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Articles by E. M Dennison
Total Records ( 2 ) for E. M Dennison
  S Robinson , H Syddall , K Jameson , S Batelaan , H Martin , E. M Dennison , C Cooper , A. A Sayer and The Hertfordshire Study Group
 

Background: dietary patterns analysis takes account of the combined effects of foods and may be a more meaningful way of assessing dietary exposure than considering individual nutrients. Little is known about the dietary patterns of older adults in the UK.

Objective: to describe the dietary patterns of a population of community-dwelling older men and women and to examine factors associated with compliance with these patterns.

Setting and Participants: 3,217 men and women aged 59–73 years who were participants in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study.

Methods: diet was assessed using an administered food frequency questionnaire; dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis.

Results: two dietary patterns were identified. The first was characterised by high consumption of fruit, vegetables, oily fish and wholemeal cereals (‘prudent’ pattern); the second was characterised by high consumption of vegetables, processed and red meat, fish and puddings (‘traditional’ pattern). High ‘prudent’ diet scores were more common in women, in men and women in non-manual classes and in non-smokers (all P < 0.05), whilst high ‘traditional’ diet scores were more common in men, in men and women who had partners and were associated with higher alcohol consumption (all P < 0.05).

Conclusions: we have described large variations in food consumption and nutrient intake amongst older adults that are likely to have implications for future health. The specific socio-demographic correlates of the dietary patterns provide insights into the contexts within which good and poor diets exist, and may help in the identification of opportunities for dietary intervention.

  T. A Ashfield , H. E Syddall , H. J Martin , E. M Dennison , C Cooper and A. A. Sayer
 

Background: reduced grip strength is associated with adverse health consequences, and there is interest in identifying modifiable influences. Cardiovascular drugs are commonly used by older people, but their effect on muscle strength is unclear.

Methods: we investigated associations between cardiovascular drug use and grip strength among 1,572 men and 1,415 women, aged 59–73, who participated in the Hertfordshire Cohort Study.

Results: Forty-five percent of participants were taking a cardiovascular drug. Furosemide was associated with average decreases in grip strength of 3.15 kg (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90, 5.39, P < 0.01) among men and 2.35 kg (95% CI 0.93, 3.77, P < 0.01) among women after adjustment for age and height. Corresponding differences for nitrates were 1.84 kg (95% CI 0.29, 3.39, P = 0.02) among men and 3.66 kg (95% CI 1.99, 5.33, P < 0.01) among women. Calcium channel blockers and fibrates were associated with reduced grip among women. Statins were not associated with grip. The associations between grip strength and nitrate use in men and nitrate and fibrate use in women were robust to additional adjustment for co-morbidity.

Conclusions: use of some cardiovascular drugs is associated with reduced grip strength in older people. These findings have potential implications for the functional ability of older people treated with these drugs.

 
 
 
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