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Articles by Fitra Yosi
Total Records ( 5 ) for Fitra Yosi
  Fitra Yosi , Tuti Widjastuti and Hendi Setiyatwan
  Background and Objective: Broiler reared above the condition of thermoneutral zone will be vulnerable to environmental heat stress and exhibit behavioural and physiological changes. This study is to evaluate the effects of supplementation of potassium chloride (KCl) in drinking water on broiler performance and physiological responses under conditions of environmental heat stress. Methodology: A total of 200 days old broiler chicks were evaluated in this study. They were randomly divided into 20 plots and reared for 5 weeks. A completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 4 replications were assigned in this study. The treatments were symbolized as R0, R1, R2, R3 and R4, which is respectively supplemented with KCl as much as 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00% (w/v) in drinking water. Variables observed were feed and water intake, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, the amount of potassium, sodium and chloride absorbed, mortality, the panting percentage, cloacal temperature, numbers of leukocytes and blood pH. Results: The results indicated that the supplementation of KCl in drinking water did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the panting percentage, however, significantly (p<0.05) affected the feed and water intake, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, the amount of potassium, sodium and chloride absorbed, cloacal temperature, numbers of leukocytes and blood pH. Conclusion: It was concluded that the supplementation of 0.50% KCl in drinking water was the optimal level for improving performance and physiological response of broiler chickens under environmental heat stress condition.
  Fitra Yosi , Sofia Sandi , Miksusanti , Nasir Rofiq and Sutejo
  The aim of this study was to evaluate the digestibility of nutrients in the diets of Pegagan ducks fermented with a various of yeast inoculum. The yeast varieties used included tape yeast, tempe yeast and bread yeast. This study evaluated 200 female Pegagan ducks aged 2 weeks who were reared for 5 weeks. A completely randomized design (CRD) was used that consisted of 5 treatments and 4 replications. Treatment rations given were as R0 (commercial ration/control), R1 (locally sourced ration without fermentation), R2 (locally sourced ration fermented with bread yeast), R3 (locally sourced ration fermented with tape yeast) and R4 (locally sourced ration fermented with the tempe yeast). The variables observed included the digestibility coefficient of dry matter (DCDM), organic matter (DCOM), crude fiber (DCCFb), crude protein (DCCP), crude fat (DCCFt), N-free extract digestibility (NFED), nitrogen-corrected metabolizable energy (NCME) and nitrogen retention (NR). Data were analyzed using analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by Duncan's multiple range test at 5%. The DCDM, DCOM, DCCFb, DCCP, DCCFt, NFED, NCME and NR values were affected by treatment (p<0.05). The DCDM, DCOM, DCCFb, DCCP, DCCFt, NFED, NCME and NR values between locally sourced ration fermented with bread yeast (R2), tape yeast (R3) and tempe yeast (R4) were not significantly different (p>0.05). The fermentation process using three types of inoculant yeast (tape yeast, tempe yeast and bread yeast) did not increase nutrient digestibility in pegagan ducks.
  Sofia Sandi , Fitra Yosi , Meisji Liana Sari , Nuni Gofar and Muhamad Nasir Rofiq
  Background and Objective: Swamp forages are a potentially good quality poultry feed source and organic acids produced by fermentation determine the quality of the silage as a dietary source. This study was conducted to determine the organic acid profile in swamp forage silage and the effect of silage liquid organic acid salts on pathogenic bacteria drag zones. Materials and Methods: A completely randomized design was used consisting of threes wamp forage silage treatment groups with five replications: P1 (100% Hymenachne acutigluma), P2 (50%:50% H. acutigluma: Neptunia oleracea Lour) and P3 (100% N. oleracea Lour). The silage with the best organic acid profile was then reacted with NaOH (pH 10-12), Ca(OH)2 (pH 4.6-4.8) and ZnO (pH 4.6-4.8) to produce organic acid salts. Total lactic acid bacteria, acidity (total amount and pH), organic acidprofiles (lactic, acetic and butyric acid), total organic acid salt and pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium) in drag zones after in vitro treatment with organic acid salt extracts were measured. Results: P1 silage had the highest total lactic acid bacteria, total acid and lactic acid content (p<0.05) and lowest butyric acid levels (p>0.05). Though not significantly different between treatments, acetic and butyric acid levels of all silages exceeded standards for good quality. Addition of ZnO to P1 silage liquid produced the most organic acid salt (p<0.05 versus NaOH) with the lowest pH (p<0.05 versus NaOH and Ca(OH)2]. ZnO-derived organic acid salt extracts produced the largest drag zone (greatest growth inhibition) for both E. coli [p<0.05 versus NaOH and Ca(OH)2] and S. Typhimurium (p<0.05 versus NaOH), while NaOH produced the smallest. Conclusion: Hymenachne acutigluma (P1) swamp silage had the best organic acid profile due to a higher amount of active lactic acid bacteria. Furthermore, addition of 12.5% ZnO to P1 silage liquid resulted in organic salt with the lowest pH and optimal inhibition of E. coli and S. typhimurium growth. These results indicate that Hymenachne swamp forage silage can be used as an alternative feed additive (organic acid salt) which is good for poultry.
  Sofia Sandi , Fitra Yosi and Miksusanti
  This study examined locally sourced raw materials that were either fermented or not with different inoculums to determine the effect of diet on performance and protein efficiency ratio in young Pegagan ducks. A completely randomized design (CRD) with 5 treatments and 4 replications was used to examine five rations: R0, commercial ration (control), R1; locally sourced ration without fermentation; R2, locally sourced ration fermented with bread yeast; R3, locally sourced ration fermented with tape yeast and R4, locally sourced ration fermented with tempeh yeast. Variables measured were final body weight, feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion, protein intake, protein digestibility, protein degradation and protein efficiency ratio. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Duncan’s multiple range test. The use of locally sourced raw material feed fermented using different inoculums had significantly difference (p<0.05) on the final body weight, weight gain, feed conversion, protein digestibility, protein degradation and protein efficiency ratio, but did not have significantly difference (p>0.05) on feed and protein intake of Pegagan ducks. It was concluded that the use of local raw material feed fermented with different inoculums had the same result on increase the final body weight, body weight gain, feed conversion, protein digestibility, protein degradation and protein efficiency ratio in Pegagan ducks.
  Afnur Imsya , Muhakka and Fitra Yosi
  The use of total mixed fiber (TMF) in feed production involves mixing of forages from agricultural byproducts that have different fiber fractions, nutritional values and availabilities. The forage materials used in this study were rice straw, palm oil fronds and swamp grass. Here we tested: (1) TMF composition of single samples and (2) TMF of different rations based on the forage materials they contained. The study used in vitro methods and randomized group design to evaluate 5 replicates of 4 different feed rations. The ration compositions were: Ration 1 (R1) = 40% kumpai tembaga swamp grass + 20% rice straw; Ration 2 (R2) = 40% swamp grass + 20% palm oil frond; Ration 3 (R3) = 20% swamp grass + 20% rice straw + 20% palm oil frond; Ration 4 (R4) = 30% rice straw + 30% palm oil frond, which were then added to a standard feed concentrate. In vitro methods were used to measure methane gas production, digestibility of dry matter (DMD), organic matter (OMD) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF, NDFD), as well as NH3-N and partial volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations. The results showed that, relative to rations with rice straw and palm oil frond, rations with kumpai tembaga grass produced higher concentrations of acetic, propionic and butyric acid (16.10 mM, 6.05 mM and 5.99, respectively) as well as 9.68 mM methane gas. The optimal TMF composition was 20% swamp grass, 20% rice straw and 20% palm oil frond, which produced 36.32% DMD, 35.96% OMD, 17.86% NDFD and 10.84 mM NH3-N, as well as 12.39 mM acetic acid, 4.39 mM propionic acid, 4.36 mM butyric acid VFAs and 6.91 mM methane gas.
 
 
 
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