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Articles by D. T Ko
Total Records ( 3 ) for D. T Ko
  D. T Ko , L Yun , H. C Wijeysundera , C. A Jackevicius , S. V Rao , P. C Austin , J. F Marquis and J. V. Tu
 

Background— Previous data on bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been obtained primarily from randomized trials that focused on in-hospital bleeding. The incidence of late bleeding after PCI, its independent predictors, and its prognostic importance in clinical practice has not been fully addressed.

Methods and Results— We evaluated 22 798 patients aged >65 years who underwent PCI from December 1, 2003, to March 31, 2007, in Ontario, Canada. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine factors associated with late bleeding, which was defined as hospitalization for bleeding after discharge from the index PCI, and to estimate risk of death or myocardial infarction associated with late bleeding. We found that 2.5% of patients were hospitalized for bleeding in the year after PCI, with 56% of bleeding episodes due to gastrointestinal bleed. The most significant predictor of late bleeding was warfarin use after PCI (hazard ratio [HR], 3.12). Other significant predictors included age (HR, 1.41 per 10 years), male sex (HR, 1.24), cancer (HR, 1.80), previous bleeding (HR, 2.42), chronic kidney disease (HR, 1.93), and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use (HR, 1.73). After adjusting for baseline covariates, hospitalization for a bleeding episode was associated with a significantly increased 1-year hazard of death or myocardial infarction (HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.93 to 2.97) and death (HR, 3.38; 95% CI, 2.60 to 4.40).

Conclusions— Hospitalization for late bleeding after PCI is associated with substantially increased risk of death and myocardial infarction. The use of triple therapy (ie, aspirin, thienopyridine, and warfarin) is associated with the highest risk of late bleeding.

  D. T Ko , J. S Ross , Y Wang and H. M. Krumholz
 

Background— Cardiac catheterization is substantially underused among higher-risk patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with appropriate indications but overused among patients with inappropriate indications. We sought to determine the importance of anticipated benefit and anticipated harm on the use of cardiac catheterization among older patients with AMI.

Methods and Results— We performed an analysis of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized with an AMI between 1998 and 2001. Multivariate models were developed to determine relative importance of anticipated benefit (baseline cardiovascular risk), anticipated harm (bleeding risk, comorbidities), and demographic factors (age, sex, race, regional invasive intensity) in predicting cardiac catheterization use within 60 days of AMI admission. Analyses were stratified by American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association class I or II as appropriate, and class III as inappropriate. Determinants of reduced likelihood of cardiac catheterization among 42 241 AMI patients with appropriate indications included (in order of importance) older age (likelihood 2=1309.5), higher bleeding risk score (likelihood 2=471.2), more comorbidities (likelihood 2=276.6), female sex (likelihood 2=162.9), hospitalization in low (likelihood 2=67.9) or intermediate intensity invasive regions (likelihood 2=22.4) (all P<0.001), and baseline cardiovascular risk (likelihood 2=6.4, P=0.01). Among 2398 AMI patients with inappropriate indications, significant determinants of greater procedure likelihood included younger age, male sex, lower bleeding risk score, and fewer comorbidities.

Conclusions— Regardless of the procedure indication, the decision to perform cardiac catheterization in this population appears largely driven by demographic factors and potential harm rather than potential benefit of the procedure.

  P. A Kavsak , X Wang , D. T Ko , A. R MacRae and A. S. Jaffe
 

Background: The next-generation, high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays can measure quantifiable concentrations of cTn in a majority of individuals, but there are few studies assessing these assays for risk stratification. The present study was undertaken to determine if a research hs-cTnI assay can be useful for predicting death/myocardial infarction (MI), both short- and long-term, in an emergency department acute coronary syndrome (ACS) population.

Methods: In a cohort of 383 subjects, originally recruited in 1996, presenting to the emergency department with symptoms suggestive of ACS, the heparin plasma obtained at initial presentation was thawed and measured in 2007 with a research hs-cTnI assay. AccuTnI (Beckman Coulter) measurements were made on these same samples in 2003. The population was divided into 4 groups by hs-cTnI: <5.00, 5.00–9.99, 10.00–40.00, and >40.00 ng/L. Kaplan–Meier, Cox proportional hazards, ROC curves, and logistic regression analyses were used to identify which hs-cTnI concentrations were predictive of death/MI within 10 years after presentation.

Results: There were significant differences between the hs-cTnI groups for the probability of death/MI up to 10 years after presentation (P < 0.05). At 6 months, patients with hs-cTnI ≥10.00 ng/L were at higher risk for death/MI (hazard ratio >3.7; P < 0.05) compared with those having hs-cTnI <5.00 ng/L. ROC curve analysis for death/MI at 30 days with the hs-cTnI assay had an area under the curve of 0.74 (95% CI 0.65–0.82), with logistic models yielding an optimal assay threshold of 12.68 ng/L.

Conclusions: This research hs-cTnI assay appears useful for risk stratification for death/MI in an ACS population.

 
 
 
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