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Articles by Belgacem Hanchi
Total Records ( 7 ) for Belgacem Hanchi
  Mohamed Anis El hammadi , Melika Trabelsi , Amel Jrad , Habib Gannouchi and Belgacem Hanchi
  In Tunisia, we have an increasingly growing sewage sludge production. Therefore, evaluation of its valorisation is essential. Composting has emerged as a valuable route for the disposal of urban waste, with the prospect of applying composts on arable fields as organic amendments. A comparative study was made for major nutrient elements or macronutrients (include carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium) and the micronutrient elements mostly used (manganese and magnesium) present in the activated sludge taken from the municipal wastewater plant of Charguia in the capital of Tunisia and the produced compost made from the above sludge (13.37 C/N ratios). K, Fe and Mn concentrations were more important in the maturity compost. The original sludge shows a higher C, N, P, Ca and Mg contents. An important observation was that the amount of heavy metals and E. coli present in the final product is lower than the amount mentioned for the waste compost use in French norms, showing that the final compost was not toxic.
  Mohamed Anis El Hammadi , Melika Trabelsi and Belgacem Hanchi
  With the increasingly growing production of textile sludge in Tunisia, evaluation of its use in composting process is essential. The sludge was produced in a textile manufacture in north of Tunisia and the composting system designed involved open piles turned periodically over a period of 3 months proved to be inexpensive and reliable. This experiment examined co-composting of textile sludge with green waste at 1:1 v/v (pile 1) and 1:3 v/v (pile 2) ratios in periodically turned outdoor piles, which were sampled for analysis after the beginning of the composting process. Changes in the composition of the two mixtures were determined by monitoring chemical and microbiological parameters. The produced compost C1 shows a higher C, N, pH and dry matter contents. Organic matter concentration at the end of composting was lower in C1 than C2. The amount of heavy metals and pathogens present in the final product is lower than the amount mentioned for the waste compost use in French norms.
  Mohamed Anis El Hammadi , Melika Trabelsi and Belgacem Hanchi
  The composting of textile sludge is an alternative to the traditional disposal of residues and also involves a commitment to reducing the production of waste products. A comparative study was made for major nutrient elements or macronutrients (include carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, calcium) and the micronutrient elements mostly used (sodium, magnesium) present in the textile sludge taken from the a textile-wastewater treatment plant in the north of Tunisia. The two produced composts were made from the above sludge, mixed in two proportion (1:1 and 1:3 sludge and green plant waste (v/v)). The two produced composts showed higher C, N, Ca, Mg, K, P and lower Na contents than the above sludge. Sludge composting reduce the Na content of the sludge, provide a stabilized organic matter and improve the physicochemical properties of the textile sludge. However, other studies are necessary for a complete evaluation of the two produced composts before land application.
  Mohamed Anis El Hammadi , Melika Trabelsi and Belgacem Hanchi
  During composting, the humification of organic matter will have a significant effect on the total heavy metal contents in the produced compost(s).Therefore the present study was conducted to Investigate the effect of co-composting textile sewage sludge with greenwaste on heavy metal amounts in the produced composts. This experiment examined co-composting of textile sludge with greenwaste at 1:1 v/v (pile 1) and 1:3 v/v (pile 2)) ratios. After the 90 days composting period, the produced compost 1 led to the greater concentration of heavy metals. An important observation was that metal contents in the two composts was similar for Cd and Fe and different for Mn, Cu and Cr. Although both mature composts had total heavy metal lower than the French limit values of composts to be used as soil fertilizer, it is necessary to take precautions when spreading teese produced products in natural areas.
  Mohamed Anis El Hammadi , Melika Trabelsi and Belgacem Hanchi
  The present research attempts to ascertain the efficacy of low cost technology (in our case, composting) as a bioremediation technique for reducing detergent and chlore content of textile sludge in semiarid conditions. The sludge was produced in a textile manifacture in the north of Tunisia. The composting system designed involved two parallel open air piles turned periodically over a period of 3-months. Textile sludge was co-composted with greenwaste at (1:1 v/v (compost C1) and 1:3 v/v (compost C2) ratio. In C1, the detregent and chlore contents was reduced respectively by 95,19 and 96.35% in 3 months, compared with the 86.66% efficacy reduction content of chlore in C1 and the increase by 46.34% in C2. The degree of xenobiotics in the first mixture and after composting in C1 was influenced by the introduction of higher sludge ratio. Results from this study demonstrate that co-composting textile sludge with greenwaste may provide an inexpensive and reliable technology for the biodegradation of sludge toxic compounds for further agriculture use.
  Mohamed Anis El Hammadi , Melika Trabelsi and Belgacem Hanchi
  In this study, physico-chemical variables, monitored before and during composting of different mixtures with different ratios were combined to obtain an overall statistical evaluation of the composting process. The study shows that there was statistically a clear positive relationship between Organic Matter (OM) and several parameters such as C and C/N. However, negative but well correlation between detergent and heavy metals as well as negative correlation between OM and heavy metals were also observed suggesting that there is an interaction between them. On the other hand, the data obtained showed important variations of detergent and some heavy metal contents (Fe and Cu) in the composting site. The obtained data provided valuable information concerning changes and relationship between several toxicants and composting parameters. However, further analytical research on the distribution of detergent degradation products and their cumulative effects on sludge composts are needed along.
  Mohamed Anis El Hammadi , Melika Trabelsi and Belgacem Hanchi
  Aliphatic hydrocarbons are one of the most widespread contaminants in the textile wastes. In the present study, technology of windrow composting was used in order to explore a bioremediation process of these contaminants for a textile sludge restoration in Tunisia. Initially, greenwaste were added in two different proportions to the sludge received from a textile-wastewater treatment plant in the north of Tunisia, mixed thoroughly and the composting process was carried on for 3 months. The thermogenic phase improved the hygiene of the two final products. Samples of sludge and the final composts were extracted with hexane (100%), the extracts were purified on a silica gel and concentrated with evaporation. The gas chromatography analysis of the sludge sample showed the presence of a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbons, ranging from C18 to C30. The total hydrocarbon content in the sludge was 81 mg kg-1 dry weight, decreased in the 2 final composts and was lower than 27 mg kg-1 dry weight in C1 and C2, respectively. The results revealed a decrease of sludge aliphatic hydrocarbon content after composting. The integration of other analytical and toxicological data is necessary to properly assess the bioremediation efficiency of the sludge composting process.
 
 
 
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