Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by G.H. Chen
Total Records ( 5 ) for G.H. Chen
  B.C. LI , H. Chen , X.J. Xiao , Wei Han , Qi Xu , Wu Xinsheng , Wenbin Bao and G.H. Chen
  The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three cryorotectants (at three concentration each) and two cryopreservation protocols on the preservation of chicken Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs) from gonads at stage 19 and stage 28. The PGCs were cryopreserved using Dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO; 10%, 20%, 30%), glycol (GLY; 10%, 20%, 30%), polyethylene glycol (PEG; 10%, 20%, 30%). In a first series of experiments, we compared viability after three cryorotectants based protocol I and found the viability of PGCs showed very significant percentage (86.53%) (p<0.01) in a freezing media IV. We then compared an cryopreserve protocol I with 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)+5% Glycol versus a cryoprotectant protocol II and observed a better viability with the former protocol (85.9% versus 67.4%, p<0.05). Finally, we compared viability of PGCs at three concentration each cryorotectant and found no significant difference p>0.05 between the concentration of 10% and 15% except freezing media III. When the concentration was 20%, the viability of PGCs was the lowest and showed significant difference p<0.05 or very significant difference (p<0.01) compared to other concentration. In conclusion, 5% DMSO+5%GLY with cryopreserve protocol I was the most effective cryopreservation for chicken primordial germ cells.
  S. Ommeh , L.N. Jin , H. Eding , F.C. Muchadeyi , S. Sulandari , M.S.A. Zein , G. Danbaro , C.E. Wani , S.G. Zhao , Q.H. Nie , X.Q. Zhang , M. Ndila , R. Preisinger , G.H. Chen , I.A. Yousif , K.-N. Heo , S.J. Oh , M. Tapio , D. Masiga , O. Hanotte , H. Jianlin and S. Weigend
  An A/G Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) at position 1,892 of the Mx gene coding sequence has been linked to susceptibility/resistance to avian viral infection in vitro. Using PCR-RFLP and sequencing methods, 1,946 samples from 109 populations from Asia, Africa and Europe; grouped as indigenous village, commercial, fancy chicken as well as wild junglefowl were genotyped for the polymorphism. Allele and genotype frequencies were calculated. Only the G allele was present in Ceylon junglefowl Gallus lafayetti. Using the wild red junglefowl G. gallus population as reference, we assessed if the A/G alleles and genotypes frequencies have been affected by the breeding history and the geographic dispersion of domestic chicken. Within group variation was high but overall there were no significant variation in distribution of alleles and genotypes frequencies between the red junglefowl and indigenous village chickens (p>0.1946), with the exception of the East Asian group (p<0.0001). However, allele and genotype frequencies were significantly different between the red junglefowl and the commercial or fancy groups (p<0.0001). A small but significant negative correlation (r = - 0.166, p<0.0003) was observed between allelic and geographic distance matrices amongst indigenous village chicken populations. Human selection and genetic drift are likely the main factors having shaped today’s observed allele and genotype frequencies in commercial and fancy breeds. In indigenous village chicken and red junglefowl, we propose that both A and G alleles have been maintained by natural selection for disease resistance through a balancing selection mechanism.
  X.S. Wu , H. Wu , B.C. Li , G.Y. Zhou , S.Y. Sun , J. Qin , G.H. Chen and H.H. Musa
  To isolate, purify and culture spermotogonia from chicken testicular tissues, a procedure of enzymatic digestion and percoll density centrifugation was adopted for the single cell suspension to obtain purified spermatogonia. The results showed that, using the same purification method, the purity of spermatogonia gained from 6 days old chicken embryo was more than from 13, 15 and 19 days of age; adhesion purification step led to a harvest of 82% of total spermatogonia, which was 15.6% higher than that of direct isolation method; the adhesion time and survival time of spermotogonia before percoll density gradient centrifugation was earlier and longer than after precoll density gradient centrifugation.
  X.S. Wu , W.B. Bao , J.T. Shu , Q. Xu , X.Y. Zhang , W. Han and G.H. Chen
  This study was designed to investigate the effect of Adenylosuccinate Lyase (ADSL) gene on Inosine Monophosphate content (IMP) in chicken. The chickens used for the study included exogenous Recessive White chicken and Chinese indigenous chicken breeds such as Silkies, Baier, Tibetan and Xiaoshan chickens. A pair of primer was designed to detect exon 2 of ADSL gene by PCR-SSCP and mutation detected was directly sequenced. A synonymous mutation at 3484 bp in exon 2 was substituted C/T SNP. In five chicken breeds, three genotypes TT, CT and CC were observed in exon 2. Muscle IMP content of individuals with TT genotype in exon 2 had significantly higher than those with CT and CC genotypes (p<0.05). In exon 2, Recessive White, Xiaoshan and Baier chickens were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p>0.05) and Silkies and Tibetan chickens were significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p<0.01).
  G.S. Hu , G.B. Chang , Y. Zhang , J. Hong , Y. Liu and G.H. Chen
  The present research was to study the association of polymorphism of Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein1 (Nramp1) with some immune functions in Rugao chicken (RG) and Recessive White chicken (RW). The PCR-SSCP technique was applied to analyze the correlation between the polymorphisms of Nramp1 gene and immune functions (Heterophil/Lymphocyte (H/L), lymphocyte transformation rate and the content of IgM) in 72 RG and 55 RW. The results showed that: the Heterophil/Lymphocyte (H/L), lymphocyte transformation rate and the content of IgM in RG and RW showed significant differences (p<0.05). H/L of AA was significantly lower than BB and AB while the AA’s lymphocyte transformation rate and IgM were significantly higher than the BB’s in both RG and RW. The results demonstrated that the general immune performances of RG were superior to those of RW. The general immune performances of AA were superior to BB and AB.
 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility