Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by H Cheng
Total Records ( 17 ) for H Cheng
  H Cheng , N Sun , X Sun , B Chen , F Li , J Feng , L Cheng and Y. Cao
 

Platinum-based chemotherapeutics are the most common regimens for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. However, it is difficult to identify platinum resistance in clinical treatment. Genetic factors are thought to represent important determinants of drug efficacy. In this study, we investigated whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human mutS homolog 2 (hMSH2) and the human mutL homolog 1 (hMLH1) were associated with the tumor response in advanced NSCLC patients received platinum-based chemotherapy in Chinese population. Totally, 96 patients with advanced NSCLC were routinely treated with cisplatin- or carboplatin-based chemotherapy. The three-dimensional (3D), polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray method was used to evaluate the genotypes of hMSH2 gIVS12-6T/C and hMLH1-1151T/A with peripheral lymphocytes. We found that there was a significantly increased chance of treatment response to platinum-based chemotherapy with the hMSH2 gIVS12-6T/C polymorphism. The 3D polyacrylamide gel-based DNA microarray method is accurate, high-throughput, and inexpensive, especially suitable for a large scale of SNP genotyping in population.

  F Yang , J Wang , Y Ji , H Cheng , J Wan , Z Xiao and G. Zhou
 

Small RNAs, generally expressed at low levels, are difficult to reach usable levels from limited material. In this study, we have developed a novel method to amplify target RNA. The amplification procedure was carried out by sequential RT-PCR, effective separation, restriction enzymatic cleavage of cDNA strand, and run-off transcription in vitro of target RNA from its cDNA. Introduction of a unique stem-loop linker into cDNA strand is the key step to form a unique restriction enzyme recognition sequence that is not in cDNA sequence of target RNA. This method can be used to amplify RNA samples from various origins and has many advantages in amplifying unknown small RNAs and small RNA mixtures. The amplified RNA has the full sequence of original RNA except for an extra 5' G and an additional 3' A or C. The method worked well for amplifications of a microRNA, a piwi interacting RNA and two small RNA mixtures.

  X Fan , Y Ding , S Brown , L Zhou , M Shaw , M. C Vella , H Cheng , E. C McNay , R. S Sherwin and R. J. McCrimmon
  In nondiabetic rodents, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a role in the glucose-sensing mechanism used by the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), a key brain region involved in the detection of hypoglycemia. However, AMPK is regulated by both hyper- and hypoglycemia, so whether AMPK plays a similar role in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is unknown. To address this issue, we used four groups of chronically catheterized male diabetic BB rats, a rodent model of autoimmune T1DM with established insulin—requiring diabetes (40 ± 4 pmol/l basal c-peptide). Two groups were subjected to 3 days of recurrent hypoglycemia (RH), while the other two groups were kept hyperglycemic [chronic hyperglycemia (CH)]. All groups subsequently underwent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp studies on day 4 in conjunction with VMH microinjection with either saline (control) or AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide) to activate AMPK. Compared with controls, local VMH application of AICAR during hypoglycemia amplified both glucagon [means ± SE, area under the curve over time (AUC/t) 144 ± 43 vs. 50 ± 11 ng·l–1·min–1; P < 0.05] and epinephrine [4.27 ± 0.96 vs. 1.06 ± 0.26 nmol·l–1·min–1; P < 0.05] responses in RH-BB rats, and amplified the glucagon [151 ± 22 vs. 85 ± 22 ng·l–1·min–1; P < 0.05] response in CH-BB rats. We conclude that VMH AMPK also plays a role in glucose-sensing during hypoglycemia in a rodent model of T1DM. Moreover, our data suggest that it may be possible to partially restore the hypoglycemia-specific glucagon secretory defect characteristic of T1DM through manipulation of VMH AMPK.
  H Cheng and T. Force
 

Abstract: In 2002, Hoshijima and Chien drew largely theoretical parallels between the dysregulation of the signaling pathways driving cancer and those driving cardiac hypertrophy (Hoshijima M, Chien KR. J Clin Invest. 2002;109:849–855). On the surface, this statement appeared to stretch the limits of reason, given the fact that cancer cells are known for their proliferative capacity, and adult cardiomyocytes are, except under unusual circumstances, terminally differentiated and incapable of re-entering the cell cycle. However, on closer examination, there are numerous parallels between signaling pathways that drive tumorigenesis and signaling pathways that regulate hypertrophic responses and survival in cardiomyocytes. Indeed, this issue appears to be at the core of the cardiotoxicity (often manifest as a dilated cardiomyopathy) that can result from treatment with agents typically referred to as "targeted therapeutics," which target specific protein kinases that are dysregulated in cancer. Herein, we examine the cardiotoxicity of targeted therapeutics, focusing on the underlying molecular mechanisms, thereby allowing an understanding of the problem but also allowing the identification of novel, and sometimes surprising, roles played by protein kinases in the heart.

  W Peng , Y Zhang , M Zheng , H Cheng , W Zhu , C. M Cao and R. P. Xiao
 

Rationale: Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK)II is a multifunctional kinase involved in vital cellular processes such as Ca2+ handling and cell fate regulation. In mammalian heart, 2 primary CaMKII isoforms, B and C, localize in nuclear and cytosolic compartments, respectively. Although previous studies have established an essential role of CaMKII-C in cardiomyocyte apoptosis, the functional role of the more abundant isoform, CaMKII-B, remains elusive.

Objective: Here, we determined the potential role of CaMKII-B in regulating cardiomyocyte viability and explored the underlying mechanism.

Methods and Results: In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, the expression of CaMKII-B and CaMKII-C was inversely regulated in response to H2O2-induced oxidative stress with a profound reduction of the former and an increase of the later. Similarly, in vivo ischemia/reperfusion (IR) led to an opposite regulation of these CaMKII isoforms in a rat myocardial IR model. Notably, overexpression of CaMKII-B protected cardiomyocytes against oxidative stress-, hypoxia-, and angiotensin II-induced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of its cytosolic counterpart promoted apoptosis. Using cDNA microarray, real-time PCR and Western blotting, we demonstrated that overexpression of CaMKII-B but not CaMKII-C elevated expression of heat shock protein (HSP)70 family members, including inducible (i)HSP70 and its homolog (Hst70). Moreover, overexpression of CaMKII-B led to phosphorylation and activation of heat shock factor (HSF)1, the primary transcription factor responsible for HSP70 gene regulation. Importantly, gene silencing of iHSP70, but not Hst70, abolished CaMKII-B-mediated protective effect, indicating that only iHSP70 was required for CaMKII-B elicited antiapoptotic signaling.

Conclusions: We conclude that cardiac CaMKII-B and CaMKII-C were inversely regulated in response to oxidative stress and IR injury, and that in contrast to CaMKII-C, CaMKII-B serves as a potent suppressor of cardiomyocyte apoptosis triggered by multiple death-inducing stimuli via phosphorylation of HSF1 and subsequent induction of iHSP70, marking both CaMKII- isoforms as promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of ischemic heart disease.

  S Wei , A Guo , B Chen , W Kutschke , Y. P Xie , K Zimmerman , R. M Weiss , M. E Anderson , H Cheng and L. S. Song
  Rationale:

The transverse tubule (T-tubule) system is the ultrastructural substrate for excitation–contraction coupling in ventricular myocytes; T-tubule disorganization and loss are linked to decreased contractility in end stage heart failure (HF).

Objective:

We sought to examine (1) whether pathological T-tubule remodeling occurs early in compensated hypertrophy and, if so, how it evolves during the transition from hypertrophy to HF; and (2) the role of junctophilin-2 in T-tubule remodeling.

Methods and Results:

We investigated T-tubule remodeling in relation to ventricular function during HF progression using state-of-the-art confocal imaging of T-tubules in intact hearts, using a thoracic aortic banding rat HF model. We developed a quantitative T-tubule power (TTpower) index to represent the integrity of T-tubule structure. We found that discrete local loss and global reorganization of the T-tubule system (leftward shift of TTpower histogram) started early in compensated hypertrophy in left ventricular (LV) myocytes, before LV dysfunction, as detected by echocardiography. With progression from compensated hypertrophy to early and late HF, T-tubule remodeling spread from the LV to the right ventricle, and TTpower histograms of both ventricles gradually shifted leftward. The mean LV TTpower showed a strong correlation with ejection fraction and heart weight to body weight ratio. Over the progression to HF, we observed a gradual reduction in the expression of a junctophilin protein (JP-2) implicated in the formation of T-tubule/sarcoplasmic reticulum junctions. Furthermore, we found that JP-2 knockdown by gene silencing reduced T-tubule structure integrity in cultured adult ventricular myocytes.

Conclusions:

T-tubule remodeling in response to thoracic aortic banding stress begins before echocardiographically detectable LV dysfunction and progresses over the development of overt structural heart disease. LV T-tubule remodeling is closely associated with the severity of cardiac hypertrophy and predicts LV function. Thus, T-tubule remodeling may constitute a key mechanism underlying the transition from compensated hypertrophy to HF.

  P Tavassoli , L. A Wafa , H Cheng , A Zoubeidi , L Fazli , M Gleave , R Snoek and P. S. Rennie
 

Aberrant expression of androgen receptor (AR) coregulators has been linked to progression of prostate cancers to castration resistance. Using the repressed transactivator yeast two-hybrid system, we found that TATA binding protein-associated factor 1 (TAF1) interacted with the AR. In tissue microarrays, TAF1 was shown to steadily increase with duration of neoadjuvant androgen withdrawal and with progression to castration resistance. Glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays established that TAF1 bound through its acetylation and ubiquitin-activating/conjugating domains (E1/E2) directly to the AR N terminus. Coimmunoprecipitation and ChIP assays revealed colocalization of TAF1 and AR on the prostate-specific antigen promoter/enhancer in prostate cancer cells. With respect to modulation of AR activity, overexpression of TAF1 enhanced AR activity severalfold, whereas small interfering RNA knockdown of TAF1 significantly decreased AR transactivation. Although full-length TAF1 showed enhancement of both AR and some generic gene transcriptional activity, selective AR coactivator activity by TAF1 was demonstrated in transactivation experiments using cloned N-terminal kinase and E1/E2 functional domains. In keeping with AR coactivation by the ubiquitin-activating and -conjugating domain, TAF1 was found to greatly increase the cellular amount of polyubiquitinated AR. In conclusion, our results indicate that increased TAF1 expression is associated with progression of human prostate cancers to the lethal castration-resistant state. Because TAF1 is a coactivator of AR that binds and enhances AR transcriptional activity, its overexpression could be part of a compensatory mechanism adapted by cancer cells to overcome reduced levels of circulating androgens.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility