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Articles by C. Opoku-Okrah
Total Records ( 2 ) for C. Opoku-Okrah
  W. K.B.A. Owiredu , M. S. Adamu , N. Amidu , E. Woode , V. Bam , J. Planger-Rhule and C. Opoku-Okrah
  The purpose of this study was to examine the risk associations between indices of obesity [Body Mass Index (BMI), Waist Circumference (WC), Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR) and Waist-to-Height Ratio (WHtR)], cardiovascular risk factors [plasma glucose and cholesterol and blood pressure] and morbidity conditions (Type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia) among Penteco-Charismatic Ghanaians. Three hundred and eighty three Penteco-Charismatic Ghanaian subjects (18-85 years of age) were recruited from Pentecost Church, Santasi (101), Assembly of God Bantama (192) and, Assembly of God, Old Tafo (90) in Kumasi, Ghana. The mean BMI were 25.72±5.97 kg m-2, 22.61±3.48 and 27.10±6.33 kg m-2 for the study population, male and female subjects, respectively. The mean WC measurement for the subjects was 90.21±12.29 cm and 85.91±8.77 and 92.10±13.13 cm in male and females, respectively. There were increasing trends between indices of obesity and the severity of cardiovascular risk factors and the prevalence of morbidity conditions (all p-values for trend <0.05). Patients with a greater number of comorbidities also had higher BMI, WC, WHR and WHtR measurements (all p-values for the trend were <0.05 with adjustment for age and gender). Despite Penteco-Charismatic Ghanaian subjects being less obese than subjects from Caucasians countries, the intimate relationships among obesity, cardiovascular risk factors and morbidity conditions remain. This study support using lower BMI and WC levels to define obesity and its associated health risks rather than using the criteria established for Caucasians who generally have larger body frames. Obesity is becoming increasingly common among Ghanaian adults. There is, therefore, the need for broad-based programs that facilitate healthy eating and activity patterns for all age groups. Health professionals should incorporate measurement of BMI and WHR into the routine examinations of patients to enhance their evaluation of the health status of their patients.
  C. Ansah , E.A. Mfoafo , E. Woode , C. Opoku-Okrah and W.K.B.A. Owiredu
  In this study, we evaluated the aqueous extract of the roots of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta (Periplocaceae), an anti-malarial herb in the West African sub-region for possible toxicity in rodents. Administration of cryptolepis (10-1000 mg kg-1) daily for two weeks did not cause significant changes in most of the haematological parameters assessed. However, the MCV reduced from a vehicle-treated value of 63.1 ± 0.6 to 58.1 ± 0.9 g dL-1 at a dose of 10 mg kg-1, which reflected in an increased MCHC (27.8 ± 0.3 to 30.5 ± 0.3 g dL-1), since the Hb concentration remained unchanged. Serum transaminase levels did not change significantly suggesting a limited effect on the liver. Administration of the extract (50-1000 mg kg-1, p.o.) 30 min before pentobarbitone (50 mg kg-1, i.p.) caused a dose-dependent prolongation of the rat sleeping time from 66.6 ± 8.1 min (vehicle-treated control) to 266.5 ± 7.0 min (1000 mg kg-1). Similarly, daily treatment with the extract (50-1000 mg kg-1) for 2 weeks prolonged the sleeping time from 155 ± 28.4 to 292.8 ± 28.7 min. This effect appeared to be CNS-related rather than an enzymatic as reflected in a decreased locomotor activity (19.4 ± 1.5 to 1.8 ± 0.8 min-1) at a dose of 500 mg kg-1 body weight. All together, our results suggest that Cryptolepis could synergize with hypno-sedatives or other CNS depressants and therefore caution needs to be taken in the concomitant administration of Cryptolepis and other CNS depressants.
 
 
 
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