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Articles by G.K. Aseri
Total Records ( 3 ) for G.K. Aseri
  Brajesh Singh , Mukta Jain , S.V. Singh , Kuldeep Dhama , G.K. Aseri , Neelam Jain , Manali Datta , Neeraj Kumar , Parul Yadav , Sujata Jayaraman , Saurabh Gupta , Kundan Kumar Chaubey and Jagdip Singh Sohal
  Mycobacteria are dreadful human and animal pathogens causing range of mycobacterioses in different tissues. Due to their cell wall composition and their adaptability mycobacteria can survive in different habitats for years. Emergence of Multi-drug Resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) strains has complicated the problem of mycobacterial disease control. Therefore new drugs should evolve to fight drug resistance. Medicinal plants may offer a new hope as source of bioactive molecules for developing alternative medicines for the mycobacterial diseases. Presently used anti-mycobacterial medicines produce serious side-effects and cannot be used in animals because of risk of entry into food chain. Plant derived medicines may help solving this problem and fighting the drug resistance. The present study reviews the literature available on anti- mycobacterial plants and their bioactive molecules with hope that this effort will expedite the research on development of a novel plant derived drugs against mycobacterial diseases.
  B.J. Stephen , S.V. Singh , Manali Datta , Neelam Jain , Sujata Jayaraman , K.K. Chaubey , S. Gupta , Manju Singh , G.K. Aseri , Neeraj Khare , Parul Yadav , Kuldeep Dhama and J.S. Sohal
  Tuberculosis, an infectious bacterial disease that affects the lungs is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). It is the second most infectious disease after AIDS, which can affect both animals and humans. Johne’s Disease (JD) or paratuberculosis caused by in intracellular bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is an incurable wasting disease known to affect a large number of domestic animals and poses serious threat to livestock industries through huge economic losses. Conventional diagnostic methods like enzyme linked immunosorbat assay (ELISA), Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), cultural isolation are identification for use in MAP detection while sputum smear microscopy and PCR techniques remain the gold standards for TB detection despite advancement in pathogen detection most of these diagnostic methods are time consuming and have low efficacy and this become a heavy burden to developing and underdeveloped countries. When nanoscale particles are used as tags or labels, measuring the activity or presence of an analyte becomes faster, flexible and highly sensitive. These advantages nanomaterials possess, research have now focused their attention to nanotechnology based detection. Though research have shown these test to be more sensitive, less laboratorious and less time consuming, more needs to be done to introduce point of care diagnostics into the global market. This review highlights the prospects of nanotechnology based diagnostic tests as valuable alternative for rapid detection of this economically important pathogen with high accuracy and precision.
  B.J. Stephen , Mukta Jain , Kuldeep Dhama , S.V. Singh , Manali Datta , Neelam Jain , Sujata Jayaraman , Manju Singh , K.K. Chaubey , S. Gupta , G.K. Aseri , Neeraj Khare , Parul Yadav and J.S. Sohal
  Johne’s Disease (JD) is a contagious fatal granulomatous enteritis, known to affect ruminants and is caused by the acid-fast Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). The bacterium has also been linked to Crohn’s Disease (CD) in humans. Treatment options are scarce with culling practiced in the case of Johne’s Disease (JD) and administration of anti-inflammatory drugs for pain and inflammation in case of CD. In both cases antimicrobial therapy against MAP does not have the ultimate potential. The very promising, yet untapped potential of nanotechnology offers a suitable platform for developing new therapeutic strategies for diseases caused by the bacteria. Uniformity, specificity and reproducibility are some of the characteristics of nanotechnology that can be exploited for the treatment of infectious diseases. Factors like cost, efficacy, safety and bioavailability of drugs can be greatly improved when the drugs are delivered with precision and at a controlled delivery rate to the target location. Nanotechnology can help in achieving these targets. This review discusses the current scenario of available therapeutic approaches and proposes drugs targeting strategies and vaccine development methods for the treatment and prevention of MAP related diseases.
 
 
 
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