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Articles by G. M Dallinga Thie
Total Records ( 3 ) for G. M Dallinga Thie
  A. P Beigneux , R Franssen , A Bensadoun , P Gin , K Melford , J Peter , R. L Walzem , M. M Weinstein , B. S.J Davies , J. A Kuivenhoven , J. J.P Kastelein , L. G Fong , G. M Dallinga Thie and S. G. Young
 

Objective— GPIHBP1 is an endothelial cell protein that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and chylomicrons. Because GPIHBP1 deficiency causes chylomicronemia in mice, we sought to determine whether some cases of chylomicronemia in humans could be attributable to defective GPIHBP1 proteins.

Methods and Results— Patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (n=60, with plasma triglycerides above the 95th percentile for age and gender) were screened for mutations in GPIHBP1. A homozygous GPIHBP1 mutation (c.344A>C) that changed a highly conserved glutamine at residue 115 to a proline (p.Q115P) was identified in a 33-year-old male with lifelong chylomicronemia. The patient had failure-to-thrive as a child but had no history of pancreatitis. He had no mutations in LPL, APOA5, or APOC2. The Q115P substitution did not affect the ability of GPIHBP1 to reach the cell surface. However, unlike wild-type GPIHBP1, GPIHBP1-Q115P lacked the ability to bind LPL or chylomicrons (d < 1.006 g/mL lipoproteins from Gpihbp1–/– mice). Mouse GPIHBP1 with the corresponding mutation (Q114P) also could not bind LPL.

Conclusions— A homozygous missense mutation in GPIHBP1 (Q115P) was identified in a patient with chylomicronemia. The mutation eliminated the ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL and chylomicrons, strongly suggesting that it caused the patient’s chylomicronemia.

  A. Q Reuwer , M. T Twickler , B. A Hutten , F. W Molema , N. J Wareham , G. M Dallinga Thie , R. L Bogorad , V Goffin , M Smink Bol , J. J.P Kastelein , S. M Boekholdt and K. T. Khaw
 

Background— Prolactin is increasingly recognized to play a stimulatory role in the inflammatory response. Because inflammation is considered of crucial importance in the development of atherosclerosis, we aimed to evaluate whether prolactin levels are associated with the occurrence of coronary artery disease (CAD).

Methods and Results— We performed a nested case-control study in the prospective EPIC-Norfolk cohort. Cases were apparently healthy men and women, aged 45 to 79 years, who developed fatal or nonfatal CAD (n=882). Controls remained free of CAD (n=1490). Overall, systemic prolactin levels did not differ between cases and controls, and people in the highest prolactin tertile did not have a significantly increased risk of developing future CAD (in men, odds ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.61; in women, odds ratio, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.64). However, in a separate immunohistochemical study, the presence of prolactin receptors could be demonstrated in postmortem human coronary artery plaques (preliminary data).

Conclusions— Elevated systemic prolactin levels do not predict CAD in the general population. However, prolactin receptors were found in human coronary artery plaques. This observation may indicate a role of prolactin within atherosclerotic plaques. More studies are needed to define the possible role of prolactin in atherosclerotic plaque development.

  R Franssen , S. G Young , F Peelman , J Hertecant , J. A Sierts , A. W. M Schimmel , A Bensadoun , J. J. P Kastelein , L. G Fong , G. M Dallinga Thie and A. P. Beigneux
 

Background— Recent studies in mice have established that an endothelial cell protein, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1), is essential for the lipolytic processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins.

Methods and Results— We report the discovery of a homozygous missense mutation in GPIHBP1 in a young boy with severe chylomicronemia. The mutation, p.C65Y, replaces a conserved cysteine in the GPIHBP1 lymphocyte antigen 6 domain with a tyrosine and is predicted to perturb protein structure by interfering with the formation of a disulfide bond. Studies with transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that GPIHBP1-C65Y reaches the cell surface but has lost the ability to bind lipoprotein lipase (LPL). When the GPIHBP1-C65Y homozygote was given an intravenous bolus of heparin, only trace amounts of LPL entered the plasma. We also observed very low levels of LPL in the postheparin plasma of a subject with chylomicronemia who was homozygous for a different GPIHBP1 mutation (p.Q115P). When the GPIHBP1-Q115P homozygote was given a 6-hour infusion of heparin, a significant amount of LPL appeared in the plasma, resulting in a fall in the plasma triglyceride levels from 1780 to 120 mg/dL.

Conclusions— We identified a novel GPIHBP1 missense mutation (p.C65Y) associated with defective LPL binding in a young boy with severe chylomicronemia. We also show that homozygosity for the C65Y or Q115P mutations is associated with low levels of LPL in the postheparin plasma, demonstrating that GPIHBP1 is important for plasma triglyceride metabolism in humans.

 
 
 
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