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Articles by B.I. Nwagu
Total Records ( 5 ) for B.I. Nwagu
  M.K. Ajala , B.I. Nwagu , A.A. Sekoni and A.O.K. Adesehinwa
  An investigation was carried out in October 2004 to November 2005 on the profitability of turkey production in the Zaria area of Kaduna State, Nigeria. A survey of 50 turkey producers spread over 2 local government areas in the state (Sabon-gari LGA and Giwa LGA) were made. Structured questionnaires were employed to elicit information from the respondents. Statistical analysis was accomplished by means of descriptive statistics, cost and profitability analyses. Findings of the study indicated that turkey production was carried out mainly by adult males. Although most of the respondents had formal education, they are mostly not so experienced in turkey production. Turkey production in Kaduna state was generally a part-time occupation as respondents are engaged in other primary occupations. Diseases of turkeys reported by respondents were mainly ectoparasites and fowl pox. Cost analysis showed that feed cost accounted for as much as 36.5% of total cost of production while fixed inputs and variable inputs accounted for 34% and 66% of the total cost of production respectively. Turkey production in the study area was found to be profitable with a profitability index of 0.35, a rate of return on fixed asset of 258% and return on variable cost of 182%. Turkey production constraints include unavailability and high cost of poults, high cost of feeds, low hatchability rate, low reproductive potential, diseases/morbidity and mortality among others. The need and means of improving turkey production were highlighted.
  I.A. Adeyinka , O.O. Oni , B.I. Nwagu and F.D. Adeyinka
  The chicks used in this experiment were obtained from a population of naked neck broiler chickens that has been kept in NAPRI since 1998. Six Hundred chicks were obtained from four hatches, one week apart. At hatch, pedigreed chicks were wing-banded and housed on deep litter in an open house. Body weights were measured biweekly up to 8 weeks of age. Other measurements taken include Neck length, Back length, keel length and breast angle. The general least square means were 37.22 ± 0.32, 210.46 ± 1.97, 744.33 ± 4.31, 1351.3 ± 7.91 and 2428.1 ± 14.61g for wt at day old (WT0D), weight at 2 weeks (WT14D), weight at 4 weeks (WT28D), weight at 6 weeks (WT42D) and weight at 8 weeks (WT56D), respectively. While measurements taken included Neck length, Back length, keel length and breast which were 7.31 ± 0.06, 15.99 ± 0.05, 5.63 ± 0.04, 10.44 ± 0.04cm respectively. The heritability estimates ranged from low value of 3.013 ± 0.08 for keel length to 0.315 ± 0.22 for WT0D. There were negative genetic correlations between WT0D and other traits. This study showed that additive heritabilities are low for linear body measurement and moderate for body weight for naked neck chickens during rearing.
  I.A. Adeyinka , O.O. Oni , B.I. Nwagu and F.D. Adeyinka
  The data used to calculate the variance components of various production traits was obtained from records of about 4000 hens daughters of about 180 cocks mated to about 1,500 dams and collected over 5 year period. Two strains of Rhode Island Chickens were involved in this study. Within the red strain population sire`s contribution to total variation in age at first egg did not exceed 8.6% across the year and 6.9% in the white strain. Except for body weight at 40 weeks of the red strain where the contribution of the sire exceed 14%, the contribution of the sire to the total variation for all the economic traits considered in this study were generally low for both strain of the layer type chickens under consideration. Generally dam component of variance were higher most of the time and in many traits within the red strain population.
  B.I. Nwagu , S.A.S. Olorunju , O.O. Oni , L.O. Eduvie , I.A. Adeyinka , A.A. Sekoni and F.O. Abeke
  Data from 4336 pullets progeny of 144 sires and 779 dams for strain A and 4843 pullets, progeny of 158 sires and 1108 dams for strain B belonging to 5 generations under selection for part-period egg production to 280 days of age were used for this study. The number of pullets housed at about 18weeks per population ranged from 326 and 1000 per generation for each of the population. The effective number of parents in each generation averaged 174 and 187 for male and female populations, respectively. The traits measured were egg number to 280 days (EGG280 D), age at sexual maturity (ASM), egg weight average (EWTAV) and body weight at 40 weeks of age (BWT40). The co-efficient of inbreeding per generation due to finite population size was 0.005 for both the male and the female lines respectively. For the control population the values obtained were 0.008 vs 0.007 for both the male and female lines respectively. The average performance of the birds over the study period for the male and female lines respectively ranged from 38.38 vs 50.94 and 37.03 vs 51.25 for EGG280 D, 194 vs 212 and 197 vs 214 for ASM, 48.29 vs 55.93 and 48.29 vs 55.11 for EWTAV, 1600 vs 1754 and 1440 vs 1908 for BWT40.The effective number of parent in each generation averaging about 175 probably caused an average inbreeding of about 0.5% per generation. Although the level of inbreeding in this population is not critical there is evidence of an increasing trend, which could lead to homozygosity in the flock. There is need to widen the genetic base to prevent selection depression too early in the flock.
  B.I. Nwagu , S.A.S. Olorunju , O.O. Oni , L.O. Eduvie , I.A. Adeyinka , A.A. Sekoni and F.O. Abeke
  Records obtained from 4336 pullets progeny for strain A and 4843 pullets, progeny for strain B under selection for part-period egg production to 280 days of age were used for this study. The response variables measured were Age at sexual maturity (ASM), Egg number to 280 days (EGG280 D), Egg weight average (EWTAV) and Body weight at 40 weeks of age (BWT40). The genotypic response was only 0.42 eggs per generation in the male line. The female line population showed a much higher positive response to selection, the phenotypic value being 1.67 eggs per generation while the genotypic response was 3.1 eggs per generation. The genetic correlation estimates between the different economic traits ranged from -0.70± 0.38 to 0.82 ± 0.42 vs -0.71 ± 0.47 to 0.76 ± 0.29 for the male and female lines respectively. The correlation between egg number and egg weight was small non significant. ASM was highly and negatively correlated with egg production to 280 days in both lines being higher than- 0.60 in most cases. The genetic correlation between egg number and BWT40 showed no definite trend. In the female line, correlated response in age ASM and BWT40 had negative values. In the male line however except for BWT40 which showed a positive correlated response of 3.4g/year, all other traits showed negative correlated responses. Generally it was evident that selection was more effective in improving the egg number in the female line than in the male line showing an increase of 1.67 vs 0.19 eggs per year in the female and male lines, respectively. The low egg number reported was as a result of the delay in sexual maturity especially during the later years of the selection experiment. Another factor that may have contributed to the variable response achieved from generation to generation may also be due to varying season of hatching across generation. However the positive response in the female line population may be attributed to reduced age at sexual maturity.
 
 
 
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