Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by H Matschinger
Total Records ( 2 ) for H Matschinger
  Y Huang , R Kotov , G de Girolamo , A Preti , M Angermeyer , C Benjet , K Demyttenaere , R de Graaf , O Gureje , A. N Karam , S Lee , J. P Lepine , H Matschinger , J Posada Villa , S Suliman , G Vilagut and R. C. Kessler
 

Background

Little is known about the cross-national population prevalence or correlates of personality disorders.

Aims

To estimate prevalence and correlates of DSM–IV personality disorder clusters in the World Health Organization World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys.

Method

International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE) screening questions in 13 countries (n = 21 162) were calibrated to masked IPDE clinical diagnoses. Prevalence and correlates were estimated using multiple imputation.

Results

Prevalence estimates are 6.1% (s.e. = 0.3) for any personality disorder and 3.6% (s.e. = 0.3), 1.5% (s.e. = 0.1) and 2.7% (s.e. = 0.2) for Clusters A, B and C respectively. Personality disorders are significantly elevated among males, the previously married (Cluster C), unemployed (Cluster C), the young (Clusters A and B) and the poorly educated. Personality disorders are highly comorbid with Axis I disorders. Impairments associated with personality disorders are only partially explained by comorbidity.

Conclusions

Personality disorders are relatively common disorders that often co-occur with Axis I disorders and are associated with significant role impairments beyond those due to comorbidity.

  H. H Konig , A Born , D Heider , H Matschinger , S Heinrich , S. G Riedel Heller , D Surall , M. C Angermeyer and C. Roick
 

Background

Individuals with anxiety disorders often do not receive an accurate diagnosis or adequate treatment in primary care.

Aims

To analyse the cost-effectiveness of an optimised care model for people with anxiety disorders in primary care.

Method

In a cluster randomised controlled trial, 46 primary care practices with 389 individuals positively screened with anxiety were randomised to intervention (23 practices, 201 participants) or usual care (23 practices, 188 participants). Physicians in the intervention group received training on diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders combined with the offer of a psychiatric consultation–liaison service for 6 months. Anxiety, depression, quality of life, service utilisation and costs were assessed at baseline, 6-month and 9-month follow-up.

Results

No significant differences were observed between intervention and control group on the Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory and EQ–5D during follow-up. Total costs were higher in the intervention group (4911 v. 3453, P = 0.09). The probability of an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio <50 000 per quality-adjusted life year was below 10%.

Conclusions

The optimised care model did not prove to be cost-effective.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility