Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by Bruce D. Walker
Total Records ( 7 ) for Bruce D. Walker
  Victoria Kasprowicz , Julian Schulze zur Wiesch , Thomas Kuntzen , Brian E. Nolan , Steven Longworth , Andrew Berical , Jenna Blum , Cory McMahon , Laura L. Reyor , Nahel Elias , William W. Kwok , Barbara G. McGovern , Gordon Freeman , Raymond T. Chung , Paul Klenerman , Lia Lewis-Ximenez , Bruce D. Walker , Todd M. Allen , Arthur Y. Kim and Georg M. Lauer
  We monitored expression of PD-1 (a mediator of T-cell exhaustion and viral persistence) on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells from blood and liver during acute and chronic infections and after the resolved infection stage. PD-1 expression on HCV-specific T cells was high early in acute infection irrespective of clinical outcome, and most cells continued to express PD-1 in resolved and chronic stages of infection; intrahepatic expression levels were especially high. Our results suggest that an analysis of PD-1 expression alone is not sufficient to predict infection outcome or to determine T-cell functionality in HCV infection.
  Aviva Joseph , Jian Hua Zheng , Antonia Follenzi , Teresa DiLorenzo , Kaori Sango , Jaime Hyman , Ken Chen , Alicja Piechocka-Trocha , Christian Brander , Erik Hooijberg , Dario A. Vignali , Bruce D. Walker and Harris Goldstein
  The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific CD8 cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response plays a critical role in controlling HIV-1 replication. Augmenting this response should enhance control of HIV-1 replication and stabilize or improve the clinical course of the disease. Although cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in immunocompromised patients can be treated by adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded CMV- or EBV-specific CTLs, adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded, autologous HIV-1-specific CTLs had minimal effects on HIV-1 replication, likely a consequence of the inherently compromised qualitative function of HIV-1-specific CTLs derived from HIV-1-infected individuals. We hypothesized that this limitation could be circumvented by using as an alternative source of HIV-1-specific CTLs, autologous peripheral CD8+ T lymphocytes whose antigen specificity is redirected by transduction with lentiviral vectors encoding HIV-1-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) α and β chains, an approach used successfully in cancer therapy. To efficiently convert peripheral CD8 lymphocytes into HIV-1-specific CTLs that potently suppress in vivo HIV-1 replication, we constructed lentiviral vectors encoding the HIV-1-specific TCR α and TCR β chains cloned from a CTL clone specific for an HIV Gag epitope, SL9, as a single transcript linked with a self-cleaving peptide. We demonstrated that transduction with this lentiviral vector efficiently converted primary human CD8 lymphocytes into HIV-1-specific CTLs with potent in vitro and in vivo HIV-1-specific activity. Using lentiviral vectors encoding an HIV-1-specific TCR to transform peripheral CD8 lymphocytes into HIV-1-specific CTLs with defined specificities represents a new immunotherapeutic approach to augment the HIV-1-specific immunity of infected patients.
  Arne Schneidewind , Mark A. Brockman , John Sidney , Yaoyu E. Wang , Huabiao Chen , Todd J. Suscovich , Bin Li , Rahma I. Adam , Rachel L. Allgaier , Bianca R. Mothe , Thomas Kuntzen , Cesar Oniangue-Ndza , Alicja Trocha , Xu G. Yu , Christian Brander , Alessandro Sette , Bruce D. Walker and Todd M. Allen
  Control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by HLA-B27-positive subjects has been linked to an immunodominant CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response targeting the conserved KK10 epitope (KRWIILGLNK263-272) in p24/Gag. Viral escape in KK10 typically occurs through development of an R264K substitution in conjunction with the upstream compensatory mutation S173A, and the difficulty of the virus to escape from the immune response against the KK10 epitope until late in infection has been associated with slower clinical progression. Rare alternative escape mutations at R264 have been observed, but factors dictating the preferential selection of R264K remain unclear. Here we illustrate that while all observed R264 mutations (K, G, Q, and T) reduced peptide binding to HLA-B27 and impaired viral replication, the replicative defects of the alternative mutants were actually less pronounced than those for R264K. Importantly, however, none of these mutants replicated as well as an R264K variant containing the compensatory mutation S173A. In assessing the combined effects of viral replication and CTL escape using an in vitro coculture assay, we further observed that the compensated R264K mutant also displayed the highest replication capacity in the presence of KK10-specific CTLs. Comparisons of codon usage for the respective variants indicated that generation of the R264K mutation may also be favored due to a G-to-A bias in nucleotide substitutions during HIV-1 replication. Together, these data suggest that the preference for R264K is due primarily to the ability of the S173A-compensated virus to replicate better than alternative variants in the presence of CTLs, suggesting that viral fitness is a key contributor for the selection of immune escape variants.
  Christine M. Rousseau , Marcus G. Daniels , Jonathan M. Carlson , Carl Kadie , Hayley Crawford , Andrew Prendergast , Philippa Matthews , Rebecca Payne , Morgane Rolland , Dana N. Raugi , Brandon S. Maust , Gerald H. Learn , David C. Nickle , Hoosen Coovadia , Thumbi Ndung’u , Nicole Frahm , hristian Brander , Bruce D. Walker , Philip J . R. Goulder , Tanmoy Bhattacharya , David E . Heckerman , Bette T. Korber and James I. Mullins
  Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutations that confer escape from cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) recognition can sometimes result in lower viral fitness. These mutations can then revert upon transmission to a new host in the absence of CTL-mediated immune selection pressure restricted by the HLA alleles of the prior host. To identify these potentially critical recognition points on the virus, we assessed HLA-driven viral evolution using three phylogenetic correction methods across full HIV-1 subtype C proteomes from a cohort of 261 South Africans and identified amino acids conferring either susceptibility or resistance to CTLs. A total of 558 CTL-susceptible and -resistant HLA-amino acid associations were identified and organized into 310 immunological sets (groups of individual associations related to a single HLA/epitope combination). Mutations away from seven susceptible residues, including four in Gag, were associated with lower plasma viral-RNA loads (q < 0.2 [where q is the expected false-discovery rate]) in individuals with the corresponding HLA alleles. The ratio of susceptible to resistant residues among those without the corresponding HLA alleles varied in the order Vpr > Gag > Rev > Pol > Nef > Vif > Tat > Env > Vpu (Fisher’s exact test; P ≤ 0.0009 for each comparison), suggesting the same ranking of fitness costs by genes associated with CTL escape. Significantly more HLA-B (χ2; P = 3.59 x 10–5) and HLA-C (χ2; P = 4.71 x 10–6) alleles were associated with amino acid changes than HLA-A, highlighting their importance in driving viral evolution. In conclusion, specific HIV-1 residues (enriched in Vpr, Gag, and Rev) and HLA alleles (particularly B and C) confer susceptibility to the CTL response and are likely to be important in the development of vaccines targeted to decrease the viral load.
  Zabrina L. Brumme , Chanson J. Brumme , Jonathan Carlson , Hendrik Streeck , Mina John , Quentin Eichbaum , Brian L. Block , Brett Baker , Carl Kadie , Martin Markowitz , Heiko Jessen , Anthony D. Kelleher , Eric Rosenberg , John Kaldor , Yuko Yuki , Mary Carrington , Todd M. Allen , Simon Mallal , Marcus Altfeld , David Heckerman and Bruce D. Walker
  During acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, early host cellular immune responses drive viral evolution. The rates and extent of these mutations, however, remain incompletely characterized. In a cohort of 98 individuals newly infected with HIV-1 subtype B, we longitudinally characterized the rates and extent of HLA-mediated escape and reversion in Gag, Pol, and Nef using a rational definition of HLA-attributable mutation based on the analysis of a large independent subtype B data set. We demonstrate rapid and dramatic HIV evolution in response to immune pressures that in general reflect established cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response hierarchies in early infection. On a population level, HLA-driven evolution was observed in ~80% of published CTL epitopes. Five of the 10 most rapidly evolving epitopes were restricted by protective HLA alleles (HLA-B*13/B*51/B*57/B*5801; P = 0.01), supporting the importance of a strong early CTL response in HIV control. Consistent with known fitness costs of escape, B*57-associated mutations in Gag were among the most rapidly reverting positions upon transmission to non-B*57-expressing individuals, whereas many other HLA-associated polymorphisms displayed slow or negligible reversion. Overall, an estimated minimum of 30% of observed substitutions in Gag/Pol and 60% in Nef were attributable to HLA-associated escape and reversion events. Results underscore the dominant role of immune pressures in driving early within-host HIV evolution. Dramatic differences in escape and reversion rates across codons, genes, and HLA restrictions are observed, highlighting the complexity of viral adaptation to the host immune response.
  Toshiyuki Miura , Mark A. Brockman , Chanson J. Brumme , Zabrina L. Brumme , Jonathan M. Carlson , Florencia Pereyra , Alicja Trocha , Marylyn M. Addo , Brian L. Block , Alissa C. Rothchild , Brett M. Baker , Theresa Flynn , Arne Schneidewind , Bin Li , Yaoyu E. Wang , David Heckerman , Todd M. Allen and Bruce D. Walker
  Despite reports of viral genetic defects in persons who control human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the absence of antiviral therapy, the extent to which such defects contribute to the long-term containment of viremia is not known. Most previous studies examining for such defects have involved small numbers of subjects, primarily focused on subjects expressing HLA-B57, or have examined single viral genes, and they have focused on cellular proviral DNA rather than plasma viral RNA sequences. Here, we attempted viral sequencing from 95 HIV-1 elite controllers (EC) who maintained plasma viral loads of <50 RNA copies/ml in the absence of therapy, the majority of whom did not express HLA-B57. HIV-1 gene fragments were obtained from 94% (89/95) of the EC, and plasma viral sequences were obtained from 78% (61/78), the latter indicating the presence of replicating virus in the majority of EC. Of 63 persons for whom nef was sequenced, only three cases of nef deletions were identified, and gross genetic defects were rarely observed in other HIV-1 coding genes. In a codon-by-codon comparison between EC and persons with progressive infection, correcting for HLA bias and coevolving secondary mutations, a significant difference was observed at only three codons in Gag, all three of which represented the historic population consensus amino acid at the time of infection. These results indicate that the spontaneous control of HIV replication is not attributable to shared viral genetic defects or shared viral polymorphisms.
  Philippa C. Matthews , Andrew Prendergast , Alasdair Leslie , Hayley Crawford , Rebecca Payne , Christine Rousseau , Morgane Rolland , Isobella Honeyborne , Jonathan Carlson , Carl Kadie , Christian Brander , Karen Bishop , Nonkululeko Mlotshwa , James I . Mullins , Hoosen Coovadia , Thumbi Ndung’u , Bruce D. Walker , David Heckerman and Philip J . R. Goulder
  Much uncertainty still exists over what T-cell responses need to be induced by an effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine. Previous studies have hypothesized that the effective CD8+ T-cell responses are those driving the selection of escape mutations that reduce viral fitness and therefore revert posttransmission. In this study, we adopted a novel approach to define better the role of reverting escape mutations in immune control of HIV infection. This analysis of sequences from 710 study subjects with chronic C-clade HIV type 1 infection demonstrates the importance of mutations that impose a fitness cost in the control of viremia. Consistent with previous studies, the viral set points associated with each HLA-B allele are strongly correlated with the number of Gag-specific polymorphisms associated with the relevant HLA-B allele (r = –0.56, P = 0.0034). The viral set points associated with each HLA-C allele were also strongly correlated with the number of Pol-specific polymorphisms associated with the relevant HLA-C allele (r = –0.67, P = 0.0047). However, critically, both these correlations were dependent solely on the polymorphisms identified as reverting. Therefore, despite the inevitable evolution of viral escape, viremia can be controlled through the selection of mutations that are detrimental to viral fitness. The significance of these results is in highlighting the rationale for an HIV vaccine that can induce these broad responses.
 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility