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Articles by C Lu
Total Records ( 6 ) for C Lu
  C Lu and R. D. King
 

Motivation: Distribution analysis is one of the most basic forms of statistical analysis. Thanks to improved analytical methods, accurate and extensive quantitative measurements can now be made of the mRNA, protein and metabolite from biological systems. Here, we report a large-scale analysis of the population abundance distributions of the transcriptomes, proteomes and metabolomes from varied biological systems.

Results: We compared the observed empirical distributions with a number of distributions: power law, lognormal, loglogistic, loggamma, right Pareto-lognormal (PLN) and double PLN (dPLN). The best-fit for mRNA, protein and metabolite population abundance distributions was found to be the dPLN. This distribution behaves like a lognormal distribution around the centre, and like a power law distribution in the tails. To better understand the cause of this observed distribution, we explored a simple stochastic model based on geometric Brownian motion. The distribution indicates that multiplicative effects are causally dominant in biological systems. We speculate that these effects arise from chemical reactions: the central-limit theorem then explains the central lognormal, and a number of possible mechanisms could explain the long tails: positive feedback, network topology, etc. Many of the components in the central lognormal parts of the empirical distributions are unidentified and/or have unknown function. This indicates that much more biology awaits discovery.

  C. J Guigon , L Fozzatti , C Lu , M. C Willingham and S. y. Cheng
 

Selective drugs targeting dysregulated oncogenic pathways are promising cancer therapies. Because the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is hyperactivated in human follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), we hypothesized that its inhibition could block cancer development and progression. We, therefore, analyzed the effect of a treatment with a specific mTORC1 inhibitor (RAD001) in a faithful mouse model of FTC with constitutive mTORC1 activation (TRβPV/PVPten+/– mice). The treatment did not prevent capsular and vascular invasion of the thyroid and the occurrence of lung metastasis. However, it substantially decelerated thyroid tumor growth, thereby prolonging TRβPV/PVPten+/– mouse life span. RAD001 efficiently inhibited mTORC1 activity, as shown by the reduced phosphorylation of its downstream targets involved in the activity of the translation machinery, such as ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP1) and the eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF-4B and eIF-4G. Whereas mTORC1 signaling inhibition did not alter cell apoptosis, it induced a significant decrease in cell proliferation that was associated with the reduced abundance and altered activity of key regulators of cell cycle progression. Altogether, our data indicate that mTORC1 signaling plays a major role in the integration of the mitogenic signal in FTC. Therefore, our preclinical study with a relevant mouse model of FTC demonstrates for the first time that RAD001 efficaciously stabilizes cancer growth although it does not prevent its fatal outcome. In conclusion, our work underscores that in the treatment of FTC patients, RAD001 can only be used in combination with drugs and therapies inducing tumor shrinkage and blocking metastasis.

  Z Xing , C Lu , D Hu , Y. y Yu , X Wang , C Colnot , M Nakamura , Y Wu , T Miclau and R. S. Marcucio
  Zhiqing Xing, Chuanyong Lu, Diane Hu, Yan-yiu Yu, Xiaodong Wang, Celine Colnot, Mary Nakamura, Yalei Wu, Theodore Miclau, and Ralph S. Marcucio

Bone injury induces an inflammatory response that involves neutrophils, macrophages and other inflammatory cells. The recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of injury occurs in response to specific signaling pathways. The CC chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) is crucial for recruiting macrophages, as well as regulating osteoclast function. In this study, we examined fracture healing in Ccr2–/– mice. We first demonstrated that the expression of Ccr2 transcripts and the filtration of macrophages into fracture calluses were most robust during the early phases of fracture healing. We then determined that the number of macrophages at the fracture site was significantly lower in Ccr2–/– mice compared with wild-type controls at 3 days after injury. As a result, impaired vascularization, decreased formation of callus, and delayed maturation of cartilage were observed at 7 days after injury in mutant mice. At day 14, Ccr2–/– mice had less bone in their calluses. At day 21, Ccr2–/– mice had larger calluses and more bone compared with wild-type mice, suggesting a delayed remodeling. In addition, we examined the effect of Ccr2 mutation on osteoclasts. We found that a lack of Ccr2 did not affect the number of osteoclasts within fracture calluses at 21 days after injury. However, Ccr2–/– osteoclasts exhibited a decreased ability to resorb bone compared with wild-type cells, which could contribute to the delayed remodeling of fracture calluses observed in Ccr2–/– mice. Collectively, these results indicate that a deficiency of Ccr2 reduces the infiltration of macrophages and impairs the function of osteoclasts, leading to delayed fracture healing.

  S. W Grimm , H. J Einolf , S. D Hall , K He , H. K Lim , K. H. J Ling , C Lu , A. A Nomeir , E Seibert , K. W Skordos , G. R Tonn , R Van Horn , R. W Wang , Y. N Wong , T. J Yang and R. S. Obach
 

Time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes caused by new molecular entities (NMEs) is of concern because such compounds can be responsible for clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDI). Although the biochemistry underlying mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of P450 enzymes has been generally understood for several years, significant advances have been made only in the past few years regarding how in vitro time-dependent inhibition data can be used to understand and predict clinical DDI. In this article, a team of scientists from 16 pharmaceutical research organizations that are member companies of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America offer a discussion of the phenomenon of TDI with emphasis on the laboratory methods used in its measurement. Results of an anonymous survey regarding pharmaceutical industry practices and strategies around TDI are reported. Specific topics that still possess a high degree of uncertainty are raised, such as parameter estimates needed to make predictions of DDI magnitude from in vitro inactivation parameters. A description of follow-up mechanistic experiments that can be done to characterize TDI are described. A consensus recommendation regarding common practices to address TDI is included, the salient points of which include the use of a tiered approach wherein abbreviated assays are first used to determine whether NMEs demonstrate TDI or not, followed by more thorough inactivation studies for those that do to define the parameters needed for prediction of DDI.

  S. W Grimm , H. J Einolf , S. D Hall , K He , H. K Lim , K. H. J Ling , C Lu , A. A Nomeir , E Seibert , K. W Skordos , G. R Tonn , R Van Horn , R. W Wang , Y. N Wong , T. J Yang and R. S. Obach
 

Time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes caused by new molecular entities (NMEs) is of concern because such compounds can be responsible for clinically relevant drug-drug interactions (DDI). Although the biochemistry underlying mechanism-based inactivation (MBI) of P450 enzymes has been generally understood for several years, significant advances have been made only in the past few years regarding how in vitro time-dependent inhibition data can be used to understand and predict clinical DDI. In this article, a team of scientists from 16 pharmaceutical research organizations that are member companies of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America offer a discussion of the phenomenon of TDI with emphasis on the laboratory methods used in its measurement. Results of an anonymous survey regarding pharmaceutical industry practices and strategies around TDI are reported. Specific topics that still possess a high degree of uncertainty are raised, such as parameter estimates needed to make predictions of DDI magnitude from in vitro inactivation parameters. A description of follow-up mechanistic experiments that can be done to characterize TDI are described. A consensus recommendation regarding common practices to address TDI is included, the salient points of which include the use of a tiered approach wherein abbreviated assays are first used to determine whether NMEs demonstrate TDI or not, followed by more thorough inactivation studies for those that do to define the parameters needed for prediction of DDI.

  J. W Lee , H. D Han , M. M. K Shahzad , S. W Kim , L. S Mangala , A. M Nick , C Lu , R. R Langley , R Schmandt , H. S Kim , S Mao , J Gooya , C Fazenbaker , D Jackson , D. A Tice , C. N Landen , R. L Coleman and A. K. Sood
  Background

EphA2 is overexpressed in many types of human cancer but is absent or expressed at low levels in normal epithelial tissues. We investigated whether a novel immunoconjugate containing an anti-EphA2 monoclonal antibody (1C1) linked to a chemotherapeutic agent (monomethyl auristatin phenylalanine [MMAF]) through a noncleavable linker maleimidocaproyl (mc) had antitumor activity against ovarian cancer cell lines and tumor models.

Methods

Specificity of 1C1-mcMMAF was examined in EphA2-positive HeyA8 and EphA2-negative SKMel28 ovarian cancer cells by antibody binding and internalization assays. Controls were phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), 1C1, or control IgG-mcMMAF. Viability and apoptosis were investigated in ovarian cancer cell lines and tumor models (10 mice per group). Antitumor activities were tested in the HeyA8-luc and SKOV3ip1 orthotopic mouse models of ovarian cancer. Endothelial cells were identified by use of immunohistochemistry and anti-CD31 antibodies. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

The 1C1-mcMMAF immunoconjugate specifically bound to EphA2-positive HeyA8 cells but not to EphA2-negative cells and was internalized by HeyA8 cells. Treatment with 1C1-mcMMAF decreased the viability of HeyA8-luc cells in an EphA2-specific manner. In orthotopic mouse models, treatment with 1C1-mcMMAF inhibited tumor growth by 85%–98% compared with that in control mice (eg, for weight of HeyA8 tumors, 1C1-mcMMAF = 0.05 g and control = 1.03 g; difference = 0.98 g, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.40 to 1.58 g; P = .001). Even in bulkier disease models with HeyA8-luc cells, 1C1-mcMMAF treatment, compared with control treatment, caused regression of established tumors and increased survival of the mice (eg, 1C1-mcMMAF vs control, mean = 60.6 days vs 29.4 days; difference = 31.2 days, 95% CI = 27.6 to 31.2 days; P = .001). The antitumor effects of 1C1-mcMMAF therapy, in SKOV3ip1 tumors, for example, were statistically significantly related to decreased proliferation (eg, 1C1-mcMMAF vs control, mean = 44.1% vs 55.8% proliferating cells; difference = 11.7%, 95% CI = 2.45% to 20.9%; P = .01) and increased apoptosis of tumor cells (eg, 1C1-mcMMAF vs control, mean = 8.6% vs 0.9% apoptotic cells; difference = 7.7%, 95% CI = 3.8% to 11.7%; P < .001) and of mouse endothelial cells (eg, 1C1-mcMMAF vs control, mean 2.8% vs 0.4% apoptotic endothelial cells; difference = 2.4%, 95% CI = 1.4% to 4.6%; P = .034).

Conclusion

The 1C1-mcMMAF immunoconjugate had antitumor activity in preclinical models of ovarian carcinoma.

 
 
 
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