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Articles by C. J Marsit
Total Records ( 4 ) for C. J Marsit
  A. A Chen , C. J Marsit , B. C Christensen , E.A Houseman , M. D McClean , J. F Smith , J. T Bryan , M. R Posner , H. H Nelson and K. T. Kelsey
 

Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infection is an etiologic factor in a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). It is unknown if host genetic susceptibility modifies the HPV16–HNSCC association. DNA samples collected as part of a Boston area case–control study of HNSCC were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the National Cancer Institute's SNP500Cancer database. Analysis of demographic, phenotypic and genotypic data for 319 HNSCC cases and 495 frequency-matched controls was performed using unconditional logistic regression. All reported P-values are two sided. We identified a polymorphism in the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter SLC23A2 that modifies the risk of HNSCC associated with HPV16 infection. Among those with a wild-type allele at SLC23A2, the risk of HNSCC associated with HPV16-positive serology was 5.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.2–7.8). However, among those with a homozygous variant genotype, the risk of HNSCC associated with HPV16 was attenuated [odds ratio (OR) = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.2–6.2]. Further, when we tested whether genotype modified the interaction between citrus exposure, HPV16, and HNSCC, we found a dramatically increased risk of HNSCC for those with a wild-type SLC23A2 allele, HPV16-positive serology and high citrus intake (OR = 7.4; 95% CI = 3.6–15.1). These results suggest that SLC23A2 genetic variation alters HPV16-associated HNSCC while also highlighting the important role of citrus exposure in this disease.

  B. C Christensen , B. J Moyer , M Avissar , L. G Ouellet , S. L Plaza , M. D McClean , C. J Marsit and K. T. Kelsey
 

MicroRNA (miRNA)-binding site polymorphisms that could contribute to disease risk and prognosis are rapidly being identified and investigated as this genetic variation may have a potentially profound impact on human health. A recently described variant allele in the KRAS 3' untranslated region that arises in the let-7 miRNA complementary site (KRAS-LCS6) and leads to increased KRAS expression in lung cancer was examined for its association with the occurrence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We examined the prevalence of the KRAS-LCS6 variant allele in a population-based case–control study of HNSCC to determine if this KRAS-LCS6 genotype was associated with disease occurrence and patient survival. Although the KRAS-LCS6 variant genotype was not associated with the overall risk of HNSCC, cases with the KRAS-LCS6 variant genotype had significantly reduced survival [hazard ratio (HR), 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0–2.5] in models controlled for confounders of survival. This risk was greatest in cases of oral cavity carcinoma (HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4–5.3). These data demonstrate that cases with the KRAS-LCS6 variant have significantly reduced survival time and suggest that this variant may alter the phenotype or therapeutic response of this disease.

  R. A Mason , E. V Morlock , M. R Karagas , K. T Kelsey , C. J Marsit , A. R Schned and A. S. Andrew
 

The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has recently been appreciated as a central mediator of tumorigenesis and an important drug target; however, the influence of genetic variation in this pathway on bladder cancer is not understood. Pathway activation leads to cell proliferation, angiogenesis and is antiapoptotic. We sought to test the hypothesis that bladder cancer susceptibility and survival are modified by inherited variations in the sequence of the EGFR and its pathway members. We tested associations using a population-based study of 857 bladder cancer cases and 1191 controls from New Hampshire. Multifactor dimensionality reduction software was used to predict gene–gene interactions. We detected an increased risk of bladder cancer associated with variant genotypes for the single nucleotide polymorphisms EGFR_03 [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0–2.8)] and EGFR_05 [adjusted OR 1.5 (95% CI 1.0–2.1)] compared with wild-type. EGFR variants experienced longer survival than those with wild-type alleles [e.g. adjusted hazard ratio EGFR_1808 0.3 (95% CI 0.1–0.9)]. In contrast, the variant form of the ligand, EGF_04, had worse survival [adjusted hazard ratio 1.5 (95% CI 1.0–2.3)] compared with wild-type. Our findings suggest modified bladder cancer risk and survival associated with genetic variation in the EGFR pathway. Understanding these genetic influences on increased bladder cancer susceptibility and survival may help in cancer prevention, drug development and choice of therapeutic regimen.

  D Baris , M. R Karagas , C Verrill , A Johnson , A. S Andrew , C. J Marsit , M Schwenn , J. S Colt , S Cherala , C Samanic , R Waddell , K. P Cantor , A Schned , N Rothman , J Lubin , J. F Fraumeni , R. N Hoover , K. T Kelsey and D. T. Silverman
  Background

Cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for bladder cancer. The effects of smoking duration, intensity (cigarettes per day), and total exposure (pack-years); smoking cessation; exposure to environmental tobacco smoke; and changes in the composition of tobacco and cigarette design over time on risk of bladder cancer are unclear.

Methods

We examined bladder cancer risk in relation to smoking practices based on interview data from a large, population-based case–control study conducted in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont from 2001 to 2004 (N = 1170 urothelial carcinoma case patients and 1413 control subjects). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using unconditional logistic regression. To examine changes in smoking-induced bladder cancer risk over time, we compared odds ratios from New Hampshire residents in this study (305 case patients and 335 control subjects) with those from two case–control studies conducted in New Hampshire in 1994–1998 and in 1998–2001 (843 case patients and 1183 control subjects).

Results

Regular and current cigarette smokers had higher risks of bladder cancer than never-smokers (for regular smokers, OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 2.4 to 3.6; for current smokers, OR = 5.2, 95% CI = 4.0 to 6.6). In New Hampshire, there was a statistically significant increasing trend in smoking-related bladder cancer risk over three consecutive periods (1994–1998, 1998–2001, and 2002–2004) among former smokers (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0 to 2.0; OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4 to 2.9; and OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.7 to 4.0, respectively) and current smokers (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 2.0 to 4.2; OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 2.8 to 6.3; OR = 5.5, 95% CI = 3.5 to 8.9, respectively) (P for homogeneity of trends over time periods = .04). We also observed that within categories of intensity, odds ratios increased approximately linearly with increasing pack-years smoked, but the slope of the increasing trend declined with increasing intensity.

Conclusions

Smoking-related risks of bladder cancer appear to have increased in New Hampshire since the mid-1990s. Based on our modeling of pack-years and intensity, smoking fewer cigarettes over a long time appears more harmful than smoking more cigarettes over a shorter time, for equal total pack-years of cigarettes smoked.

 
 
 
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