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Articles by Danielle J. Harvey
Total Records ( 3 ) for Danielle J. Harvey
  Gloria C. Chiang , Philip S. Insel , Duygu Tosun , Norbert Schuff , Diana Truran- Sacrey , Sky T. Raptentsetsang , Paul M. Thompson , Eric M. Reiman , Clifford R. Jack , Nick C. Fox , William J. Jagust , Danielle J. Harvey , Laurel A. Beckett , Anthony Gamst , Paul S. Aisen , Ron C. Petersen and Michael W. Weiner
  Background The majority of studies relating amyloid pathology with brain volumes have been cross-sectional. Apolipoprotein ɛ4 (APOE ɛ4), a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer‘s disease, is also known to be associated with hippocampal volume loss. No studies have considered the effects of amyloid pathology and APOE ɛ4 together on longitudinal volume loss. Methods We evaluated whether an abnormal level of cerebrospinal fluid beta-amyloid (CSF Aβ) and APOE ɛ4 carrier status were independently associated with greater hippocampal volume loss over 1 year. We then assessed whether APOE ɛ4 status and CSF Aβ acted synergistically, testing the significance of an interaction term in the regression analysis. We included 297 participants: 77 cognitively normal, 144 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 76 with Alzheimer‘s disease. Results An abnormal CSF Aβ level was found to be associated with greater hippocampal volume loss over 1 year in each group. APOE ɛ4 was associated with hippocampal volume loss only in the cognitively normal and MCI groups. APOE ɛ4 carriers with abnormal CSF Aβ in the MCI group acted synergistically to produce disproportionately greater volume loss than noncarriers. Conclusion Baseline CSF Aβ predicts progression of hippocampal volume loss. APOE ɛ4 carrier status amplifies the degree of neurodegeneration in MCI. Understanding the effect of interactions between genetic risk and amyloid pathology will be important in clinical trials and our understanding of the disease process.
  Sarah Tomaszewski Farias , Dan Mungas , Danielle J. Harvey , Amanda Simmons , Bruce R. Reed and Charles DeCarli
  Background This study describes the development and validation of a shortened version of the Everyday Cognition (ECog) scales [Tomaszewski Farias et al. Neuropsychology 2008;22:531–44], an informant-rated questionnaire designed to detect cognitive and functional decline. Methods External, convergent, and divergent validities and internal consistency were examined. Data were derived from informant ratings of 907 participants who were either cognitively normal, had mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or had dementia. Results Twelve items were included in the shortened version (ECog-12). The ECog-12 strongly correlated with established functional measures and neuropsychological scores, only weakly with age and education, and demonstrated high internal consistency. The ECog-12 showed excellent discrimination between the dementia and normal groups (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve = 0.95, CI = 0.94–0.97), and showed promise in discriminating normal older adults from those with any cognitive impairment (i.e., MCI or dementia). Discrimination between the MCI and normal groups was poor. Conclusions The ECog-12 shows promise as a clinical tool for assisting clinicians in identifying individuals with dementia.
  Bradley T. Wyman , Danielle J. Harvey , Karen Crawford , Matt A. Bernstein , Owen Carmichael , Patricia E. Cole , Paul K. Crane , Charles DeCarli , Nick C. Fox , Jeffrey L. Gunter , Derek Hill , Ronald J. Killiany , Chahin Pachai , Adam J. Schwarz , Norbert Schuff , Matthew L. Senjem , Joyce Suhy , Paul M. Thompson , Paul M. Thompson and Clifford R. Jack
  The Alzheimer‘s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions provide a rich data set for developing and testing analysis techniques for extracting structural endpoints. To promote greater rigor in analysis and meaningful comparison of different algorithms, the ADNI MRI Core has created standardized analysis sets of data comprising scans that met minimum quality control requirements. We encourage researchers to test and report their techniques against these data. Standard analysis sets of volumetric scans from ADNI-1 have been created, comprising screening visits, 1-year completers (subjects who all have screening, 6- and 12-month scans), 2-year annual completers (screening, 1-year and 2-year scans), 2-year completers (screening, 6-months, 1-year, 18-months [mild cognitive impaired (MCI) only], and 2-year scans), and complete visits (screening, 6-month, 1-year, 18-month [MCI only], 2-year, and 3-year [normal and MCI only] scans). As the ADNI-GO/ADNI-2 data become available, updated standard analysis sets will be posted regularly.
 
 
 
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