showed the most significant change, was detected in all six tested TFs compared with their paired normal fibroblasts. A further study found that FGFR2-positive fibroblasts were only observed inside the tumor tissues and not in tumor-surrounding stromal tissues, suggesting that FGFR2 could be used as a TF-specific marker in ESCC. Moreover, the conditioned medium from TFs was found to be able to promote ESCC tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion in vitro.

Conclusions: Our study provides new candidate genes for the esophageal cancer microenvironment. Based on our results, we hypothesize that FGFR2(+)-TFs might provide cancer cells with a suitable microenvironment via secretion of proteins that could promote cancer development and progression through stimulation of cancer cell proliferation, induction of angiogenesis, inhibition of cell adhesion, enhancement of cell mobility, and promotion of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  G Giannico , H Yang , E. G Neilson and A. B. Fogo
 

Background and objectives: - and β-dystroglycan (DG), which link the actin cytoskeleton of the podocyte to the glomerular basement membrane, are maintained in FSGS but decreased in minimal change disease (MCD). Fibrosis has been linked to increased fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP1) and epithelial–mesenchymal transition. We studied DG, FSP1, and podocyte differentiation in FSGS variants and cases of suspected FSGS.

Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We studied renal biopsies with FSGS, not otherwise specified (NOS), tip lesion, or collapsing variants (COLL), versus secondary FSGS or cases without segmental sclerotic lesions where a diagnosis of MCD versus FSGS could not be established (undefined [UNDEF]) and compared the expression of DG, FSP1, and podocyte Wilms' tumor antigen (WT1).

Results: WT1 is markedly decreased in NOS versus normal and correlates with the extent of sclerosis. - and β-DG are maintained in most primary and secondary FSGS cases. In contrast, -DG is significantly decreased in UNDEF, supporting a diagnosis of MCD. Furthermore, follow-up shows remission or decreased proteinuria in four of six of these UNDEF cases in response to therapy. Interstitial FSP1 is numerically highest in COLL but is only rarely found in tubules or podocytes in any other forms of FSGS.

Conclusions: We conclude that increased FSP1 may be a marker of the aggressive course of collapsing FSGS. Furthermore, DG staining is a useful adjunct to assist in distinction of FSGS versus MCD in biopsies without defining lesions.

  R Li , Y Li , X Fang , H Yang , J Wang , K Kristiansen and J. Wang
 

Next-generation massively parallel sequencing technologies provide ultrahigh throughput at two orders of magnitude lower unit cost than capillary Sanger sequencing technology. One of the key applications of next-generation sequencing is studying genetic variation between individuals using whole-genome or target region resequencing. Here, we have developed a consensus-calling and SNP-detection method for sequencing-by-synthesis Illumina Genome Analyzer technology. We designed this method by carefully considering the data quality, alignment, and experimental errors common to this technology. All of this information was integrated into a single quality score for each base under Bayesian theory to measure the accuracy of consensus calling. We tested this methodology using a large-scale human resequencing data set of 36x coverage and assembled a high-quality nonrepetitive consensus sequence for 92.25% of the diploid autosomes and 88.07% of the haploid X chromosome. Comparison of the consensus sequence with Illumina human 1M BeadChip genotyped alleles from the same DNA sample showed that 98.6% of the 37,933 genotyped alleles on the X chromosome and 98% of 999,981 genotyped alleles on autosomes were covered at 99.97% and 99.84% consistency, respectively. At a low sequencing depth, we used prior probability of dbSNP alleles and were able to improve coverage of the dbSNP sites significantly as compared to that obtained using a nonimputation model. Our analyses demonstrate that our method has a very low false call rate at any sequencing depth and excellent genome coverage at a high sequencing depth.

  G Zhang , G Guo , X Hu , Y Zhang , Q Li , R Li , R Zhuang , Z Lu , Z He , X Fang , L Chen , W Tian , Y Tao , K Kristiansen , X Zhang , S Li , H Yang , J Wang and J. Wang
 

Understanding the dynamics of eukaryotic transcriptome is essential for studying the complexity of transcriptional regulation and its impact on phenotype. However, comprehensive studies of transcriptomes at single base resolution are rare, even for modern organisms, and lacking for rice. Here, we present the first transcriptome atlas for eight organs of cultivated rice. Using high-throughput paired-end RNA-seq, we unambiguously detected transcripts expressing at an extremely low level, as well as a substantial number of novel transcripts, exons, and untranslated regions. An analysis of alternative splicing in the rice transcriptome revealed that alternative cis-splicing occurred in ~33% of all rice genes. This is far more than previously reported. In addition, we also identified 234 putative chimeric transcripts that seem to be produced by trans-splicing, indicating that transcript fusion events are more common than expected. In-depth analysis revealed a multitude of fusion transcripts that might be by-products of alternative splicing. Validation and chimeric transcript structural analysis provided evidence that some of these transcripts are likely to be functional in the cell. Taken together, our data provide extensive evidence that transcriptional regulation in rice is vastly more complex than previously believed.

  D Adhikari , G Flohr , N Gorre , Y Shen , H Yang , E Lundin , Z Lan , M. J Gambello and K. Liu
 

To maintain the length of reproductive life in a woman, it is essential that most of her ovarian primordial follicles are maintained in a quiescent state to provide a continuous supply of oocytes. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control the quiescence and activation of primordial follicles is still in its infancy. In this study, we provide some genetic evidence to show that the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (Tsc2), which negatively regulates mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), functions in oocytes to maintain the dormancy of primordial follicles. In mutant mice lacking the Tsc2 gene in oocytes, the pool of primordial follicles is activated prematurely due to elevated mTORC1 activity in oocytes. This results in depletion of follicles in early adulthood, causing premature ovarian failure (POF). Our results suggest that the Tsc1–Tsc2 complex mediated suppression of mTORC1 activity is indispensable for maintenance of the dormancy of primordial follicles, thus preserving the follicular pool, and that mTORC1 activity in oocytes promotes follicular activation. Our results also indicate that deregulation of Tsc/mTOR signaling in oocytes may cause pathological conditions of the ovary such as infertility and POF.

  H Yang , F Cabral and R. Bhattacharya
 

Tub 2.1, a monoclonal antibody commonly used to measure cellular tubulin content, is widely believed to recognize all β-tubulin isotypes. Though it has been used for more than two decades, the epitope for this antibody is not well established. We report for the first time that contrary to common belief, this antibody does not react with all isotypes of β-tubulin. Of the seven vertebrate β-tubulins, the more divergent class V and VI isotypes are not recognized by this antibody. Among the isotypes that do react, binding is similar for β2, β3, β4a and β4b but lower for β1, the most abundant isotype. Expression of chimeric tubulins verified that the epitope for Tub 2.1 is near the C-terminal end of β-tubulin. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region in nonreactive β5 to match the sequence of β4b resulted in strong reaction to Tub 2.1 and narrowed the epitope to amino acids 431–436.

  D Park , H Yang , J Jeong , K Ha , S Choi , C Kim , C Yoon and D. Paek
 

This paper presents a summary of arsenic level statistics from air and wipe samples taken from studies conducted in fabrication operations. The main objectives of this study were not only to describe arsenic measurement data but also, through a literature review, to categorize fabrication workers in accordance with observed arsenic levels. All airborne arsenic measurements reported were included in the summary statistics for analysis of the measurement data. The arithmetic mean was estimated assuming a lognormal distribution from the geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation or the range. In addition, weighted arithmetic means (WAMs) were calculated based on the number of measurements reported for each mean. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to compare arsenic levels classified according to several categories such as the year, sampling type, location sampled, operation type, and cleaning technique. Nine papers were found reporting airborne arsenic measurement data from maintenance workers or maintenance areas in semiconductor chip-making plants. A total of 40 statistical summaries from seven articles were identified that represented a total of 423 airborne arsenic measurements. Arsenic exposure levels taken during normal operating activities in implantation operations (WAM = 1.6 µg m–3, no. of samples = 77, no. of statistical summaries = 2) were found to be lower than exposure levels of engineers who were involved in maintenance works (7.7 µg m–3, no. of samples = 181, no. of statistical summaries = 19). The highest level (WAM = 218.6 µg m–3) was associated with various maintenance works performed inside an ion implantation chamber. ANOVA revealed no significant differences in the WAM arsenic levels among the categorizations based on operation and sampling characteristics. Arsenic levels (56.4 µg m–3) recorded during maintenance works performed in dry conditions were found to be much higher than those from maintenance works in wet conditions (0.6 µg m–3). Arsenic levels from wipe samples in process areas after maintenance activities ranged from non-detectable to 146 µg cm–2, indicating the potential for dispersion into the air and hence inhalation. We conclude that workers who are regularly or occasionally involved in maintenance work have higher potential for occupational exposure than other employees who are in charge of routine production work. In addition, fabrication workers can be classified into two groups based on the reviewed arsenic exposure levels: operators with potential for low levels of exposure and maintenance engineers with high levels of exposure. These classifications could be used as a basis for a qualitative ordinal ranking of exposure in an epidemiological study.

 
 
 
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