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Articles by Bruno Vellas
Total Records ( 5 ) for Bruno Vellas
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Jordi Cami , Sandrine Andrieu , Jesus Avila , Merce Boada Rovira , Monique Breteler , Lutz Froelich , Serge Gauthier , Teresa Gomez- Isla , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Eric B. Larson , Oscar L. Lopez , Jose Manuel Martinez- Lage , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard D. Schellenberg , Jordi Sunyer , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  In recognition of the global problem posed by Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, an international think-tank meeting was convened by Biocat, the Pasqual Maragall Foundation, and the Lou Ruvo Brain Institute in February 2009. The meeting initiated the planning of a European Union-North American collaborative research enterprise to expedite the delay and ultimate prevention of dementing disorders. The key aim is to build parallel and complementary research infrastructure that will support international standardization and inter-operability among researchers in both continents. The meeting identified major challenges, opportunities for research resources and support, integration with ongoing efforts, and identification of key domains to influence the design and administration of the enterprise.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Deborah Barnes , Richard Einstein , Sterling Johnson , Virginia Lee , Allen Roses , Mark A. Sager , William R. Shankle , Peter J. Snyder , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard Schellenberg , John Trojanowski , Paul Aisen , Marilyn S. Albert , John C.S. Breitner , Neil Buckholtz , Maria Carrillo , Steven Ferris , Barry D. Greenberg , Michael Grundman , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Oscar L. Lopez , Paul Maruff , Richard C. Mohs , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Creighton Phelps , Eric Reiman , Marwan Sabbagh , Mary Sano , Lon S. Schneider , Eric Siemers , Pierre Tariot , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  Among the major impediments to the design of clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most critical is the lack of validated biomarkers, assessment tools, and algorithms that would facilitate identification of asymptomatic individuals with elevated risk who might be recruited as study volunteers. Thus, the Leon Thal Symposium 2009 (LTS'09), on October 27–28, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada, was convened to explore strategies to surmount the barriers in designing a multisite, comparative study to evaluate and validate various approaches for detecting and selecting asymptomatic people at risk for cognitive disorders/dementia. The deliberations of LTS'09 included presentations and reviews of different approaches (algorithms, biomarkers, or measures) for identifying asymptomatic individuals at elevated risk for AD who would be candidates for longitudinal or prevention studies. The key nested recommendations of LTS'09 included: (1) establishment of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies as a shared research core resource; (2) launch of a large collaborative study that will compare multiple screening approaches and biomarkers to determine the best method for identifying asymptomatic people at risk for AD; (3) initiation of a Global Database that extends the concept of the National Database for Longitudinal Studies for longitudinal studies beyond the United States; and (4) development of an educational campaign that will address public misconceptions about AD and promote healthy brain aging.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Ronald C. Petersen , Peter J. Snyder , Ara S. Khachaturian , Paul Aisen , Mony de Leon , Barry D. Greenberg , Walter Kukull , Paul Maruff , Reisa A. Sperling , Yaakov Stern , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas , Sandrine Andrieu , Michael W. Weiner , Maria C. Carrillo and Lisa J. Bain
  The fourth Leon Thal Symposium (LTS2010) was convened in Toulouse, France, on November 3, 2010. This symposium reviewed design parameters that are necessary to develop comprehensive national databases on healthy aging. Such datasets offer the potential to serve as the foundation for a systems-approach to solve the dual public health problems of: (1) early detection of people who are at elevated risk for Alzheimer‘s disease, and (2) the development of interventions to delay onset of, or prevent, late-life dementia. The symposium considered three interrelated components of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies on Healthy Aging as follows: (a) a registry of healthy aging adults; (b) refined computer-based assessments for data gathering, including assessments of behavioral/memory changes associated with aging that are appropriate for broad use in nonexpert settings; and (c) high performance computing/supercomputer-based approaches for health data modeling and mining
  Sophie Gillette- Guyonnet , Sandrine Andrieu , Fati Nourhashemi , Virginie Gardette , Nicola Coley , Christelle Cantet , Serge Gauthier , Pierre-Jean Ousset and Bruno Vellas
  Background Patients with Alzheimer‘s disease (AD), even in the presence of symptomatic relief from medical intervention, face a persistent worsening of cognitive decline and performance in activities of daily living. Data regarding the long-term disease progression outside of therapeutic trials are lacking. We examined the effects of standard of care for AD patients on the prognosis of the disease in a real-life study over a 4-year period. Methods A total of 686 patients with mild-moderate AD were enrolled in 16 memory clinics (REseau sur la maladie d‘ Alzheimer FRancais [REAL.FR] cohort) and followed up twice annually with tools used in therapeutic trials (Mini-Mental Status Examination, Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale [ADAS-cog]: cognitive function, Clinical Dementia Rating: dementia severity, Activity of Daily Living [ADL]: incapacities, NeuroPsychiatric Inventory: neuropsychiatric symptom). Results More than 90% of the patients used AD-specific medication over 4 years. Patients lost on average 2.4 points per year on the Mini-Mental Status Examination and gained 4.5 points on the ADAS-cog. ADL and NeuroPsychiatric Inventory scores became significantly worse over time. Incidence of incapacities for ADL and worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms were 52.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 47.7–57.4) and 51.1 (95% CI: 46.2–56.1), respectively. Rates of mortality and institutionalization were 7.4 (95% CI: 6.2–8.5) and 13.4 (95% CI: 11.7–15.1). In all, 17% of patients in mild stage at baseline (Clinical Dementia Rating = 0.5) did not experience a major event (functional disabilities, neuropsychiatric symptoms, or death) over a 4-year period. Conclusions As compared with previous surveys, the current study shows slower rates of decline in AD patients. The present data also underline the high level of variability of disease progression among AD patients. Outcome measures commonly used in clinical trials will need to take into account the recent changes in the prognosis of the disease.
  Nicola Coley , Sandrine Andrieu , Mark Jaros , Michael Weiner , Jesse Cedarbaum and Bruno Vellas
  Background Clinical measures continue to be used as primary endpoints for disease-modifying trials for Alzheimer‘s disease (AD). Currently, two co-primary endpoints must be specified, which measure cognitive and functional impairments. Generally, the Alzheimer‘s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) is one of the co-primary endpoints, but high variability in this measure results in large sample sizes. We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB) to assess its suitability as a single primary endpoint as an alternative to the traditional co-primary approach. Methods Internal consistency, structural and convergent validity, and 2-year internal and external responsiveness of the CDR-SB were assessed in 667 very mild to moderate (global Clinical Dementia Rating, 0.5–2) AD patients from the REAL.FR (Reseau sur la Maladie d'Alzheimer Francais) study. Results The CDR-SB showed good internal consistency (Cronbach‘s alpha = 0.88), and acceptable structural (separate ”cognitive“ and ”functional“ factors) and convergent validity. Variability in mean changes over time was low, leading to excellent internal responsiveness (effect size = 1.2; standardized response mean = 1.17 at 2 years) and smaller sample sizes as compared with the ADAS-Cog. External responsiveness was acceptable when compared with ”clinically meaningful“ changes on the Activities of Daily Living scale but only borderline acceptable when compared with the ADAS-Cog and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. Levels of missing data and floor/ceiling effects were low. Conclusions The CDR-SB measures cognitive and functional impairment simultaneously, and has excellent 2-year internal responsiveness. This makes it a promising candidate as a sole primary endpoint for AD trials, although more work is required to determine the clinical relevance of CDR-SB changes, and its usefulness as an endpoint at other disease stages.
 
 
 
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