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Articles by H Bueno
Total Records ( 3 ) for H Bueno
  I Ferreira Gonzalez , J. R Marsal , F Mitjavila , A Parada , A Ribera , P Cascant , N Soriano , P. L Sanchez , F Aros , M Heras , H Bueno , J Marrugat , J Cunat , E Civeira and G. Permanyer Miralda
 

Background— The risk of selection bias in registries and its consequences are relatively unexplored. We sought to assess selection bias in a recent registry about acute coronary syndrome and to explore the way of conducting and reporting patient registries of acute coronary syndrome.

Methods and Results— We analyzed data from patients of a national acute coronary syndrome registry undergoing an audit about the comprehensiveness of the recruitment/inclusion. Patients initially included by hospital investigators (n=3265) were compared to eligible nonincluded (missed) patients (n=1439). We assessed, for 25 exposure variables, the deviation of the in-hospital mortality relative risks calculated in the initial sample from the actual relative risks. Missed patients were of higher risk and received less recommended therapies than the included patients. In-hospital mortality was almost 3 times higher in the missed population (9.34% [95% CI, 7.84 to 10.85] versus 3.9% [95% CI, 2.89 to 4.92]). Initial relative risks diverged from the actual relative risks more than expected by chance (P<0.05) in 21 variables, being higher than 10% in 17 variables. This deviation persisted on a smaller degree on multivariable analysis. Additionally, we reviewed a sample of 129 patient registries focused on acute coronary syndrome published in thirteen journals, collecting information on good registry performance items. Only in 38 (29.4%) and 48 (37.2%) registries was any audit of recruitment/inclusion and data abstraction, respectively, mentioned. Only 4 (3.1%) authors acknowledged potential selection bias because of incomplete recruitment.

Conclusions— Irregular inclusion can introduce substantial systematic bias in registries. This problem has not been explicitly addressed in a substantial number of them.

  J. H Lichtman , N. P Lorenze , G D'Onofrio , J. A Spertus , S. T Lindau , T. M Morgan , J Herrin , H Bueno , J. A Mattera , P. M Ridker and H. M. Krumholz
  Background—

Among individuals with ischemic heart disease, young women with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) represent an extreme phenotype associated with an excess mortality risk. Although women younger than 55 years of age account for less than 5% of hospitalized AMI events, almost 16 000 deaths are reported annually in this group, making heart disease a leading killer of young women. Despite a higher risk of mortality compared with similarly aged men, young women have been the subject of few studies.

Methods and Results—

Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients (VIRGO) is a large, observational study of the presentation, treatment, and outcomes of young women and men with AMI. VIRGO will enroll 2000 women, 18 to 55 years of age, with AMI and a comparison cohort of 1000 men with AMI from more than 100 participating hospitals. The aims of the study are to determine sex differences in the distribution and prognostic importance of biological, demographic, clinical, and psychosocial risk factors; to determine whether there are sex differences in the quality of care received by young AMI patients; and to determine how these factors contribute to sex differences in outcomes (including mortality, hospitalization, and health status). Blood serum and DNA for consenting participants will be stored for future studies.

Conclusions—

VIRGO will seek to identify novel and prognostic factors that contribute to outcomes in this young AMI population. Results from the study will be used to develop clinically useful risk-stratification models for young AMI patients, explain sex differences in outcomes, and identify targets for intervention.

  J. S Ross , J Chen , Z Lin , H Bueno , J. P Curtis , P. S Keenan , S. L. T Normand , G Schreiner , J. A Spertus , M. T Vidan , Y Wang and H. M. Krumholz
 

Background— In July 2009, Medicare began publicly reporting hospitals’ risk-standardized 30-day all-cause readmission rates (RSRRs) among fee-for-service beneficiaries discharged after hospitalization for heart failure from all the US acute care nonfederal hospitals. No recent national trends in RSRRs have been reported, and it is not known whether hospital-specific performance is improving or variation in performance is decreasing.

Methods and Results— We used 2004–2006 Medicare administrative data to identify all fee-for-service beneficiaries admitted to a US acute care hospital for heart failure and discharged alive. We estimated mean annual RSRRs, a National Quality Forum-endorsed metric for quality, using 2-level hierarchical models that accounted for age, sex, and multiple comorbidities; variation in quality was estimated by the SD of the RSRRs. There were 570 996 distinct hospitalizations for heart failure in which the patient was discharged alive in 4728 hospitals in 2004, 544 550 in 4694 hospitals in 2005, and 501 234 in 4674 hospitals in 2006. Unadjusted 30-day all-cause readmission rates were virtually identical over this period: 23.0% in 2004, 23.3% in 2005, and 22.9% in 2006. The mean and SD of RSRRs were also similar: mean (SD) of 23.7% (1.3) in 2004, 23.9% (1.4) in 2005, and 23.8% (1.4) in 2006, suggesting similar hospital variation throughout the study period.

Conclusions— National mean and RSRR distributions among Medicare beneficiaries discharged after hospitalization for heart failure have not changed in recent years, indicating that there was neither improvement in hospital readmission rates nor in hospital variations in rates over this time period.

 
 
 
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