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Articles by E. A Platz
Total Records ( 3 ) for E. A Platz
  M. L Neuhouser , C Till , A Kristal , P Goodman , A Hoque , E. A Platz , A. W Hsing , D Albanes , H. L Parnes and M. Pollak
 

Hyperinsulinemia and obesity-related metabolic disturbances are common and have been associated with increased cancer risk and poor prognosis. To investigate this issue in relation to prostate cancer, we conducted a nested case-control study within the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), a randomized, placebo-controlled trial testing finasteride versus placebo for primary prevention of prostate cancer. Cases (n = 1,803) and controls (n = 1,797) were matched on age, PCPT treatment arm, and family history of prostate cancer; controls included all eligible non-whites. Baseline bloods were assayed for serum C-peptide (marker of insulin secretion) and leptin (an adipokine) using ELISA. All outcomes were biopsy determined. Logistic regression calculated odds ratios (OR) for total prostate cancer and polytomous logistic regression calculated ORs for low-grade (Gleason <7) and high-grade (Gleason >7) disease. Results were stratified by PCPT treatment arm for C-peptide. For men on placebo, higher versus lower serum C-peptide was associated with a nearly 2-fold increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason >7; multivariate-adjusted OR, 1.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–2.97; Ptrend = 0.004). When C-peptide was modeled as a continuous variable, every unit increase in log(C-peptide) resulted in a 39% increased risk of high-grade disease (P = 0.01). In contrast, there was no significant relationship between C-peptide and high-grade prostate cancer among men receiving finasteride. Leptin was not independently associated with high-grade prostate cancer. In conclusion, these results support findings from other observational studies that high serum C-peptide and insulin resistance, but not leptin, are associated with increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer. Our novel finding is that the C-peptide–associated risk was attenuated by use of finasteride. Cancer Prev Res; 3(3); 279–89

  H. P Yang , J Gonzalez Bosquet , Q Li , E. A Platz , L. A Brinton , M. E Sherman , J. V Lacey , M. M Gaudet , L. A Burdette , J. D Figueroa , J. G Ciampa , J Lissowska , B Peplonska , S. J Chanock and M. Garcia Closas
 

Background. Estrogen plays a major role in endometrial carcinogenesis, suggesting that common variants of genes in the sex hormone metabolic pathway may be related to endometrial cancer risk. In support of this view, variants in CYP19A1 [cytochrome P450 (CYP), family 19, subfamily A, polypeptide 1] have been associated with both circulating estrogen levels and endometrial cancer risk. Associations with variants in other genes have been suggested, but findings have been inconsistent. Methods. We examined 36 sex hormone-related genes using a tagging approach in a population-based case–control study of 417 endometrial cancer cases and 407 controls conducted in Poland. We evaluated common variation in these genes in relation to endometrial cancer risk using sequential haplotype scan, variable-sized sliding window and adaptive rank-truncated product (ARTP) methods. Results. In our case–control study, the strongest association with endometrial cancer risk was for AR (androgen receptor; ARTP P = 0.006). Multilocus analyses also identified boundaries for a region of interest in AR and in CYP19A1 around a previously identified susceptibility loci. We did not find evidence for consistent associations between previously reported candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms in this pathway and endometrial cancer risk. Discussion. In summary, we identified regions in AR and CYP19A1 that are of interest for further evaluation in relation to endometrial cancer risk in future haplotype and subsequent fine mapping studies in larger study populations.

  J. R Stark , G Judson , J. F Alderete , V Mundodi , A. S Kucknoor , E. L Giovannucci , E. A Platz , S Sutcliffe , K Fall , T Kurth , J Ma , M. J Stampfer and L. A. Mucci
  Background

A recent nested case–control study found that the presence of antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis, a common nonviral sexually transmitted infection, was positively associated with subsequent incidence of prostate cancer. We confirmed these findings in an independent population and related serostatus for antibodies against T vaginalis to prostate cancer incidence and mortality.

Methods

We conducted a case–control study nested within the Physicians’ Health Study that included 673 case subjects with prostate cancer and 673 individually matched control subjects who had available plasma samples. Plasma from blood samples collected at baseline was assayed for antibodies against T vaginalis with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) of incident prostate cancer, extraprostatic prostate cancer, and cancer that would ultimately progress to bony metastases or prostate cancer–specific death.

Results

Although not statistically significant, the magnitude of the association between T vaginalis–seropositive status and overall prostate cancer risk (OR = 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.94 to 1.61) was similar to that reported previously. Furthermore, a seropositive status was associated with statistically significantly increased risks of extraprostatic prostate cancer (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.08 to 4.37) and of cancer that would ultimately progress to bony metastases or prostate cancer–specific death (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.37 to 5.28).

Conclusions

This large prospective case–control study obtained further support for an association between a seropositive status for antibodies against T vaginalis and the risk of prostate cancer, with statistically significant associations identified for the risk of extraprostatic prostate cancer and for clinically relevant, potentially lethal prostate cancer.

 
 
 
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