Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by H Taniguchi
Total Records ( 4 ) for H Taniguchi
  T Kubo , Y Kuroda , H Shimizu , A Kokubu , N Okada , F Hosoda , Y Arai , Y Nakamura , H Taniguchi , K Yanagihara , I Imoto , J Inazawa , S Hirohashi and T. Shibata
 

The tyrosine kinase (TK) family is an important regulator of signaling pathways that control a variety of physiological and pathological conditions, and a substantial proportion of TK genes are genetically altered in cancer. To clarify the somatic mutation profile of TK genes and discover potential targets for gastric cancer (GC) therapy, we undertook a systematic screening of mutations in the kinase domains of all human TK genes (636 exons of 90 genes) in 17 GC cell lines and 52 microdissected primary GCs with poorly differentiated histology. We identified 26 non-synonymous alterations (22 genes in total) that included 11 sequence alterations in cell lines and 15 somatic mutations in primary tumors. Recurrent mutations were found in four genes including a known oncogene (NTRK3), the Src kinase family (LTK and CSK) and a potential Wnt signal activator (ROR2). In addition, we analyzed copy number alterations of all the TK gene loci in the same cohort samples by array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis and identified 24 high-level amplifications and two homozygous deletions. Both sequence alteration and frequent copy number aberration were detected in two TK genes (HCK and ERBB2), strongly suggesting that they encode potential oncogenes in GC. Our focused and integrated analyses of systemic resequencing and gene copy number have revealed the novel onco-kinome profile of GC and pave the way to a comprehensive understanding of the GC genome.

  N. T Okita , Y Yamada , D Takahari , Y Hirashima , J Matsubara , K Kato , T Hamaguchi , K Shirao , Y Shimada , H Taniguchi and T. Shimoda
  Objective

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors VEGF-R1, -R2 and -R3 play important roles in tumor angiogenesis and are associated with poor prognosis in several solid tumors. However, their functional significance remains unclarified. Here, we investigated the associations between the expression of these receptors and the clinical outcomes of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients.

Methods

An immunohistochemical approach was used to detect VEGF-R1, -R2 and -R3 expression in 91 CRC patients who underwent surgery and received chemotherapy at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the prognostic significance of these biomarkers.

Results

Immunoreactivity for VEGF-R2 and -R3 was localized in microvessels and that for VEGF-R1 in cancer cells and stromal microvessels. VEGF-R1 staining in cancer cells (>10% staining) was found in 84 patients (92%) and in stromal vessels in 75 patients (82%). VEGF-R2 staining in tumor vessels (>10% staining) was found in 84 patients (92%), whereas VEGF-R3 staining was found in 85 patients (93%). Strong positive staining (>60% staining) of VEGF-R1 in tumor cells, and VEGF-R1, -R2 and -R3 in vessels was identified in 58 (64%), 33 (36%), 52 (57%) and 60 (66%) patients, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that VEGF-R1 strong positive staining correlated with shorter post-operative survival in patients with Stage II/III disease (P = 0.01), but neither VEGF-R2 nor R3 expression correlated with survival.

Conclusions

VEGF-R1, -R2 and -R3 were highly expressed in CRC cells and stromal vessels. VEGF-R1 strong positive staining correlated with shorter survival after CRC surgery.

  T Tsukada , H Taniguchi , S Ootaki , Y Yamada and M. Inoue
 

This study aimed to describe the electromyographic (EMG) activity patterns of the genioglossus (GG) and suprahyoid (SHy) muscles during swallowing. The effects of changes in food texture/consistency and head posture on transport of the swallowed bolus were also investigated. Participants were 10 normal adults. Test foods consisted of a liquid, a syrup, or 4 ml of paste made from 0.5% or 1.0% agar. Each food was swallowed with the head in one of three positions, and EMGs and videofluorographic (VF) images were recorded. Mean values of onset, peak, and offset times, peak amplitude, area, and duration of the EMG burst were measured. The total swallowing time, oral ejection time, pharyngeal transit time, clearance time, fauces transit time, and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) transit time were measured. The GG muscle burst patterns showed two peaks (GG1 and GG2) during each swallowing. The offset time and duration of the GG1 burst and the onset, peak, and offset times and duration of both the GG2 and SHy bursts were significantly affected by food texture. There were no significant differences in bolus transit time among the different experimental conditions. Regression analyses demonstrated significant linear relationships between the tongue tip touching the palate and the peak of the GG1 burst, between passage of the bolus tail at the fauces and offset of the GG1 burst, between passage of the bolus tail at the UES and peak of the GG2 burst, and between passage of the bolus tail at the UES and offset of the SHy burst. These results demonstrate that the duration, but not the amplitude, of tongue and suprahyoid muscle activity were increased with increasing hardness of food during swallowing and that the bolus transit time can be fixed within a certain range of physical food properties.

  H Morii , M Ogawa , K Fukuda , H Taniguchi and Y. Koga
 

For the last decade, it has been believed that phosphatidylinositol (PI) in mycobacteria is synthesized from free inositol and CDP-diacylglycerol by PI synthase in the presence of ATP. The role of ATP in this process, however, is not understood. Additionally, the PI synthase activity is extremely low compared with the PI synthase activity of yeast. When CDP-diacylglycerol and [14C]1L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate were incubated with the cell wall components of Mycobacterium smegmatis, both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and PI were formed, as identified by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography. PI was formed from PIP by incubation with the cell wall components. Thus, mycobacterial PI was synthesized from CDP-diacylglycerol and myo-inositol 1-phosphate via PIP, which was dephosphorylated to PI. The gene-encoding PIP synthase from four species of mycobacteria was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and PIP synthase activity was confirmed. A very low, but significant level of free [3H]inositol was incorporated into PI in mycobacterial cell wall preparations, but not in recombinant E. coli cell homogenates. This activity could be explained by the presence of two minor PI metabolic pathways: PI/inositol exchange reaction and phosphorylation of inositol by ATP prior to entering the PIP synthase pathway.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility