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Articles by H Kantarjian
Total Records ( 3 ) for H Kantarjian
  A Quintas Cardama , H Kantarjian , D Jones , J Shan , G Borthakur , D Thomas , S Kornblau , S O'Brien and J. Cortes
 

Patients not in complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) continuously face the competing possibilities of eventually achieving a cytogenetic response versus progressing. We analyzed the probability of achieving a CCyR, major molecular response, and progression in 258 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in early chronic phase at 3, 6, and 12 months from imatinib start. The initial imatinib dose was 800 mg/day in 208 (81%) and 400 mg/day in 50 (19%) patients. For patients not in CCyR, the probability of achieving CCyR (P = .002) or major molecular response (P = .004) significantly decreased, whereas the risk of progression increased (P = .16) at each time point. Patients with a BCR-ABL1/ABL1 ratio greater than 1% to 10% after 3 months of imatinib had a 92% probability of achieving CCyR with continued therapy, similar to the 98% for those with 1% or less, but their risk of progression (11%) was almost 3-fold that of patients with a BCR-ABL1/ABL1 transcript ratio of 1% or less (4%) and similar to that of patients with transcript levels more than 10% (13%). These results suggest that patients not in CCyR after 12 months on imatinib have a higher risk of progression. This risk is discernible as early as 3 months into imatinib therapy by molecular analysis and may provide the rationale to institute therapies that render higher rates of early response.

  H Kantarjian , J Cortes , D. W Kim , P Dorlhiac Llacer , R Pasquini , J DiPersio , M. C Muller , J. P Radich , H. J Khoury , N Khoroshko , M. B Bradley Garelik , C Zhu and M. S. Tallman
 

Dasatinib is the most potent BCR-ABL inhibitor, with 325-fold higher potency than imatinib against unmutated BCR-ABL in vitro. Studies have demonstrated the benefits of dasatinib 70 mg twice daily in patients with accelerated-phase chronic myeloid leukemia intolerant or resistant to imatinib. A phase 3 study compared the efficacy and safety of dasatinib 140 mg once daily with the current twice-daily regimen. Here, results from the subgroup with accelerated-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 317) with a median follow-up of 15 months (treatment duration, 0.03-31.15 months) are reported. Among patients randomized to once-daily (n = 158) or twice-daily (n = 159) treatment, rates of major hematologic and cytogenetic responses were comparable (major hematologic response, 66% vs 68%; major cytogenetic response, 39% vs 43%, respectively). Estimated progression-free survival rates at 24 months were 51% and 55%, whereas overall survival rates were 63% versus 72%. Once-daily treatment was associated with an improved safety profile. In particular, significantly fewer patients in the once-daily group experienced a pleural effusion (all grades, 20% vs 39% P < .001). These results demonstrate that dasatinib 140 mg once daily has similar efficacy to dasatinib 70 mg twice daily but with an improved safety profile. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #CA180-035.

  W Ma , H Kantarjian , B Bekele , A. C Donahue , X Zhang , Z. J Zhang , S O`Brien , E Estey , Z Estrov , J Cortes , M Keating , F Giles and M. Albitar
 

Purpose: Cytogenetic abnormalities are currently the most important predictors of response and clinical outcome for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or advanced-stage myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Because clinical outcomes vary markedly within cytogenetic subgroups, additional biological markers are needed for risk stratification.

Experimental Design: We assessed the utility of measuring pretreatment proteasome chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like activities in plasma to predict response and survival of patients with AML (n = 174) or advanced-stage MDS (n = 52).

Results: All three enzymatic activities were significantly (P < 0.001) increased in the plasma of patients with AML and MDS compared with normal controls. Both chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities, but not trypsin-like activity, correlated with outcome. Chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities, but not trypsin-like activity, predicted response in univariate analysis (P = 0.002). However, only chymotrypsin-like activity was independent predictor of response from age grouping (<70 versus ≥70 years), cytogenetics, and blood urea nitrogen in multivariate analysis. Similarly, both chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities, but not trypsin-like activity, were predictors of overall survival in univariate analysis (P < 0.0001), but only chymotrypsin-like activity was independent of cytogenetics, age, performance status, blood urea nitrogen, and β2-microglobulin in multivariate Cox regression models. Chymotrypsin-like activity was also a strong independent predictor of survival in patients with intermediate karyotype (n = 124).

Conclusions: Measuring plasma chymotrypsin-like activity may provide a powerful biomarker for risk stratification in patients with AML and advanced-stage MDS, including those with normal karyotype.

 
 
 
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