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Articles by Chalermpon Yuangklang
Total Records ( 4 ) for Chalermpon Yuangklang
  Sasiphan Wongsuthavas , Chalermpon Yuangklang , Suntorn Wittayakun , Kraisit Vasupen , Jamlong Mitchaothai , Paiwan Srenanual and Anton C. Beynen
  In broiler chickens we tested the hypothesis that dietary fats rich in medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCT) would diminish abdominal fat deposition as do fats rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Broiler chickens were fed on diets containing either tallow, which is rich in Saturated Fatty Acids (SFA), soybean oil, which is rich in PUFA, or krabok oil, which is rich in MCT. Krabok oil was isolated from the seeds of a tree (Irvingia malayana) grown widely in tropical and subtropical areas. Growth performance was not significantly affected by the type of dietary fat. Possibly, the production of krabok oil for use in broiler rations may become economically relevant. The diets containing either soybean oil or krabok oil showed a significantly higher apparent fat digestibility than did the diet containing tallow. In keeping with earlier investigations, dietary soybean oil versus tallow significantly lowered abdominal fat deposition, the lowering being 21%. The feeding of krabok oil instead of tallow did not affect the weight of abdominal fat, which would lead to rejection of our hypothesis.
  Sasiphan Wongsuthavas , Chalermpon Yuangklang , Kraisit Vasupen , Jamlong Mitchaothai , Paiwan Srenanual and Anton C. Beynen
  Replacement of dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA) by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has been consistently shown to reduce the amount of abdominal fat in broiler chickens, but the metabolic basis for this effect is unknown. It was hypothesized that the feeding of PUFA instead of SFA would induce more heat expenditure, this effect being associated with less deposition of abdominal fat. Broiler chickens were given one of five diets in which the beef tallow component, which is rich in SFA, was replaced by increasing amounts of soybean oil, which is rich in PUFA. The variable fat content of the diets was 3% (w/w). There were neither significant nor systematic effects on weight gain and feed:gain ratio. The amount of body fat was reduced significantly (p<0.05) when about 75% of the tallow was replaced by soybean oil, but there was no further decrease after the incorporation of more soybean oil into the diet. Calculated energy expenditure, either expressed as absolute amount or percentage of intake, trended to enhance but was not significantly affected by the amount of soybean oil in the diet.
  Sasiphan Wongsuthavas , Chalermpon Yuangklang , Kraisit Vasupen , Jamlong Mitchaothai , Paiwan Srenanual , Suntorn Wittayakun and Anton C. Beynen
  Replacement of dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA) by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) has been consistently shown to reduce the amount of abdominal fat in broiler chickens, but the metabolic basis for this effect is unknown. It was hypothesized that the feeding of PUFA instead of SFA would inhibit whole-body de novo fatty acid synthesis. As indexes of de novo fatty acid synthesis, we used the concentration of plasma triacylglycerols and minimum fatty acid synthesis calculated as fatty deposition minus digestible fatty acid intake. Broiler chickens were given one of five diets in which the beef tallow component, which is rich in SFA, was replaced by increasing amounts of soybean oil, which is rich in PUFA. The variable fat content of the diets was 3% (w/w). There were neither significant nor systematic effects on weight gain and feed:gain ratio. The amount of abdominal fat was reduced significantly when about 75% of the tallow was replaced by soybean oil, but there was no further decrease after the incorporation of more soybean oil into the diet. The decrease in abdominal fat was associated with a decrease in the level of plasma triacylglycerols, but it was not associated with minimum de novo fatty acid synthesis in the whole body.
  Pattaya Napasirth , Chalong Wachirapakorn , Pathcharee Saenjan and Chalermpon Yuangklang
  The present study demonstrated the effect of levels of sulfate-containing compounds on methane production using in vitro gas production technique. Treatments were TMR without supplement (control) and TMR with 0.2 or 0.4% of ammonium sulfate, copper sulfate and sodium lauryl sulfate in a 3x2 Factorial in CRD with one control. Rumen fluid was collected from two rumen-fistulated beef cattle fed on a based diet. During the incubation, the gas production was recorded at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 and 96 h. The results revealed that increased the levels of sulfate-containing compounds in the TMR diet decreased the gas accumulation and CH4 accumulation all the time. Although, the sum of the MRP did not differ among treatments, the MRP at 24 h after incubation was greatly appreciated by 0.2% of ammonium sulfate (14.53%). In addition, ammonium sulfate led to the highest IVOMD followed by the copper sulfate. Therefore, this study suggested that ammonium sulfate and copper sulfate and sodium lauryl sulfate at 0.2 and 0.4% in the TMR diet have the potential to reduce methane emission.
 
 
 
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