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Articles by B. Srinivasan
Total Records ( 2 ) for B. Srinivasan
  N. Aujla , M. J. Davies , T. C. Skinner , L. J. Gray , D. R. Webb , B. Srinivasan and K. Khunti
  Aim  To investigate associations between anxiety and measures of glycaemia in a White European and South Asian population attending community-based diabetes screening.

Methods  In total, 4688 White European and 1353 South Asian participants (aged 40-75 years) without a previous diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes underwent an oral glucose tolerance test and HbA1c measurement, detailed history, anthropometric measurements and completed the short-form Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory.

Results  Anxiety was significantly higher in South Asian participants (mean 34.1; sd 0.37) compared with White European participants (mean 29.8; sd 0.13). Significant correlations were not identified between anxiety and fasting (r = −0.01, P = 0.75), 2-h glucose (r = −0.10, P = 0.24) or HbA1c (r = 0.01, P = 0.40).

Conclusions  Anxiety levels at screening were greater among South Asian people. Fasting, 2-h plasma glucose and HbA1c are not affected by anxiety during screening tests for diabetes. Current and proposed screening methods for diagnosis of diabetes are not affected by anxiety at screening.

  K. Khunti , N. Taub , D. Webb , B. Srinivasan , J. Stockman , S. J. Griffin , R. K. Simmons and M. J. Davies
  Aims  To investigate validity of waist circumference measurements obtained by self-report and self-measurement with non-verbal pictorial instructions among a multi-ethnic population.

Methods  Five hundred and twenty-six individuals aged 40-75 years (91 South Asian, 430 White European and five other), who attended a screening programme for Type 2 diabetes, estimated their waist circumference and measured their waist with a paper tape measure. Participants were also provided with simple pictorial instructions for measurement of waist circumference in their preferred language and remeasured their waist circumference. We calculated 95% limits of agreement with measures undertaken by a healthcare professional unaware of prior measures.

Results  Mean age was 56.8 years (sd 9.0), mean BMI 30.0 kg/m2 (sd 5.6) and mean waist circumference 98.4 cm (sd 14.1). Seventy-nine per cent had high waist circumference according to International Diabetes Federation criteria. The mean of participants' self-reported value was 6.8 cm lower than the healthcare professional measure (sd 8.8; 95% limits of agreement -10.4 to 24.0 cm), with significant differences by sex and ethnicity (South Asian men 7.5 cm, South Asian women 0.1 cm, White European men 7.8 cm, White European women 7.0 cm, P < 0.001). Compared with healthcare professional measures, mean self-measured waist circumference was very similar, both with instructions (0.4 cm higher; sd 5.5 cm; -11.1 to 10.4 cm) and without instructions (0.5 cm lower; sd 5.6; -10.4 to 11.4 cm), but with significant differences by sex and ethnicity (P < 0.001).

Conclusions  There was systematic underestimation of self-reported waist circumference in this multi-ethnic UK population. The magnitude of underestimation might reduce the performance of risk scores; however, this can be corrected through self-measurement with pictorial instructions.

 
 
 
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