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Articles by H Gronberg
Total Records ( 3 ) for H Gronberg
  S. L Zheng , V. L Stevens , F Wiklund , S. D Isaacs , J Sun , S Smith , K Pruett , K. E Wiley , S. T Kim , Y Zhu , Z Zhang , F. C Hsu , A. R Turner , J. E Johansson , W Liu , J. W Kim , B. L Chang , D Duggan , J Carpten , C Rodriguez , W Isaacs , H Gronberg and J. Xu
 

Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at 11q13 were recently implicated in prostate cancer risk by two genome-wide association studies and were consistently replicated in multiple study populations. To explore prostate cancer association in the regions flanking these SNPs, we genotyped 31 tagging SNPs in a ~110 kb region at 11q13 in a Swedish case-control study (Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden), including 2,899 cases and 1,722 controls. We found evidence of prostate cancer association for the previously implicated SNPs including rs10896449, which we termed locus 1. In addition, multiple SNPs on the centromeric side of the region, including rs12418451, were also significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (termed locus 2). The two groups of SNPs were separated by a recombination hotspot. We then evaluated these two representative SNPs in an additional ~4,000 cases and ~3,000 controls from three study populations and confirmed both loci at 11q13. In the combined allelic test of all four populations, P = 4.0 x 10–11 for rs10896449 at locus 1 and P = 1.2 x 10–6 for rs12418451 at locus 2, and both remained significant after adjusting for the other locus and study population. The prostate cancer association at these two 11q13 loci was unlikely confounded by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) detection bias because neither SNP was associated with PSA levels in controls. Unlike locus 1, in which no known gene is located, several putative mRNAs are in close proximity to locus 2. Additional confirmation studies at locus 2 and functional studies for both loci are needed to advance our knowledge on the etiology of prostate cancer. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(6):1815–20)

  J. R Stark , F Wiklund , H Gronberg , F Schumacher , J. A Sinnott , M. J Stampfer , L. A Mucci and P. Kraft
 

An understanding of factors associated with prostate cancer (PCa) mortality is increasingly important given the biological heterogeneity of disease. Previous studies have shown that genetic variation in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is associated with PCa incidence, but any role in progression and mortality is unclear. Among 1,252 PCa cases from the Cancer Prostate in Sweden study, we conducted time-to-event analyses of PCa mortality for 99 individual tagging SNPs and haploytpes from 20 genes in the TLR pathway. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 99% confidence intervals (99% CI). Global P values were estimated from a likelihood ratio test. During a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 191 PCa deaths occurred. Controlling for age and geographic location, two polymorphisms were statistically significantly associated with PCa mortality (P < 0.01). Compared with homozygous wild-type carriers of the TLR-9 polymorphism (rs187084), the HR (99% CI) was 1.57 (1.02, 2.41) for heterozygotes and 1.02 (0.57, 1.84) for rare homozygotes (P = 0.009). For a MIC-1 SNP (rs1227732), the HR comparing carriers of at least one copy of the minor allele to wild-type homozygotes was 0.54 (99% CI: 0.34, 0.87). Only the MIC-1 SNP remained significant after additional adjustment for treatment. No significant associations were observed for common haplotypes and PCa mortality. This study highlights the importance of studies of PCa mortality because risk factors for incidence and mortality may differ. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(6):1859–63)

  R. J Klein , C Hallden , A. M Cronin , A Ploner , F Wiklund , A. S Bjartell , P Stattin , J Xu , P. T Scardino , K Offit , A. J Vickers , H Gronberg and H. Lilja
 

Polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer include those in three genes encoding major secretory products of the prostate: KLK2 (encoding kallikrein-related peptidase 2; hK2), KLK3 (encoding prostate-specific antigen; PSA), and MSMB (encoding β-microseminoprotein). PSA and hK2, members of the kallikrein family, are elevated in sera of men with prostate cancer. In a comprehensive analysis that included sequencing of all coding, flanking, and 2 kb of putative promoter regions of all 15 kallikrein (KLK) genes spanning 280 kb on chromosome 19q, we identified novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and genotyped 104 SNPs in 1,419 cancer cases and 736 controls in Cancer Prostate in Sweden 1, with independent replication in 1,267 cases and 901 controls in Cancer Prostate in Sweden 2. This verified prior associations of SNPs in KLK2 and in MSMB (but not in KLK3) with prostate cancer. Twelve SNPs in KLK2 and KLK3 were associated with levels of PSA forms or hK2 in plasma of control subjects. Based on our comprehensive approach, this is likely to represent all common KLK variants associated with these phenotypes. A T allele at rs198977 in KLK2 was associated with increased cancer risk and a striking decrease of hK2 levels in blood. We also found a strong interaction between rs198977 genotype and hK2 levels in blood in predicting cancer risk. Based on this strong association, we developed a model for predicting prostate cancer risk from standard biomarkers, rs198977 genotype, and rs198977 x hK2 interaction; this model had greater accuracy than did biomarkers alone (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.874 versus 0.866), providing proof in principle to clinical application for our findings. Cancer Prev Res; 3(5); 611–9. ©2010 AACR.

 
 
 
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