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Articles by D Cui
Total Records ( 3 ) for D Cui
  W Sun , X Gao , X Zhao , D Cui and Q. Xia
 

The study was undertaken to examine the effects of C-peptide on glomerular volume (VGLOM), mesangial matrix synthesis, and degradation in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats with poor or moderate glycemic control. Series 1 (poor glycemic control) included groups of healthy rats, hyperglycemic rats, diabetic insulin-treated rats and diabetic C-peptide-treated rats. Series 2 (moderate glycemic control) included groups of healthy rats, diabetic insulin-treated rats, diabetic insulin- and C-peptide-treated rats. After 8 weeks, the left kidney was excised for evaluation of VGLOM and mesangial matrix area via light microscopy. Mesangial cells were cultured for 48 h and type IV collagen expression and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression were measured by ELISA and RT–PCR. The results indicated that in Series 1, C-peptide administration suppressed the diabetes-induced increase in the VGLOM and the mesangial matrix area. In Series 2, C-peptide administration resulted in a similar decrease in the VGLOM and a greater decrease in the mesangial matrix area when compared with insulin therapy alone. Moreover, C-peptide (300 nM) completely inhibited the glucose-induced increase of the collagen IV mRNA expression and protein concentration in mesangial cells cultured in 30 mM glucose medium. MMP-2 mRNA expression was not influenced by C-peptide. In conclusion, C-peptide administration to STZ-diabetic rats for 8 weeks results in the inhibition of diabetes-induced expansion of the mesangial matrix. This effect is independent of the level of glycemic control and results from the inhibition of diabetes-induced excessive formation of mesangial type IV collagen.

  D Cui and M. E. Morris
 

-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), a drug of abuse, is a substrate of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1 (SMCT1; SLC5A8) is expressed in kidney, thyroid gland, neurons, and intestinal tract and exhibits substrate specificity similar to that of the proton-dependent MCT (SLC16A) family. The role of SMCT1 in GHB disposition has not been determined. In this study we characterized the driving force, transport kinetics, and inhibitors of GHB uptake, as well as expression of SMCT and MCT isoforms, in rat thyroid follicular (FRTL-5) cells. GHB, as well as the monocarboxylates butyrate and d-lactate, exhibited sodium-dependent uptake at pH 7.4, which could be described with a simple Michaelis-Menten equation plus a diffusional component [Km 0.68 ± 0.30 mM, Vmax 3.50 ± 1.58 nmol · mg–1 · min–1, and diffusional clearance (P) 0.25 ± 0.08 µl · mg–1 · min–1]. In the absence of sodium, GHB uptake was significantly increased at lower pH, suggesting proton-gradient dependent transport. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western analyses demonstrated the expression of SMCT1, MCT1, and MCT2 in FRTL-5 cells, supporting the activity results. Sodium-dependent GHB uptake in FRTL-5 cells was inhibited by MCT substrates (d-lactate, l-lactate, pyruvate, and butyrate), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen), and probenecid. IC50 values for l-lactate, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and probenecid were 101, 31.6, 64.4, and 380 µM, respectively. All four inhibitors also significantly inhibited GHB uptake in rat MCT1 gene-transfected MDA/MB231 cells, suggesting they are not specific for SMCT1. Luteolin and -cyano-4-hydroxycinnimate represent specific proton-dependent MCT inhibitors. Our findings indicate that GHB is a substrate for both sodium- and proton-dependent MCTs and identified specific inhibitors of MCTs.

  D Cui and M. E. Morris
 

-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), a drug of abuse, is a substrate of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1 (SMCT1; SLC5A8) is expressed in kidney, thyroid gland, neurons, and intestinal tract and exhibits substrate specificity similar to that of the proton-dependent MCT (SLC16A) family. The role of SMCT1 in GHB disposition has not been determined. In this study we characterized the driving force, transport kinetics, and inhibitors of GHB uptake, as well as expression of SMCT and MCT isoforms, in rat thyroid follicular (FRTL-5) cells. GHB, as well as the monocarboxylates butyrate and d-lactate, exhibited sodium-dependent uptake at pH 7.4, which could be described with a simple Michaelis-Menten equation plus a diffusional component [Km 0.68 ± 0.30 mM, Vmax 3.50 ± 1.58 nmol · mg–1 · min–1, and diffusional clearance (P) 0.25 ± 0.08 µl · mg–1 · min–1]. In the absence of sodium, GHB uptake was significantly increased at lower pH, suggesting proton-gradient dependent transport. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western analyses demonstrated the expression of SMCT1, MCT1, and MCT2 in FRTL-5 cells, supporting the activity results. Sodium-dependent GHB uptake in FRTL-5 cells was inhibited by MCT substrates (d-lactate, l-lactate, pyruvate, and butyrate), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen), and probenecid. IC50 values for l-lactate, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and probenecid were 101, 31.6, 64.4, and 380 µM, respectively. All four inhibitors also significantly inhibited GHB uptake in rat MCT1 gene-transfected MDA/MB231 cells, suggesting they are not specific for SMCT1. Luteolin and -cyano-4-hydroxycinnimate represent specific proton-dependent MCT inhibitors. Our findings indicate that GHB is a substrate for both sodium- and proton-dependent MCTs and identified specific inhibitors of MCTs.

 
 
 
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