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Articles by F Rengo
Total Records ( 2 ) for F Rengo
  G Testa , F Cacciatore , G Galizia , D Della Morte , F Mazzella , S Russo , N Ferrara , F Rengo and P. Abete
 

Background: comorbidity plays a critical role in the high mortality for chronic heart failure (CHF) in the elderly. Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) is the most extensively studied comorbidity index. No studies are available on the ability of CCI to predict mortality in CHF elderly subjects. The aim of the present study was to assess if CCI was able to predict long-term mortality in a random sample of elderly CHF subjects.

Methods: long-term mortality after 12-year follow-up in 125 subjects with CHF and 1,143 subjects without CHF was studied. Comorbidity was evaluated using CCI.

Findings: in elderly subjects stratified for CCI (1–3 and ≥4), mortality was higher in non-CHF subjects with CCI ≥4 (52.4% versus 70%, P < 0.002) but not in those with CHF (75.9% versus 77.6%, P = 0.498, NS). Cox regression analysis on 12 years mortality indicated that both CCI (HR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.01–1.31; P = 0.035) and CHF (HR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.04–8.83; P = 0.003) were predictive of mortality. When Cox analysis was performed by selecting the presence and the absence of CHF, CCI was predictive of mortality in the absence but not in the presence of CHF.

Conclusion: CCI does not predict long-term mortality in elderly subjects with CHF.

  A Pilotto , F Addante , M Franceschi , G Leandro , G Rengo , P D'Ambrosio , M. G Longo , F Rengo , F Pellegrini , B Dallapiccola and L. Ferrucci
 

Background— Multidimensional impairment of older patients may influence the clinical outcome of diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) based on a comprehensive geriatric assessment predicts short-term mortality in older patients with heart failure.

Methods and Results— In this prospective study with a 1-month follow-up, 376 patients aged 65 and older with a diagnosis of heart failure were enrolled. A standardized comprehensive geriatric assessment that included information on functional (activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living), cognitive (Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire), and nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment), as well as on risk of pressure sore (Exton-Smith Scale), comorbidities (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale Index), medications, and social support network, was used to calculate the MPI for mortality using a previously validated algorithm. The New York Heart Association, the Enhanced Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment, and the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry regression model scores were also calculated. Higher MPI values were significantly associated with higher 30-day mortality, both in men (MPI-1, 2.8%; MPI-2, 15.3%; MPI-3, 47.4%; P=0.000) and women (MPI-1, 0%; MPI-2, 6.5%; MPI-3, 14.6%; P=0.011). The discrimination of the MPI was also good, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (men: 0.83; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.90; women: 0.80; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.89) greater than receiver operating characteristic areas of New York Heart Association (men: 0.63; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.69; P=0.015; women: 0.65; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.75; P=0.064), Enhanced Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment (men: 0.69; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.79; P=0.045; women: 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.87; P=0.443), and Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry scores (men: 0.65; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.78; P=0.023; women: 0.67; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.83, P=0.171).

Conclusions— The MPI, calculated from information collected in a standardized comprehensive geriatric assessment, is useful to estimate the risk of 1-month mortality in older patients with heart failure.

 
 
 
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