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Articles by Amani W. Youssef
Total Records ( 8 ) for Amani W. Youssef
  H.M.A. Hassan , M.M. El-Moniary , Y. Hamouda , Eman F. El-Daly , Amani W. Youssef and Nafisa A. Abd El-Azeem
  A growth experiment was conducted to study productive performance, carcass characteristics and some blood parameters of broiler chicks fed corn-soybean meal diets with 3 levels of Moringa oleifera leaves meal (MOLM) under heat stress conditions. Two hundred and eighty one day old chicks were randomly assigned to four treatments. The 1st treatment fed a commercial basal diet as a control, while, the other treatments 2, 3 and 4 were fed the commercial basal diet supplemented with MOLM (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3%, respectively). The results showed that body weight gain was increased significantly (p<0.05) as the level of MOLM increase; also, the feed intake had the same trend. Feed conversion ratio was recorded better values as the level of MOLM increase. The levels of MOLM had no significant effect on carcass relative weight, liver, gizzard, heart, abdominal fat, breast and thigh. Haemoglobin (Hb) was increased with increase the level of MOLM, while, haematocrit (Ht) values did not affect. Heterophil/Lymphocyte (H/L) ratio was decreased by increase the level of MOLM. Plasma total protein increased significantly (p<0.05) with increase the level of MOLM. Albumin did not affect while, globulin increased significantly (p<0.05) with increase the level of MOLM. AST decreased significantly (p<0.05) while, ALT did not affect with adding MOLM levels. Thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) were significantly (p<0.05) increased with increase MOLM level while, T3/T4 ratio did not affect. It could be concluded that addition of Moringa oleifera leaves meal up to 0.3% improved broiler performance, physiological parameters and enhanced the ability to resist heat stress conditions of broilers fed corn-soybean meal diet.
  Amani W. Youssef , H.M.A. Hassan , H.M. Ali and M.A. Mohamed
  This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of various commercial feed additives on performance and egg quality of laying hens. These additives included probiotics (Protexin® and Clostat®), symbiotic (Diamond®) and organic acids (Galliacid®). A number of 180 HL Brown hens (27 wks of age) were divided into 5 treatment groups (6 replicates of 6 birds, each). Groups were assigned to 5 experimental diets: a basal diet of no additive (control), the basal diet supplemented with either 0.01% Protexin®, 0.05% Clostat®, 0.06% Diamond® or 0.06% Galliacid®. Data of layer performance and egg quality were obtained during 12 weeks experimental period. Supplementation of probiotics or symbiotic recorded higher (p>0.05) egg production than the control but organic acids supplementation significantly (p<0.05) increased egg production by 9.94%. Egg weight slightly improved (p>0.05) by dietary treatments. Supplementation of probiotics, symbiotic and organic acids significantly (p<0.01) increased egg mass. The best egg mass value was recorded for birds fed diet supplemented with organic acids. Feed conversion ratio improved (p>0.05) by dietary treatments. Adding probiotics, symbiotic or organic acids did not significantly affect shape index, yolk index, yolk %, SWUSA, Haugh unit or specific gravity. Addition of probiotics or organic acids showed significant (p<0.05) increase in shell thickness and yolk color. It could be concluded that these additives caused improvement in performance and egg quality of laying hen. More studies are needed to explain the effects of different sources and levels of these additives on performance and egg quality of laying hens.
  H.M.A. Hassan , Amani W. Youssef , Eman F. El- Daly , Nafisa A. Abd El- Azeem , Eman R. Hassan and M.A. Mohamed
  An experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of using three different commercial preparations of Direct-Fed Microbials (DFM) being: A mixture of Enterococcus faecium (Protexin®, DFM1), a mixture of Bacillus subtilis (Clostat®, DFM2) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells with its fermentation metabolites (Diamond®, DFM3) on performance, carcass characteristics, caecum bacterial count and changes on ileum histology of broilers. A number of 200 Cobb 500 broiler chicks were fed on 4 dietary treatments from 10-36 days of age: Abasal corn-soybean meal diet served as a control treatment with no supplements or supplemented with the recommended levels of the tested products. No significant differences were detected on Body Weight Gain (BWG) among treatments. Chicks fed the control diet consumed more (p<0.05) feed than those fed DFM supplemented diets. No significant differences on Feed Intake (FI) were observed among birds fed the different examined DFM. Birds fed the control diet recorded the worst values (p<0.01) of Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) among the dietary treatments. Addition of DFM to broiler diets improved efficiency of feed utilization (FCR values) by about 6%. Addition of DFM to broiler diets decreased Escherichia coli and Clostridium spp. count in the ceacum. Also, feeding DFM supplemented diets stimulated histological changes in the ileum villi (height and width along with the number of crypts). These changes reflected a positive effect of the tested products on intestinal efficiency which may explain the improvement in FCR of broilers. It could be concluded that birds fed DFM supplemented diets utilized feed more efficiently than those fed the control diet. The DFM that contain Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus subtilis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells with its fermentation metabolites, exert the same effects upon the studied parameters.
  M.A. Mohamed , Eman F. El- Daly , Nafisa A. Abd El- Azeem , Amani W. Youssef and H.M.A. Hassan
  An experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of using organic acids as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoter on performance of broiler chicks. Carcass characteristics, histological changes of ileum and immune related organs (bursa, thymus and spleen) along with intestinal bacteria count were also studied. A number of 150 Cobb broiler chicks were fed on three dietary treatments: a basal corn-soybean meal diet served as a control treatment with no supplements or supplemented with either 0.025% Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylat (BMD, antibiotic) or 0.06% Galliacid® (organic acids) from 10 to 36 days of age. The results showed that birds fed antibiotic or organic acids gained significant (p<0.05) more body weight than those fed the control diet. No significant differences were detected among treatments on feed intake while feed conversion ratio (FCR) values were significantly (p<0.001) differ. Addition of organic acids or antibiotic did improve FCR by about 9 and 4%, respectively. These results indicated that birds fed either organic acids or antibiotic supplemented diets utilized feed more efficiently than those fed the control diet. Carcass characteristics were not affected by dietary treatments, while the addition of antibiotic or organic acids significantly (p<0.01) increased spleen and bursa weight (% live body weight). Addition of organic acids was more effective than antibiotic on decreasing intestinal count of Escherichia coli and appearance of Colostridium perfringers. Organic acids as alternative to the antibiotic growth promoter have stimulated some histological change in histology of the villi and the immune related organs. Performance and feed efficiency are closely interrelated with the quantitative microbial load of the gut, the morphological structure of the intestinal wall and the activity of the immune system. In conclusion, dietary inclusion of organic acids increased growth performance and improved intestinal health and morphology of broiler chicks. It could be successfully used as alternative to antibiotic growth promoters in broiler diets or as a tool of controlling intestinal pathogenic bacteria.
  Nafisa A. Abd El-Azeem , Eman F. El-Daly , H.M.A. Hassan , Amani W. Youssef and M.A. Mohamed
  An experiment was conducted to study the effect of feeding different commercial preparations of direct-fed microbials (DFM) used as growth promoters on weight and histology of immune related organs (bursa, thymus and spleen) in broilers. Two hundred unsexed 10 days old Cobb broiler chicks were individually weighed and divided into 4 groups (5 replicates of 10 chicks, each) and fed 4 different experimental diets. A mixture of Enterococcus faecium (Protexin®, DFM1), a mixture of Bacillus subtilis (Clostat®, DFM2) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells with its fermentation metabolites (Diamond®, DFM3) were supplemented to broiler diets and compared with the basal diet which served as control. Bursa, thymus and spleen were taken from birds at 36 days of age. The results showed significant (P<0.01) increase in spleen and bursa weight (relative to live body weight) in birds fed DFM supplemented diets compared with those fed the control diet of no supplement. Addition of DFM enhanced the activity of bursal follicles and may improve the bursa activity and caused improvement in thymus and spleen structure compared with the control. In conclusion, DFM supplemental levels have stimulated some histological change in the immune related organs which may result in improvement of chick immunity.
  M.A. Mohamed , H.M.A. Hassan , Amani W. Youssef and Sawsan M. Gad
  Growth experiment was carried out to examine the effect of feeding broilers on finisher diet (23 to 39 days of age) contained low levels of trace mineral premix. Two hundred male Ross broiler chicks were divided into four treatment groups, five replicates each. Four corn-soybean finisher diets were formulated to cover all the nutrient requirement and the trace mineral premix (TMP) was added at 100, 75, 50 or 25% of the recommended level. Performance, carcass characteristics, tibia ash, mineral excretion and economic efficiency were measured. The results showed that reducing trace mineral content in finisher diets did not affect chick performance (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in body weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio. Also, carcass characteristics and tibia ash content did not significantly affect by lowering level of dietary TMP. Mineral excretion significantly (p<0.05) decreased with reduced trace mineral levels. Economic efficiency slightly improved with reducing dietary trace mineral content. It could be demonstrated that it is possible to reduce level of dietary TMP in finisher broiler diets with no adverse effects on performance, carcass characteristics or tibia ash content. It could help not only to maintain general performance, but also to reduce any potential environmental pollution for sustainable poultry production.
  H.M.A. Hassan , A. Samy , Amani W. Youssef and M.A. Mohamed
  Background and Objective: Several feed additives have been used to improve feed efficiency and growth performance of broiler. This growth experiment aimed to study the effect of using different feed additives compared to Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate antibiotic growth promoter on growth performance and carcass traits. Methodology: Three hundred broiler chicks were divided into six treatment groups (5 replicates, 10 birds each treatment). A basal corn-soybean meal diet was formulated. Treatment 1 was basal diet without additives (as a control group); treatments 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were the control diet supplemented with 0.025% Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate (antibiotic), 0.05% Saltose (probiotic), 0.05% Clostat (probiotic), 0.05% Clostri-stop (probiotic) or 0.1% Sangrovit (phytobiotic), respectively. Results: The results showed that supplementation of different feed additives or antibiotic significantly (p<0.001) improved body weight gain (BWG) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) in the finisher period (from 26-35 days of age) and the overall period (1-35 days) compared with the control (without additives). Results of carcass traits showed that there was a significant (p<0.05) increase in carcass weight and dressing percentage of broilers fed antibiotic or feed additives supplemented diets compared to those fed the control diet. However, internal organs were not affected by supplementation. Conclusion: Using probiotics or phytobiotics in broiler diet as feed additives appeared to be superior compared to antibiotic growth promoter. It could be concluded that, addition of feed additives containing Bacillus sp., Clostridium butyricum (probiotics) or Sanguinarine (phytobiotics) to broiler diets could significantly improve growth performance and carcass traits more efficiently and safely than antibiotic growth promoter. These could be good alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters in broiler diets.
  Mosaad M. El-Moniary , Ahmed Goud , Yasser Hamouda , Amani W. Youssef and Hussein M.A. Hassan
  Objective: This study was designed to determine the effects of early heat conditioning and betaine or ammonium chloride supplementation on growth performance and physiological parameters of quail chicks in hot climate. Materials and Methods: A total of 600-one day old quail chicks were divided into two groups, the first served as a control (non-conditioning) and the second exposed to early age heat condition (40±1ºC for 24 h at the 5th day of age). Then each group were divided into three subgroups, the first was fed the basal diet and served as a control, the second was fed the basal diet supplemented with betaine (1.5 g kg–1) and the third was fed the basal diet supplemented with ammonium chloride (0.5 g kg–1). Results: The results at 40 day of age showed that early heat conditioning with or without addition significantly (p<0.05) improved body weight and feed conversion ratio. The best improvement on performance was recorded for birds exposed to early heat conditioning and fed betaine or ammonium chloride supplemented diet. Addition of either betaine or ammonium chloride to quail diets resulted in a significant (p<0.05) improvement of blood measurements. Exposing quail to early heat conditioning resulted in a significant improvement of total plasma proteins, plasma globulin and the level of thyroid hormones. Addition of either betaine or ammonium chloride has improved level of plasma protein fractions and antioxidant status compared to the control. Conclusion: It could be concluded that using early heat conditioning coupled with betaine or ammonium chloride supplementation gave more beneficial effects on performance and blood parameters.
 
 
 
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