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Articles by C. Q Jiang
Total Records ( 2 ) for C. Q Jiang
  Q. Y Liao , W. W. T Lam , V. T Dang , C. Q Jiang , V Udomprasertgul and R. Fielding
  Background

Health education to reduce population poultry exposures has limited effect. Lay beliefs about H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) causes could provide insights helpful for improving public health interventions.

Methods

Qualitative interviews of poultry farmers, retailers, market stall holders and consumers in Hong Kong (n = 20), Guangzhou (n = 25), Vietnam (n = 38) and Thailand (n = 40) were conducted using purposive sampling and analysed using ethnographic principles.

Results

Each location produced three comparable themes: ‘viruses’: HPAI exemplified a periodic, natural, disease process therefore, deserving little concern. For some, science had ‘discovered’ something long known to farmers and lived with for generations. Others believe the virus to be new. Viral ecology was reasonably well understood among farmers, but less so by retailers and consumers; ‘husbandry practices’ included poor hygiene, overcrowding and industrial farming, modern commercial feed and veterinary drugs; ‘vulnerability factors’ included uncontrollable ‘external’ explanations involving the weather, seasonal changes, bird migrations and pollution.

Conclusions

Lay explanations were generally ecologically consistent. Nonetheless, beliefs that HPAI is a normal, recurrent process, external factors and roles of industrialized poultry rearing countered health worker claims of H5N1 seriousness for smallholders. These causal beliefs incorporate contemporary models of H5N1 ecology, but in a manner that contradicts public health efforts at control.

  W. H Zhu , L Yang , C. Q Jiang , L. Z Deng , T. H Lam , J. Y Zhang and S. S. C. Chan
  Background

Smoking cessation programs are well established in the West, but reports on smoking cessation clinics (SCCs) from China are lacking. On the basis of the Hong Kong experience and with strong support from Guangzhou Health Bureau, we established the first SCC in Guangzhou, China. The objective was to describe the characteristics of smokers, measure quit rates and examine predictors of successful quitting.

Methods

During 2006–08, 220 smokers received individual counseling following the five A's and five R's. No medications were used.

Results

At baseline, the mean (SD) age was 40 (14) years. Most (96%) were males, married (73%), currently employed (75%), college educated or above (54%); 77% had previous quitting attempts. By 14 May 2008, 195 reached the 6 months follow-up period. Of them, 79% (151/195) were successfully followed up, and 46 had quit. By intention to treat, the 6-month 7-day point prevalence quit rate was 24% [95% confidence interval (CI) 18–30%]. Smokers with more confidence in quitting or were at action stage were more successful in quitting with adjusted odds ratio of 2.39 (95% CI 1.01–5.30) and 5.50 (95% CI 1.08–28) respectively.

Conclusions

A pilot-model clinic free of charge and with systemic data collection, follow-up and evaluation should be a starting point for smoking cessation program in low-income countries.

 
 
 
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