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Articles by F Valldeoriola
Total Records ( 2 ) for F Valldeoriola
  Y Compta , J Santamaria , L Ratti , E Tolosa , A Iranzo , E Munoz , F Valldeoriola , R Casamitjana , J Rios and M. J. Marti
 

Excessive daytime sleepiness is common in Parkinson's disease and has been associated with Parkinson's disease-related dementia. Narcoleptic features have been observed in Parkinson's disease patients with excessive daytime sleepiness and hypocretin cell loss has been found in the hypothalamus of Parkinson's disease patients, in association with advanced disease. However, studies on cerebrospinal fluid levels of hypocretin-1 (orexin A) in Parkinson's disease have been inconclusive. Reports of sleep studies in Parkinson's disease patients with and without excessive daytime sleepiness have also been disparate, pointing towards a variety of causes underlying excessive daytime sleepiness. In this study, we aimed to measure cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels in Parkinson's disease patients with and without dementia and to study their relationship to dementia and clinical excessive daytime sleepiness, as well as to describe potentially related sleep architecture changes. Twenty-one Parkinson's disease patients without dementia and 20 Parkinson's disease patients with dementia, along with 22 control subjects without sleep complaints, were included. Both Epworth sleepiness scale, obtained with the help of the caregivers, and mini-mental state examination were recorded. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels were measured in all individuals using a radio-immunoassay technique. Additionally, eight Parkinson's disease patients without dementia and seven Parkinson's disease patients with dementia underwent video-polysomnogram and multiple sleep latencies test. Epworth sleepiness scale scores were higher in Parkinson's disease patients without dementia and Parkinson's disease patients with dementia than controls (P < 0.01) and scores >10 were more frequent in Parkinson's disease patients with dementia than in Parkinson's disease patients without dementia (P = 0.04). Cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels were similar among groups (controls = 321.15 ± 47.15 pg/ml; without dementia = 300.99 ± 58.68 pg/ml; with dementia = 309.94 ± 65.95 pg/ml; P = 0.67), and unrelated to either epworth sleepiness scale or mini-mental state examination. Dominant occipital frequency awake was slower in Parkinson's disease patients with dementia than Parkinson's disease patients without dementia (P = 0.05). Presence of slow dominant occipital frequency and/or loss of normal non-rapid eye movement sleep architecture was more frequent among Parkinson's disease patients with dementia (P = 0.029). Thus, excessive daytime sleepiness is more frequent in Parkinson's disease patients with dementia than Parkinson's disease patients without dementia, but lumbar cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels are normal and unrelated to severity of sleepiness or the cognitive status. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid does not accurately reflect the hypocretin cell loss known to occur in the hypothalamus of advanced Parkinson's disease. Alternatively, mechanisms other than hypocretin cells dysfunction may be responsible for excessive daytime sleepiness and the sleep architecture alterations seen in these patients.

  L Timmermann , K. A. M Pauls , K Wieland , R Jech , G Kurlemann , N Sharma , S. S Gill , C. A Haenggeli , S. J Hayflick , P Hogarth , K. L Leenders , P Limousin , C. J Malanga , E Moro , J. L Ostrem , F. J Revilla , P Santens , A Schnitzler , S Tisch , F Valldeoriola , J Vesper , J Volkmann , Woitalla and S. Peker
 

Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation encompasses a heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Severe generalized dystonia is frequently a prominent symptom and can be very disabling, causing gait impairment, difficulty with speech and swallowing, pain and respiratory distress. Several case reports and one case series have been published concerning therapeutic outcome of pallidal deep brain stimulation in dystonia caused by neurodegeneration with brain iron degeneration, reporting mostly favourable outcomes. However, with case studies, there may be a reporting bias towards favourable outcome. Thus, we undertook this multi-centre retrospective study to gather worldwide experiences with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. A total of 16 centres contributed 23 patients with confirmed neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation and bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation. Patient details including gender, age at onset, age at operation, genetic status, magnetic resonance imaging status, history and clinical findings were requested. Data on severity of dystonia (Burke Fahn Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale—Motor Scale, Barry Albright Dystonia Scale), disability (Burke Fahn Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale—Disability Scale), quality of life (subjective global rating from 1 to 10 obtained retrospectively from patient and caregiver) as well as data on supportive therapy, concurrent pharmacotherapy, stimulation settings, adverse events and side effects were collected. Data were collected once preoperatively and at 2–6 and 9–15 months postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was change in severity of dystonia. The mean improvement in severity of dystonia was 28.5% at 2–6 months and 25.7% at 9–15 months. At 9–15 months postoperatively, 66.7% of patients showed an improvement of 20% or more in severity of dystonia, and 31.3% showed an improvement of 20% or more in disability. Global quality of life ratings showed a median improvement of 83.3% at 9–15 months. Severity of dystonia preoperatively and disease duration predicted improvement in severity of dystonia at 2–6 months; this failed to reach significance at 9–15 months. The study confirms that dystonia in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation improves with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation, although this improvement is not as great as the benefit reported in patients with primary generalized dystonias or some other secondary dystonias. The patients with more severe dystonia seem to benefit more. A well-controlled, multi-centre prospective study is necessary to enable evidence-based therapeutic decisions and better predict therapeutic outcomes.

 
 
 
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