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Articles by E. R Chasens
Total Records ( 4 ) for E. R Chasens
  E. R Chasens , S. M Sereika and L. E. Burke
 

Purpose

This secondary analysis examined the effect of excessive sleepiness on daytime function in older adults with diabetes from the National Sleep Foundation's Sleep and Aging poll.

Methods

Respondents were older adults (N = 1506; age range, 55-84 years) evaluated by telephone survey on their sleep duration, sleep disturbances, daytime functional outcomes, and self-reported height, weight, and comorbidities.

Results

Approximately 16% (n = 244) of the sample acknowledged a diagnosis of diabetes; they were older, had more comorbidities, had a higher body mass index (BMI), and were more likely to be sleepy during the daytime than nondiabetic respondents (all P < .05). Respondents with diabetes who reported frequent daytime sleepiness (n = 50; 20%) had significantly (P < .05) higher BMI, lower self-rated health, and more sleep disturbances than those who were not sleepy (n = 194). Sleepy respondents with diabetes also reported more frequent feelings of depression, decreased pleasure in life, naps, feeling drowsy, or dozing off while driving (all P < .05). Excessive sleepiness was significantly associated (P < .001) with an increased risk for depressive symptoms while controlling for BMI, age, and number of comorbidities.

Conclusions

These results indicate that sleep disturbances affect not only sleep quality but also daytime function in older adults with diabetes.

  K Yang , E. R Chasens , S. M Sereika and L. E. Burke
 

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between cardiovascular risk factors and the presence of diabetes in a large population-level dataset.

Methods

A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a population-based survey (n = 403,137) conducted in the United States.

Results

The majority of the respondents were middle-aged and overweight. Approximately half of the sample reported little or no physical activity. Estimates from a logistic regression model for a weighted sample of white, black, and Hispanic adults revealed that having hypertension or elevated cholesterol was a strong predictor of diabetes even when controlling for age, gender, race, education, income, body mass index, smoking status, and physical activity.

Conclusions

The results confirmed the importance of diabetes educators counseling patients with hypertension or hypercholesterolemia about their increased risk for developing diabetes.

  E. R Chasens , M Enock and M. DiNardo
 

Purpose

Recent research suggests that hearing loss, a frequent problem for aging adults, is more prevalent in people with diabetes. Hearing impairment affects a patient’s learning. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology involved in hearing, describes common causes of hearing loss in people with diabetes, and describes how hearing loss is diagnosed and treated. Two simple tests the diabetes educator can use to screen for hearing loss are described, and interventions that improve communication with patients with difficulty hearing are explained.

Conclusions

Hearing loss can negatively affect a patient’s ability to actively participate in diabetes education. Diabetes educators have a responsibility to learn how to communicate better with their patients who have a hearing impairment. Diabetes educators are uniquely positioned to improve the health status of their patients by identifying persons who need referral for further evaluation of their hearing.

 
 
 
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