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Articles by G.J. Amabeoku
Total Records ( 3 ) for G.J. Amabeoku
  G.J. Amabeoku and C.G. Kinyua
  The anticonvulsant activity of Zanthoxylum capense (Thunb.) Harv. (Rutaceae) was investigated by studying the effects of the leaf methanol and aqueous extracts on seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole, bicuculline, picrotoxin, N-methyl-DL-aspartic acid and strychnine in mice. Both methanol and aqueous extracts of Z. capense significantly antagonized (p<0.05-0.005) seizures induced by pentylenetrazole (PTZ), picrotoxin and strychnine. Methanol extract of Z. capense significantly antagonized (p<0.05) bicuculline-induced seizures while the aqueous extract significantly delayed (p<0.001) the onset of the seizures. Both methanol and aqueous extracts of the plant species significantly delayed (p<0.05-0.005) the onset of N-methyl-DL-aspartic acid (NMDLA)-induced seizures. Phenobarbitone and diazepam significantly antagonized (p<0.001) seizures induced by PTZ, bicuculline and picrotoxin but did not alter NMDLA-induced seizures. Phenobarbitone significantly attenuated (p<0.01) strychnine-induced seizures. Phenytoin or dimethylsulfoxide did not alter the seizures induced either by PTZ, bicuculline, picrotoxin, NMDLA or strychnine to any extent. The LD50 value obtained following oral administration of both the leaf aqueous and methanol extracts of Z. capense was above 3200 mg kg-1 and that obtained after intraperitoneal administration was 283.6 mg kg-1. The phytochemical analysis of the plant species revealed the presence of alkaloids, triterpene steroids, reducing sugars, saponins, tannins and quinones. The data obtained indicate that the leaf methanol and aqueous extracts of Z. capense have anticonvulsant activity which may probably involve both GABAergic, glutaminergic and glycinergic mechanisms. The relatively high LD50 value obtained following oral administration of the plant extract shows that it is non-toxic and /or safe in mice.
  M. Deliwe and G.J. Amabeoku
  Syzygium cordatum Hoscht. ex C.Krauss is widely used by traditional medicine practitioners to treat many ailments including diarrhoea and diabetes. Despite the folklore use, little evidence can be found in literature to corroborate the claims of therapeutic success of the plant species. The objective of the study was to investigate the antidiarrhoeal and antidiabetic activities of the leaf aqueous extract of the plant species in mice and rats, respectively. The antidiarrhoeal activity of the leaf aqueous extract of S. cordatum was investigated using castor oil-induced diarrhoeal test. The antidiabetic activity of the plant extract was studied using streptozotoxin-induced diabetes in rats. Acute toxicity study of plant extract was also carried out using a standard method. Leaf aqueous extract of S. cordatum significantly reduced the number of diarrhoeal episodes, decreased the stool mass and delayed the onset of castor oil-induced diarrhoea in mice. Loperamide was shown to protect the animals against castor oil-induced diarrhoea. Both the leaf aqueous extract of S. cordatum and chlorpropamide significantly lowered the blood glucose levels in both normal and streptozotoxin-induced diabetic rats. The LD50 value obtained for the plant extract was over 4000 mg kg-1 orally. The results obtained suggest that the leaf aqueous extract of S. cordatum has both antidiarrhoeal and antidiabetic activities. This justifies the folklore use of the plant species by traditional medicine practitioners to treat diarrhoea and diabetes. The relatively high LD50 value obtained for the leaf aqueous extract shows that the plant species is non toxic to mice.
  A.H. Ahmad and G.J. Amabeoku
  The possible involvement of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), in the anticonvulsant effect of Ruta graveolens L. was investigated by studying the effect of the leaf methanol extract against seizures elicited by either pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), bicuculline, picrotoxin or N-Methyl-DL-Aspartic acid (NMDLA) in mice. Leaf methanol extract of Ruta graveolens, phenobarbitone, diazepam and muscimol significantly antagonized seizures induced by PTZ, bicuculline or picrotoxin. Combined treatment of sub-effective doses of R. graveolens and muscimol significantly antagonized seizures induced by PTZ, bicuculline or picrotoxin. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or phenytoin did not significantly affect the seizures produced by PTZ, bicuculline or picrotoxin. Ruta graveolens, phenobarbitone, diazepam, phenytoin or DMSO did not significantly affect seizures produced by NMDLA. LY233053 significantly antagonized seizures produced by NMDLA. Combined treatment of sub-effective doses of LY233053 and Ruta graveolens did not significantly alter NMDLA-induced seizures. The phytochemical qualitative analysis of the plant species showed the presence of tannins, cardiac glycosides, saponins, flavonoids, triterpene steroids and alkaloids. The LD50 value obtained following oral administration of the leaf methanol extract of R. graveolens was above 4000 mg kg-1. The HPLC fingerprint of the plant species revealed certain characteristic peaks at 350 nm. The data obtained in this study, indicate that the leaf methanol extract of R. graveolens has anticonvulsant activity. The data obtained also indicate that GABA mechanism may probably be involved in the anticonvulsant effect of the plant extract. The relatively high LD50 obtained for the plant species, given orally, indicates that it is safe in mice.
 
 
 
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