Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by Ara S. Khachaturian
Total Records ( 12 ) for Ara S. Khachaturian
  Zaven S. Khachaturian and Ara S. Khachaturian
  Not Available
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Jordi Cami , Sandrine Andrieu , Jesus Avila , Merce Boada Rovira , Monique Breteler , Lutz Froelich , Serge Gauthier , Teresa Gomez- Isla , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Eric B. Larson , Oscar L. Lopez , Jose Manuel Martinez- Lage , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard D. Schellenberg , Jordi Sunyer , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  In recognition of the global problem posed by Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, an international think-tank meeting was convened by Biocat, the Pasqual Maragall Foundation, and the Lou Ruvo Brain Institute in February 2009. The meeting initiated the planning of a European Union-North American collaborative research enterprise to expedite the delay and ultimate prevention of dementing disorders. The key aim is to build parallel and complementary research infrastructure that will support international standardization and inter-operability among researchers in both continents. The meeting identified major challenges, opportunities for research resources and support, integration with ongoing efforts, and identification of key domains to influence the design and administration of the enterprise.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Deborah Barnes , Richard Einstein , Sterling Johnson , Virginia Lee , Allen Roses , Mark A. Sager , William R. Shankle , Peter J. Snyder , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard Schellenberg , John Trojanowski , Paul Aisen , Marilyn S. Albert , John C.S. Breitner , Neil Buckholtz , Maria Carrillo , Steven Ferris , Barry D. Greenberg , Michael Grundman , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Oscar L. Lopez , Paul Maruff , Richard C. Mohs , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Creighton Phelps , Eric Reiman , Marwan Sabbagh , Mary Sano , Lon S. Schneider , Eric Siemers , Pierre Tariot , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  Among the major impediments to the design of clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most critical is the lack of validated biomarkers, assessment tools, and algorithms that would facilitate identification of asymptomatic individuals with elevated risk who might be recruited as study volunteers. Thus, the Leon Thal Symposium 2009 (LTS'09), on October 27–28, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada, was convened to explore strategies to surmount the barriers in designing a multisite, comparative study to evaluate and validate various approaches for detecting and selecting asymptomatic people at risk for cognitive disorders/dementia. The deliberations of LTS'09 included presentations and reviews of different approaches (algorithms, biomarkers, or measures) for identifying asymptomatic individuals at elevated risk for AD who would be candidates for longitudinal or prevention studies. The key nested recommendations of LTS'09 included: (1) establishment of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies as a shared research core resource; (2) launch of a large collaborative study that will compare multiple screening approaches and biomarkers to determine the best method for identifying asymptomatic people at risk for AD; (3) initiation of a Global Database that extends the concept of the National Database for Longitudinal Studies for longitudinal studies beyond the United States; and (4) development of an educational campaign that will address public misconceptions about AD and promote healthy brain aging.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Ronald C. Petersen , Peter J. Snyder , Ara S. Khachaturian , Paul Aisen , Mony de Leon , Barry D. Greenberg , Walter Kukull , Paul Maruff , Reisa A. Sperling , Yaakov Stern , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas , Sandrine Andrieu , Michael W. Weiner , Maria C. Carrillo and Lisa J. Bain
  The fourth Leon Thal Symposium (LTS2010) was convened in Toulouse, France, on November 3, 2010. This symposium reviewed design parameters that are necessary to develop comprehensive national databases on healthy aging. Such datasets offer the potential to serve as the foundation for a systems-approach to solve the dual public health problems of: (1) early detection of people who are at elevated risk for Alzheimer‘s disease, and (2) the development of interventions to delay onset of, or prevent, late-life dementia. The symposium considered three interrelated components of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies on Healthy Aging as follows: (a) a registry of healthy aging adults; (b) refined computer-based assessments for data gathering, including assessments of behavioral/memory changes associated with aging that are appropriate for broad use in nonexpert settings; and (c) high performance computing/supercomputer-based approaches for health data modeling and mining
  Rachelle S. Doody , Patricia E. Cole , David S. Miller , Eric Siemers , Ronald Black , Howard Feldman , Rachel Schindler , Stephen Graham , Theresa Heath , Ara S. Khachaturian , Rebecca Evans and Maria C. Carrillo
  The number of clinical trials for Alzheimer‘s disease conducted outside the United States in a broad array of countries is increasing. As the number of compounds ready for clinical testing increases, and as trials become longer and more complex, this trend is expected to grow. The cultural and ethical context of global clinical trials, potential benefits for those involved, and practical approaches to obstacles generated by these global trials were discussed at a meeting of the Alzheimer‘s Association Research Roundtable. Regulatory issues, including regional differences in study registration procedures, rules for collecting and reporting serious adverse events, requirements for national identity of study populations, and regulatory audits were also discussed by individuals who are knowledgeable about global clinical trials for Alzheimer‘s disease.
  Peter J. Snyder , Colleen E. Jackson , Ronald C. Petersen , Ara S. Khachaturian , Jeffrey Kaye , Marilyn S. Albert and Sandra Weintraub
  The demand for rapidly administered, sensitive, and reliable cognitive assessments that are specifically designed for identifying individuals in the earliest stages of cognitive decline (and to measure subtle change over time) has escalated as the emphasis in Alzheimer‘s disease clinical research has shifted from clinical diagnosis and treatment toward the goal of developing presymptomatic neuroprotective therapies. To meet these changing clinical requirements, cognitive measures or tailored batteries of tests must be validated and determined to be fit-for-use for the discrimination between cognitively healthy individuals and persons who are experiencing very subtle cognitive changes that likely signal the emergence of early mild cognitive impairment. We sought to collect and review data systematically from a wide variety of (mostly computer-administered) cognitive measures, all of which are currently marketed or distributed with the claims that these instruments are sensitive and reliable for the early identification of disease or, if untested for this purpose, are promising tools based on other variables. The survey responses for 16 measures/batteries are presented in brief in this review; full survey responses and summary tables are archived and publicly available on the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer‘s Disease by 2020 Web site (http://pad2020.org). A decision tree diagram highlighting critical decision points for selecting measures to meet varying clinical trials requirements has also been provided. Ultimately, the survey questionnaire, framework, and decision guidelines provided in this review should remain as useful aids for the evaluation of any new or updated sets of instruments in the years to come.
  Constantine G. Lyketsos , Maria C. Carrillo , J. Michael Ryan , Ara S. Khachaturian , Paula Trzepacz , Joan Amatniek , Jesse Cedarbaum , Robert Brashear and David S. Miller
  Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are core features of Alzheimer‘s disease and related dementias. Once thought to emerge primarily in people with late-stage disease, these symptoms are currently known to manifest commonly in very early disease and in prodromal phases, such as mild cognitive impairment. Despite decades of research, reliable treatments for dementia-associated NPS have not been found, and those that are in widespread use present notable risks for people using these medications. An Alzheimer‘s Association Research Roundtable was convened in the spring of 2010 to review what is known about NPS in Alzheimer‘s disease, to discuss classification and underlying neuropathogenesis and vulnerabilities, and to formulate recommendations for new approaches to tailored therapeutics.
  Kyra Rosow , Andrew Holzapfel , Jason H. Karlawish , Matthew Baumgart , Lisa J. Bain and Ara S. Khachaturian
  As the world‘s population ages, countries must prepare for the significant impact Alzheimer‘s disease will have on their health systems, their economies, and their citizens. In anticipation of major global demographic changes, many countries in the G-20 since 2000 have begun to develop and enact plans to address Alzheime‘s disease as a national priority. However, even with nearly half of these participating countries having plans in place, there has been little research done to quantify the value of enacting a countrywide plan on this disease. In this review, we summarize recent national plans (from the year 2000 and beyond) and any results stemming from their respective recommendations and activities.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Ara S. Khachaturian and William Thies
  This perspective updates the status of the ”National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease“ and the recommendations of the NAPA Advisory Council's Sub–committee on Research. Here, we identify some of the critical issues the future reiterations of the National Plan should consider during implementation phase of the plan. The Journal invites the scientific community to contribute additional ideas and suggestions towards a national research initiative.
  Kristine Yaffe , Michael Tocco , Ronald C. Petersen , Catherine Sigler , Leah C. Burns , Christel Cornelius , Ara S. Khachaturian , Michael C. Irizarry and Maria C. Carrillo
  Epidemiological studies increasingly inform Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) public health impact, prevention strategies, drug targets, therapeutic interventions, and clinical trial design. For this reason, the Alzheimer‘s Association Research Roundtable convened an international group of AD experts with experience in conducting both observational and clinical trials for a meeting on October 19 and 20, 2010, in Washington, DC, to discuss the role of epidemiologic studies in AD research and therapeutic advances. Topics included wellness markers and risk factors, with a focus on special populations such as those at elevated risk, super agers, and underserved populations. Discussions also highlighted lessons learned from observational studies of aging, cardiovascular disease, and other disease areas, as well as how new technologies have enabled the gathering of data relevant to drug development and clinical trial conduct.
  Mary D. Naylor , Jason H. Karlawish , Steven E. Arnold , Ara S. Khachaturian , Zaven S. Khachaturian , Virginia M.-Y. Lee , Matthew Baumgart , Sube Banerjee , Cornelia Beck , Kaj Blennow , Ron Brookmeyer , Kurt R. Brunden , Kathleen C. Buckwalter , Meryl Comer , Kenneth Covinsky , Lynn Friss Feinberg , Giovanni Frisoni , Colin Green , Renato Maia Guimaraes , Lisa P. Gwyther , Franz F. Hefti , Michael Hutton , Claudia Kawas , David M. Kent , Lewis Kuller , Kenneth M. Langa , Robert W. Mahley , Katie Maslow , Colin L. Masters , Diane E. Meier , Peter J. Neumann , Steven M. Paul , Ronald C. Petersen , Mark A. Sager , Mary Sano , Dale Schenk , Holly Soares , Reisa A. Sperling , Sidney M. Stahl , Vivianna van Deerlin , Yaakov Stern , David Weir , David A. Wolk and John Q. Trojanowski
  To address the pending public health crisis due to Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative disorders, the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Program at the University of Pennsylvania held a meeting entitled "State of the Science Conference on the Advancement of Alzheimer's Diagnosis, Treatment and Care," on June 21-22, 2012. The meeting comprised four workgroups focusing on Biomarkers; Clinical Care and Health Services Research; Drug Development; and Health Economics, Policy, and Ethics. The workgroups shared, discussed, and compiled an integrated set of priorities, recommendations, and action plans, which are presented in this article.
  Maria C. Carrillo , H. Robert Brashear , Veronika Logovinsky , J. Michael Ryan , Howard H. Feldman , Eric R. Siemers , Susan Abushakra , Dean M. Hartley , Ronald C. Petersen , Ara S. Khachaturian and Reisa A. Sperling
  Current research including the basic biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) provides a foundation to explore whether our current state of knowledge is sufficient to initiate prevention studies and allow us to believe prevention of AD is possible. Current research and recently revised criteria for the diagnosis of AD by the National Institutes on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association suggest a continuum of disease from preclinical asymptomatic to symptomatic Alzheimer's dementia. In light of these revised criteria, the possibility of secondary prevention and even primary prevention is under discussion. The Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable convened a meeting to discuss the rationale and feasibility of conducting secondary prevention trials in AD.
 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility