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Articles by B Fontaine
Total Records ( 3 ) for B Fontaine
  C Goizet , A Boukhris , A Durr , C Beetz , J Truchetto , C Tesson , M Tsaousidou , S Forlani , L Guyant Marechal , B Fontaine , J Guimaraes , B Isidor , O Chazouilleres , D Wendum , D Grid , F Chevy , P. F Chinnery , P Coutinho , J. P Azulay , I Feki , F Mochel , C Wolf , C Mhiri , A Crosby , A Brice and G. Stevanin
 

Thirty-four different loci for hereditary spastic paraplegias have been mapped, and 16 responsible genes have been identified. Autosomal recessive forms of spastic paraplegias usually have clinically complex phenotypes but the SPG5, SPG24 and SPG28 loci are considered to be associated with ‘pure’ forms of the disease. Very recently, five mutations in the CYP7B1 gene, encoding a cytochrome P450 oxysterol 7- hydroxylase and expressed in brain and liver, have been found in SPG5 families. We analysed the coding region and exon–intron boundaries of the CYP7B1 gene by direct sequencing in a series of 82 unrelated autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia index patients, manifesting either a pure (n = 52) or a complex form (n = 30) of the disease, and in 90 unrelated index patients with sporadic pure hereditary spastic paraplegia. We identified eight, including six novel, mutations in CYP7B1 segregating in nine families. Three of these mutations were nonsense (p.R63X, p.R112X, p.Y275X) and five were missense mutations (p.T297A, p.R417H, p.R417C, p.F470I, p.R486C), the last four clustering in exon 6 at the C-terminal end of the protein. Residue R417 appeared as a mutational hot-spot. The mean age at onset in 16 patients was 16.4 ± 12.1 years (range 4–47 years). After a mean disease duration of 28.3 ± 13.4 years (10–58), spasticity and functional handicap were moderate to severe in all cases. Interestingly, hereditary spastic paraplegia was pure in seven SPG5 families but complex in two. In addition, white matter hyperintensities were observed on brain magnetic resonance imaging in three patients issued from two of the seven pure families. Lastly, the index case of one family had a chronic autoimmune hepatitis while his eldest brother died from cirrhosis and liver failure. Whether this association is fortuitous remains unsolved, however. The frequency of CYP7B1 mutations were 7.3% (n = 6/82) in our series of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia families and 3.3% (n = 3/90) in our series of sporadic pure spastic paraplegia. The recent identification of CYP7B1 as the gene responsible for SPG5 highlights a novel molecular mechanism involved in hereditary spastic paraplegia determinism.

  E Matthews , D Fialho , S. V Tan , S. L Venance , S. C Cannon , D Sternberg , B Fontaine , A. A Amato , R. J Barohn , R. C Griggs , M. G Hanna and the CINCH Investigators
 

The non-dystrophic myotonias are an important group of skeletal muscle channelopathies electrophysiologically characterized by altered membrane excitability. Many distinct clinical phenotypes are now recognized and range in severity from severe neonatal myotonia with respiratory compromise through to milder late-onset myotonic muscle stiffness. Specific genetic mutations in the major skeletal muscle voltage gated chloride channel gene and in the voltage gated sodium channel gene are causative in most patients. Recent work has allowed more precise correlations between the genotype and the electrophysiological and clinical phenotype. The majority of patients with myotonia have either a primary or secondary loss of membrane chloride conductance predicted to result in reduction of the resting membrane potential. Causative mutations in the sodium channel gene result in an abnormal gain of sodium channel function that may show marked temperature dependence. Despite significant advances in the clinical, genetic and molecular pathophysiological understanding of these disorders, which we review here, there are important unresolved issues we address: (i) recent work suggests that specialized clinical neurophysiology can identify channel specific patterns and aid genetic diagnosis in many cases however, it is not yet clear if such techniques can be refined to predict the causative gene in all cases or even predict the precise genotype; (ii) although clinical experience indicates these patients can have significant progressive morbidity, the detailed natural history and determinants of morbidity have not been specifically studied in a prospective fashion; (iii) some patients develop myopathy, but its frequency, severity and possible response to treatment remains undetermined, furthermore, the pathophysiogical link between ion channel dysfunction and muscle degeneration is unknown; (iv) there is currently insufficient clinical trial evidence to recommend a standard treatment. Limited data suggest that sodium channel blocking agents have some efficacy. However, establishing the effectiveness of a therapy requires completion of multi-centre randomized controlled trials employing accurate outcome measures including reliable quantitation of myotonia. More specific pharmacological approaches are required and could include those which might preferentially reduce persistent muscle sodium currents or enhance the conductance of mutant chloride channels. Alternative strategies may be directed at preventing premature mutant channel degradation or correcting the mis-targeting of the mutant channels.

  S Sacconi , D Simkin , N Arrighi , F Chapon , M. M Larroque , S Vicart , D Sternberg , B Fontaine , J Barhanin , C Desnuelle and S. Bendahhou
 

Andersen's syndrome is a rare disorder that has been defined with a triad: periodic paralysis, cardiac arrhythmia, and development anomalies. Muscle weakness has been reported in two-thirds of the patients. KCNJ2 remains the only gene linked to Andersen's syndrome; this gene encodes for the -subunit of the strong inward-rectifier K+ channel Kir2.1. Several studies have shown that Andersen's syndrome mutations lead to a loss of function of the K+ channel activity in vitro. However, ex vivo studies on isolated patient muscle tissue have not been reported. We have performed muscle biopsies of controls and patients presenting with clinically and genetically defined Andersen's syndrome disorder. Myoblasts were cultured and characterized morphologically and functionally using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. No morphological difference was observed between Andersen's syndrome and control myoblasts at each passage of the cell culture. Cellular proliferation and viability were quantified in parallel with direct cell counts and showed no difference between control and Andersen's syndrome patients. Moreover, our data show no significant difference in myoblast fusion index among Andersen's syndrome and control patients. Current recordings carried out on myotubes revealed the absence of an inwardly rectifying Ba2+-sensitive current in affected patient cells. One consequence of the Ik1 current loss in Andersen's syndrome myotubes is a shift of the resting membrane potential toward depolarizing potentials. Our data describe for the first time the functional consequences of Andersen's syndrome mutations ex vivo and provide clues to the K+ channel pathophysiology in skeletal muscle.

 
 
 
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