Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by C. Cooper
Total Records ( 2 ) for C. Cooper
  R. I. G. Holt , D. I. W. Phillips , K. A. Jameson , C. Cooper , E. M. Dennison and R. C. Peveler
  Aims To assess the relationship between depression scores and diabetes, glucose and insulin in a cross-sectional population-based study.

Methods One thousand, five hundred and seventy-nine men and 1418 women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study were assessed for diabetes. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at 0, 30 and 120 min during a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).

Results Overall, 431 (14.6%) were diagnosed with diabetes [232 men (14.9%) and 199 women (14.3%)]. One hundred and eight (47%) men and 74 (37%) women had known diabetes. The remainder were previously undiagnosed. Fifty-nine (3.7%) men and 65 (4.6%) women had possible depression (HAD-D scores 8–10) and 17 (1.1%) men and 20 (1.4%) women had probable depression (HAD-D scores ≥ 11). Probable depression was associated with an adjusted odds ratio for diabetes of 3.89 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28–11.88] in men and 1.51 (95% CI 0.47–4.84) in women. In men without previously diagnosed diabetes, fasting insulin (P = 0.035), 2-h glucose concentrations (P = 0.028) and insulin resistance (P = 0.032) were significantly associated with HAD-D scores. With the exception of 2-h glucose concentrations (P = 0.034), the associations were not significant in women.

Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that depression may increase the risk for diabetes. The relationship between depression score and metabolic variables extends across the whole population and is not confined to those with either diagnosed depression or diabetes. This relationship should lead clinicians to consider screening for diabetes in those with depression and vice versa.

  S. Sun , R. Puttha , S. Ghezaiel , M. Skae , C. Cooper and R. Amin
  Objective: To determine the effect of coeliac disease and treatment with a gluten-free diet on growth and glycaemic control in asymptomatic children with Type 1 diabetes.
Methods: Data were compared in children with coeliac disease diagnosed by annual antibody screening and jejunal biopsy and treated with a gluten-free diet (n = 49) against individuals who were antibody negative (n = 49) matched for age, sex and duration of diabetes.
Results: No differences in growth were observed. In the years prior to diagnosis of coeliac disease, mean glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was lower in cases compared with control subjects [8.3 ± 1.1% vs. 8.7 ± 0.9%, P = 0.02 (mean ± sd)]. In cases, HbA1c deteriorated 12 months from the start of a gluten-free diet to levels similar to control subjects (8.9 ± 1.5% vs. 8.8 ± 1.5%, P-value for analysis of variance = 0.9). In regression analysis, the diagnosis of coeliac disease and start of a gluten-free diet was associated with a rise in HbA1c in the first year of treatment [odds ratio 1.56 (95% confidence intervals 1.16–2.10), P = 0.003] after adjusting for insulin dose and regimen and other variables.
Conclusions: In children with Type 1 diabetes, lower HbA1c prior to diagnosis of silent coeliac disease rises following treatment with a gluten-free diet to levels similar to those without coeliac disease. Although unproven, these observations may relate to abnormalities at the small bowel mucosa before the appearance of circulating coeliac antibodies.
 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility