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Articles by Eliot A. Brinton
Total Records ( 7 ) for Eliot A. Brinton
  Eliot A. Brinton , Ping Jiang , Moti Kashyap , Robert Padley , Jeffrey Salon , Roopal Thakkar and Anthony Vo
  not available
  Michael J. Blaha , Roger S. Blumenthal , Eliot A. Brinton and Terry A. Jacobson
  Plasma levels of lipids and lipoproteins are essential to the management of lipid disorders by generalists and by practitioners of the emerging specialty of clinical lipidology. The routine lipid panel consists of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides. Several additional lipid parameters are emerging as potentially valuable adjuncts to the standard panel, including measurements of apolipoproteins and LDL particle size and concentration, but most of these serve mainly as research tools at present. One major exception is non-HDL-C, which is readily available for routine clinical use. This review outlines some of the numerous research studies that clearly establish the clinical utility and even preeminence of non-HDL-C as a comprehensive measure of atherogenic lipoproteins. Non-HDL-C was highlighted as a key secondary goal of therapy several years ago in the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III national lipid treatment guidelines and recently was further emphasized as a major goal of therapy in the consensus guidelines for lipoprotein management in patients with cardiometabolic risk from the American Diabetes Association and the American College of Cardiology. Non-HDL-C is superior to LDL-C for the prediction of cardiovascular events and has many other compelling advantages over LDL-C and other traditional lipid parameters. Importantly, it can be calculated directly from values in routine lipid panels, at no added expense. It is our opinion that non-HDL-C should be reported on all routine lipid profiles and used regularly in the management of dyslipidemia for optimal prevention of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.
  Harold E. Bays , Eliot A. Brinton , Joseph Triscari , Erluo Chen , Darbie Maccubbin , Alexandra MacLean , Kendra Gibson , Amy O. Johnson-Levonas and Yale B. Mitchel
  The degree of glycemic control may alter lipid levels, which might also alter treatment efficacy of lipid agents.
  Jerome D. Cohen , Eliot A. Brinton , Matthew K. Ito and Terry A. Jacobson
 

Background

Statins substantially reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and are generally well-tolerated. Despite this, many patients discontinue therapy. A better understanding of the characteristics of current and former statin users may be helpful for formulating strategies to improve long-term adherence.

Objective

The Understanding Statin Use in America and Gaps in Education (USAGE) survey assessed the attitudes, beliefs, practices, and behavior of current and former statin users.

Methods

Individuals 18 years or older who reported a history of high cholesterol and current or former statin use were identified within a registered consumer panel cohort in the United States and invited to participate in an Internet survey.

Results

Of the 10,138 respondents, 8918 (88%) were current statin users and 1220 (12%) were former users. Participants (mean age 61 years) were predominantly white (92%), female (61%), of middle income (median $44,504/yr), and had health insurance (93%). Among current users, 95% took a statin alone, and 70% had not missed a dose in the past month. Although ∼70% reported that their physicians had explained the importance of cholesterol levels for their heart health former users were less satisfied with the discussions (65% vs. 83%, P < .05). Muscle-related side effects were reported by 60% and 25% of former and current users, respectively (P < .05). Nearly half of all respondents switched statins at least once. The primary reason for switching by current users was cost (32%) and the primary reason for discontinuation was side effects (62%).

Conclusions

This survey provides important insights into behavior and attitudes among current and former statin users and the results suggest that more effective dialogue between healthcare providers and patients may increase persistence of statin use, particularly when the patient has concerns about side effects and drug costs.

  Eliot A. Brinton
  Not available
  Melissa Y. Wei , Matthew K. Ito , Jerome D. Cohen , Eliot A. Brinton and Terry A. Jacobson
 

Background

Although statins have been shown to reduce cardiovascular disease mortality, less than half of U.S. adults achieve their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal. In many patients initiated on a statin, adherence rates decrease over time.

Objective

To characterize current and former statin users, identify reasons for the discontinuation or switching of statins, and identify factors associated with adherence.

Methods

The USAGE survey is a cross-sectional, self-administered Internet-based survey of 10,138 U.S. adults fielded September to October 2011. The following statin users were identified and compared: adherent nonswitchers, adherent switchers, non-adherent switchers, and discontinuers. Univariate and multivariate models using a priori covariates for adherence and discontinuation were examined.

Results

Most participants were current statin users who adhered with their prescribed statin (82.5%, n = 8371). Former statin users or discontinuers (12%, n = 1220) cited muscle pain, a side effect, as the primary reason for discontinuation (60%), followed by cost (16%), and then perceived lack of efficacy (13%). Discontinuers were less satisfied with their physicians' explanation of cholesterol treatment, more likely to use the Internet to research statins, and less likely to undergo frequent cholesterol monitoring. Among adherent statin users, the primary reasons for switching were muscle side effects (33%) and cost (32%). Individuals at risk for non-adherence included those with low household income, those who experienced muscle pain as a side effect while on statin therapy, and those taking medication for cardiovascular disease.

Conclusion

Statin-related muscle side effects are common and contribute significantly to rates of discontinuation, switching, and non-adherence. Improved physician patient communication about side effects and benefits of statins are necessary to improve both adherence and outcomes.

  Matthew K. Ito , Kevin C. Maki , Eliot A. Brinton , Jerome D. Cohen and Terry A. Jacobson
 

Background

Drug interactions have been identified as a risk factor for muscle-related side effects in statin users.

Objectives

The aim was to assess whether use of medications that inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isozymes, organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1), or P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are associated with muscle-related symptoms among current and former statin users.

Methods

Persons (n = 10,138) from the Understanding Statin Use in America and Gaps in Education (USAGE) internet survey were categorized about whether they ever reported new or worsening muscle pain while taking a statin (n = 2935) or ever stopped a statin because of muscle pain (n = 1516). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess associations between use of concomitant therapies that inhibit CYP450 isozymes, OATP1B1, P-gp, or a combination and muscle-related outcomes.

Results

In multivariate analyses, concomitant use of a CYP450 inhibitor was associated with increased odds for new or worse muscle pain (odds ratio [OR] = 1.42; P < .001) or ever having stopped a statin because of muscle pain (OR = 1.28; P = .037). Concomitant use of medication known to inhibit both OATP1B1 and P-gp was also associated with increased odds (OR = 1.80; P = .030) of ever having stopped a statin because of muscle pain.

Conclusions

Concomitant use of medication(s) that inhibit statin metabolism was associated with increased odds of new or worse muscle pain while taking a statin and having previously stopped a statin because of muscle symptoms. These data emphasize the importance of enhancing the capabilities of clinicians and health systems for identifying and reducing statin drug interactions.

 
 
 
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