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Articles by D. O Stram
Total Records ( 4 ) for D. O Stram
  I Cheng , D. O Stram , N. P Burtt , L Gianniny , R. R Garcia , L Pooler , B. E Henderson , L Le Marchand and C. A. Haiman
 

IGF2R has been proposed to be a tumor suppressor gene given its antagonist role on cellular growth and evidence of loss of heterozygosity in several cancers, including breast cancer. To investigate whether inherited differences in potentially functional IGF2R variants influence the risk of breast cancer, we sequenced 46 exons of IGF2R to identify novel missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and tested 12 missense SNPs for their associations with breast cancer risk among 1,614 breast cancer cases and 1,960 controls from the Multiethnic Cohort. None of these missense SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer risk. Our findings provide no evidence that missense SNPs in IGF2R influence breast cancer susceptibility.(Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(6):1922–4)

  J. A Zell , A Ziogas , L Bernstein , C. A Clarke , D Deapen , J. A Largent , S. L Neuhausen , D. O Stram , G Ursin and H. Anton Culver
 

A low-meat diet and regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) have been associated with decreased mortality among colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Here, we investigated the association between prediagnosis usual meat consumption and CRC-specific mortality, and whether meat consumption modifies the previously noted association between NSAID use and CRC-specific mortality among women in the California Teachers Study cohort. Women joining the California Teachers Study in 1995-1996 without prior CRC diagnosis, diagnosed with incident CRC during follow-up through December 2007, were eligible for inclusion. Meat intake (frequency and serving size) and NSAID use (aspirin or ibuprofen use) were ascertained via self-administered questionnaires before diagnosis. Vital status and cause of death were determined by linkage with mortality files. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for death and 95% confidence intervals. Prediagnosis meat consumption was not associated with CRC-specific mortality among 704 CRC patients (and 201 CRC-specific deaths), comparing patients in the lowest consumption tertile (0-5.4 medium-sized servings/wk) to those in the higher consumption tertiles. Regular NSAID use (1-3 times/wk, 4-6 times/wk, daily) versus none was associated with decreased CRC-specific mortality among patients in the lowest meat consumption tertile (hazard ratio, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.06-0.82), but not among patients in the higher meat intake tertiles. The previously observed mortality risk reduction among female CRC patients associated with regular NSAID use was restricted to patients who reported low meat intake before diagnosis. These findings have implications for CRC survivorship and tertiary CRC prevention. Cancer Prev Res; 3(7); 865–75. ©2010 AACR.

  L Dossus , R Kaaks , F Canzian , D Albanes , S. I Berndt , H Boeing , J Buring , S. J Chanock , F Clavel Chapelon , H. S Feigelson , J. M Gaziano , E Giovannucci , C Gonzalez , C. A Haiman , G Hallmans , S. E Hankinson , R. B Hayes , B. E Henderson , R. N Hoover , D. J Hunter , K. T Khaw , L. N Kolonel , P Kraft , J Ma , L Le Marchand , E Lund , P. H.M Peeters , M Stampfer , D. O Stram , G Thomas , M. J Thun , A Tjonneland , D Trichopoulos , R Tumino , E Riboli , J Virtamo , S. J Weinstein , M Yeager , R. G Ziegler and D. G. Cox
 

Genes involved in the inflammation pathway have been associated with cancer risk. Genetic variants in the interleukin-6 (IL6) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS2, encoding for the COX-2 enzyme) genes, in particular, have been related to several cancer types, including breast and prostate cancers. We conducted a study within the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium to examine the association between IL6 and PTGS2 polymorphisms and breast and prostate cancer risk. Twenty-seven polymorphisms, selected by pairwise tagging, were genotyped on 6292 breast cancer cases and 8135 matched controls and 8008 prostate cancer cases and 8604 matched controls. The large sample sizes and comprehensive single nucleotide polymorphism tagging in this study gave us excellent power to detect modest effects for common variants. After adjustment for multiple testing, none of the associations examined remained statistically significant at P = 0.01. In analyses not adjusted for multiple testing, one IL6 polymorphism (rs6949149) was marginally associated with breast cancer risk (TT versus GG, odds ratios (OR): 1.32; 99% confidence intervals (CI): 1.00–1.74, Ptrend = 0.003) and two were marginally associated with prostate cancer risk (rs6969502-AA versus rs6969502-GG, OR: 0.87, 99% CI: 0.75–1.02; Ptrend = 0.002 and rs7805828-AA versus rs7805828-GG, OR: 1.11, 99% CI: 0.99–1.26; Ptrend = 0.007). An increase in breast cancer risk was observed for the PTGS2 polymorphism rs7550380 (TT versus GG, OR: 1.38, 99% CI: 1.04–1.83). No association was observed between PTGS2 polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk. In conclusion, common genetic variation in these two genes might play at best a limited role in breast and prostate cancers.

  H Song , S. J Ramus , S. K Kjaer , R. A DiCioccio , G Chenevix Trench , C. L Pearce , E Hogdall , A. S Whittemore , V McGuire , C Hogdall , J Blaakaer , A. H Wu , D. J Van Den Berg , D. O Stram , U Menon , A Gentry Maharaj , I. J Jacobs , P. M Webb , J Beesley , X Chen , The Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group the Australian Cancer (Ovarian) Study , J. A Doherty , J Chang Claude , S Wang Gohrke , M. T Goodman , G Lurie , P. J Thompson , M. E Carney , R. B Ness , K Moysich , E. L Goode , R. A Vierkant , J. M Cunningham , S Anderson , J. M Schildkraut , A Berchuck , E. S Iversen , P. G Moorman , M Garcia Closas , S Chanock , J Lissowska , L Brinton , H Anton Culver , A Ziogas , W. R Brewster , B. A.J Ponder , D. F Easton , S. A Gayther , P. D.P Pharoah and on behalf of the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC)
 

Because both ovarian and breast cancer are hormone-related and are known to have some predisposition genes in common, we evaluated 11 of the most significant hits (six with confirmed associations with breast cancer) from the breast cancer genome-wide association study for association with invasive ovarian cancer. Eleven SNPs were initially genotyped in 2927 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 4143 controls from six ovarian cancer case–control studies. Genotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared using a likelihood ratio test in a logistic regression model stratified by study. Initially, three SNPs (rs2107425 in MRPL23, rs7313833 in PTHLH, rs3803662 in TNRC9) were weakly associated with ovarian cancer risk and one SNP (rs4954956 in NXPH2) was associated with serous ovarian cancer in non-Hispanic white subjects (P-trend < 0.1). These four SNPs were then genotyped in an additional 4060 cases and 6308 controls from eight independent studies. Only rs4954956 was significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk both in the replication study and in combined analyses. This association was stronger for the serous histological subtype [per minor allele odds ratio (OR) 1.07 95% CI 1.01–1.13, P-trend = 0.02 for all types of ovarian cancer and OR 1.14 95% CI 1.07–1.22, P-trend = 0.00017 for serous ovarian cancer]. In conclusion, we found that rs4954956 was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, particularly for serous ovarian cancer. However, none of the six confirmed breast cancer susceptibility variants we tested was associated with ovarian cancer risk. Further work will be needed to identify the causal variant associated with rs4954956 or elucidate its function.

 
 
 
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