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Articles by G Thanassoulis
Total Records ( 3 ) for G Thanassoulis
  G Thanassoulis , J. M Massaro , C. J O'Donnell , U Hoffmann , D Levy , P. T Ellinor , T. J Wang , R. B Schnabel , R. S Vasan , C. S Fox and E. J. Benjamin
  Background—

Obesity represents an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF). We tested the hypothesis that pericardial fat, a unique fat deposit in close anatomic proximity to cardiac structures and autonomic fibers, is associated with prevalent AF.

Methods and Results—

Participants from the Framingham Heart Study underwent multidetector computed tomography from 2002 to 2005. We estimated the association between quantitative pericardial, intrathoracic and visceral adipose tissue volumes (per standard deviation of volume) with prevalent AF adjusting for established AF risk factors (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, blood pressure treatment, PR interval, and clinically significant valvular disease). Of the 3217 eligible participants (mean age, 50.6±10.1 years; 48% women), 54 had a confirmed diagnosis of AF. Pericardial fat but not intrathoracic or visceral abdominal fat was associated with prevalent AF in multivariable-adjusted models (odds ratio per standard deviation of pericardial fat volume, 1.28; 95% confidence intervals, 1.03 to 1.58). Further adjustments for body mass index, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and intrathoracic fat volume did not materially change the association between pericardial fat and AF.

Conclusions—

Pericardial fat was associated with prevalent AF even after adjustment for AF risk factors, including body mass index. If this association is replicated, further investigations into the mechanisms linking pericardial fat to AF are merited.

  G Thanassoulis , J. M Massaro , U Hoffmann , A. A Mahabadi , R. S Vasan , C. J O'Donnell and C. S. Fox
  Background—

Pericardial and intrathoracic fat depots may represent novel risk factors for obesity-related cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine the prevalence, distribution, and risk factor correlates of high pericardial and intrathoracic fat deposits.

Methods and Results—

Participants from the Framingham Heart Study (n=3312; mean age, 52 years; 48% women) underwent multidetector CT imaging in 2002 to 2005; high pericardial and high intrathoracic fat were defined on the basis of the sex-specific 90th percentile for these fat depots in a healthy reference sample. For men and women, the prevalence of high pericardial fat was 29.3% and 26.3%, respectively, and high intrathoracic fat was 31.4% and 35.3%, respectively. Overall, 22.1% of the sample was discordant for pericardial and intrathoracic fat depots: 8.3% had high pericardial but normal intrathoracic fat and 13.8% had high intrathoracic but normal pericardial fat. Higher body mass index, higher waist circumference, and increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome were more prevalent in participants with high intrathoracic fat depots than with high pericardial fat (P<0.05 for all comparisons). High abdominal visceral adipose tissue was more frequent in participants with high intrathoracic adipose tissue compared with those with high pericardial fat (P<0.001). Intrathoracic fat but not waist circumference was more highly correlated with visceral adipose tissue (r=0.76 and 0.78 in men and women, respectively; P<0.0001) than with subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) (r=0.46 and 0.54 in men and women, respectively; P<0.0001).

Conclusions—

Although prevalence of pericardial fat and intrathoracic fat were comparable at 30%, intrathoracic fat correlated more closely with metabolic risk and visceral fat. Intrathoracic fat may be a potential marker of metabolic risk and visceral fat on thoracic imaging.

  G Thanassoulis , I Karp , K Humphries , J. V Tu , M. J Eisenberg and L. Pilote
 

Background— Prescription plans frequently use restrictive strategies to control drug expenditures. Increased restrictions may reduce access to evidence-based therapy among patients with chronic disease. We sought to evaluate the impact of increased restrictions on medication use among heart failure (HF) patients.

Methods and Results— We conducted a population-based cohort study of administrative data from 3 Canadian provinces. During 1998 to 2001, Quebec (QC) had a minimally restrictive plan, whereas Ontario (ON) and British Columbia (BC) had more restrictive prescription plans. We evaluated drug use at 30 days of discharge stratified by prescription plan. Provincial rates of filled prescriptions for HF drugs in QC, ON, and BC were 62%, 58%, and 47% for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; 34%, 22%, and 16% for β-blockers; 9%, 5%, and 3% for angiotensin receptor blockers; and 79%, 76%, and 62% for loop diuretics, respectively. In multivariate analyses, patients residing in provinces with restrictive plans were less likely to be prescribed drugs that were restricted, such as β-blockers (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.60; 0.36, 0.29 to 0.44, for ON and BC, respectively) and angiotensin receptor blockers (0.50, 0.45 to 0.56; 0.38, 0.32 to 0.46, for ON and BC, respectively), than drugs with no restrictions, such as loop diuretics (0.81, 0.74 to 0.88; 0.40, 0.36 to 0.45, for ON and BC, respectively) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (0.80, 0.75 to 0.86; 0.47, 0.43 to 0.52, for ON and BC, respectively).

Conclusion— Among HF patients, residing in a province with a more restrictive prescription plan may be associated with lower use of restricted HF medications over and above the expected regional differences in HF drug use across provinces.

 
 
 
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