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Articles by D Yin
Total Records ( 2 ) for D Yin
  A Qian , S Di , X Gao , W Zhang , Z Tian , J Li , L Hu , P Yang , D Yin and P. Shang
 

The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has been widely applied in many fields. In this study, a special designed superconducting magnet, which can produce three apparent gravity levels (0, 1, and 2 g), namely high magneto-gravitational environment (HMGE), was used to simulate space gravity environment. The effects of HMGE on osteoblast gene expression profile were investigated by microarray. Genes sensitive to diamagnetic levitation environment (0 g), gravity changes, and high magnetic field changes were sorted on the basis of typical cell functions. Cytoskeleton, as an intracellular load-bearing structure, plays an important role in gravity perception. Therefore, 13 cytoskeleton-related genes were chosen according to the results of microarray analysis, and the expressions of these genes were found to be altered under HMGE by real-time PCR. Based on the PCR results, the expressions of WASF2 (WAS protein family, member 2), WIPF1 (WAS/WASL interacting protein family, member 1), paxillin, and talin 1 were further identified by western blot assay. Results indicated that WASF2 and WIPF1 were more sensitive to altered gravity levels, and talin 1 and paxillin were sensitive to both magnetic field and gravity changes. Our findings demonstrated that HMGE can affect osteoblast gene expression profile and cytoskeleton-related genes expression. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understandings to the mechanism of bone loss induced by microgravity and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  L Santhanam , E. C Tuday , A. K Webb , P Dowzicky , J. H Kim , Y. J Oh , G Sikka , M Kuo , M. K Halushka , A. M Macgregor , J Dunn , S Gutbrod , D Yin , A Shoukas , D Nyhan , N. A Flavahan , A. M Belkin and D. E. Berkowitz
 

Rationale: Although an age-related decrease in NO bioavailability contributes to vascular stiffness, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We hypothesize that NO constrains the activity of the matrix crosslinking enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) via S-nitrosylation in young vessels, a process that is reversed in aging.

Objective: We sought to determine whether endothelium-dependent NO regulates TG2 activity by S-nitrosylation and whether this contributes to age-related vascular stiffness.

Methods and Results: We first demonstrate that NO suppresses activity and increases S-nitrosylation of TG2 in cellular models. Next, we show that nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition leads to increased surface and extracellular matrix–associated TG2. We then demonstrate that endothelium-derived bioactive NO primarily mediates its effects through TG2, using TG2–/– mice chronically treated with the NOS inhibitor l-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). We confirm that TG2 activity is modulated by endothelium-derived bioactive NO in young rat aorta. In aging rat aorta, although TG2 expression remains unaltered, its activity increases and S-nitrosylation decreases. Furthermore, TG2 inhibition decreases vascular stiffness in aging rats. Finally, TG2 activity and matrix crosslinks are augmented with age in human aorta, whereas abundance remains unchanged.

Conclusions: Decreased S-nitrosylation of TG2 and increased TG activity lead to enhanced matrix crosslinking and contribute to vascular stiffening in aging. TG2 appears to be the member of the transglutaminase family primarily contributing to this phenotype. Inhibition of TG2 could thus represent a therapeutic target for age-associated vascular stiffness and isolated systolic hypertension.

 
 
 
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