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Articles by G Brown
Total Records ( 3 ) for G Brown
  L Brown , G Brown , P Vacek and S. Brown
 

Background: Cell-free fetal nucleic acid, believed to be derived from the placenta/trophoblast, is present in the plasma of pregnant women; however, its use for predictive genetic testing has been severely limited because the circulating fetal DNA is present in a small quantity and mixed with a much larger quantity of maternal DNA. Methods for detecting fetal aneuploidy from the cell-free fetal DNA in plasma are highly sought after, but proposed methods must take into account the small quantity and highly contaminated nature of the available fetal DNA.

Methods: We developed a method for methylation-sensitive amplification of DNA suitable for use with small (approximately 1 ng) samples. We used this method in conjunction with 2-color microarray analysis with a custom-made array to investigate whether relative amplification, and hence relative methylation, could be evaluated for a large number of genomic loci.

Results: Microarray assessment of genomic methylation accurately predicted the degree of methylation measured with bisulfite-conversion PCR and confirmed that DNA from first-trimester trophoblast was generally hypomethylated compared with whole-blood DNA. With a series of 3 samples in which 1 ng of DNA from a trisomic first trimester placenta was mixed with 9 ng of chromosomally normal peripheral blood DNA, we observed that the microarray signal associated with the trisomic chromosome was significantly different from that of the other chromosomes (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: This method has potential to be used for noninvasive detection of fetal aneuploidy.

  K. D Pruitt , J Harrow , R. A Harte , C Wallin , M Diekhans , D. R Maglott , S Searle , C. M Farrell , J. E Loveland , B. J Ruef , E Hart , M. M Suner , M. J Landrum , B Aken , S Ayling , R Baertsch , J Fernandez Banet , J. L Cherry , V Curwen , M DiCuccio , M Kellis , J Lee , M. F Lin , M Schuster , A Shkeda , C Amid , G Brown , O Dukhanina , A Frankish , J Hart , B. L Maidak , J Mudge , M. R Murphy , T Murphy , J Rajan , B Rajput , L. D Riddick , C Snow , C Steward , D Webb , J. A Weber , L Wilming , W Wu , E Birney , D Haussler , T Hubbard , J Ostell , R Durbin and D. Lipman
 

Effective use of the human and mouse genomes requires reliable identification of genes and their products. Although multiple public resources provide annotation, different methods are used that can result in similar but not identical representation of genes, transcripts, and proteins. The collaborative consensus coding sequence (CCDS) project tracks identical protein annotations on the reference mouse and human genomes with a stable identifier (CCDS ID), and ensures that they are consistently represented on the NCBI, Ensembl, and UCSC Genome Browsers. Importantly, the project coordinates on manually reviewing inconsistent protein annotations between sites, as well as annotations for which new evidence suggests a revision is needed, to progressively converge on a complete protein-coding set for the human and mouse reference genomes, while maintaining a high standard of reliability and biological accuracy. To date, the project has identified 20,159 human and 17,707 mouse consensus coding regions from 17,052 human and 16,893 mouse genes. Three evaluation methods indicate that the entries in the CCDS set are highly likely to represent real proteins, more so than annotations from contributing groups not included in CCDS. The CCDS database thus centralizes the function of identifying well-supported, identically-annotated, protein-coding regions.

  Temple The MGC Project Team , D. S Gerhard , R Rasooly , E. A Feingold , P. J Good , C Robinson , A Mandich , J. G Derge , J Lewis , D Shoaf , F. S Collins , W Jang , L Wagner , C. M Shenmen , L Misquitta , C. F Schaefer , K. H Buetow , T. I Bonner , L Yankie , M Ward , L Phan , A Astashyn , G Brown , C Farrell , J Hart , M Landrum , B. L Maidak , M Murphy , T Murphy , B Rajput , L Riddick , D Webb , J Weber , W Wu , K. D Pruitt , D Maglott , A Siepel , B Brejova , M Diekhans , R Harte , R Baertsch , J Kent , D Haussler , M Brent , L Langton , C. L.G Comstock , M Stevens , C Wei , M. J van Baren , K Salehi Ashtiani , R. R Murray , L Ghamsari , E Mello , C Lin , C Pennacchio , K Schreiber , N Shapiro , A Marsh , E Pardes , T Moore , A Lebeau , M Muratet , B Simmons , D Kloske , S Sieja , J Hudson , P Sethupathy , M Brownstein , N Bhat , J Lazar , H Jacob , C. E Gruber , M. R Smith , J McPherson , A. M Garcia , P. H Gunaratne , J Wu , D Muzny , R. A Gibbs , A. C Young , G. G Bouffard , R. W Blakesley , J Mullikin , E. D Green , M. C Dickson , A. C Rodriguez , J Grimwood , J Schmutz , R. M Myers , M Hirst , T Zeng , K Tse , M Moksa , M Deng , K Ma , D Mah , J Pang , G Taylor , E Chuah , A Deng , K Fichter , A Go , S Lee , J Wang , M Griffith , R Morin , R. A Moore , M Mayo , S Munro , S Wagner , S. J.M Jones , R. A Holt , M. A Marra , S Lu , S Yang , J Hartigan , M Graf , R Wagner , S Letovksy , J. C Pulido , K Robison , D Esposito , J Hartley , V. E Wall , R. F Hopkins , O Ohara and S. Wiemann
 

Since its start, the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) has sought to provide at least one full-protein-coding sequence cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene with a RefSeq transcript, and at least 6200 rat genes. The MGC cloning effort initially relied on random expressed sequence tag screening of cDNA libraries. Here, we summarize our recent progress using directed RT-PCR cloning and DNA synthesis. The MGC now contains clones with the entire protein-coding sequence for 92% of human and 89% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq (NM-accession) transcripts, and for 97% of human and 96% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq transcripts that have one or more PubMed publications, in addition to clones for more than 6300 rat genes. These high-quality MGC clones and their sequences are accessible without restriction to researchers worldwide.

 
 
 
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