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Articles by A.N. Robert
Total Records ( 1 ) for A.N. Robert
  A.N. Robert , A.A. Ayuk , P.O. Ozung and B. J. Harry
  Objective: This study evaluated the effect of processed unripe plantain peel meal (UPPM) based-diets on the growth performance, nutrient digestibility and cost of production of weaned rabbits. Materials and Methods: Twenty five weaned rabbits of both sexes with an average initial weight of 670.60±2.71 g rabbit1 were used. The rabbits were assigned to five experimental diets in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD). The diets were formulated using various processed forms of UPPM (sun-dried, toasted, fermented and urea-treated) to replace maize at 50% level each for T2, T3, T4 and T5, respectively. The control diet (T1) contained 100% maize without UPPM. Data on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and production cost were determined and analysed using one-way ANOVA. Results: The results showed that final body weight, total feed intake, total weight gain and feed conversion ratio in the treatment groups were significantly (p<0.05) lower than corresponding values in the control treatment. The fermented UPPM showed significantly (p<0.05) higher digestible dry matter, crude protein and crude fibre than other diets. The cost of feed was the highest in T1(103.89) and least in T2 ( 85.10) but the cost per kilogram weight gain was least in T4 (450.10) and highest in T1 (475.05). Although, the control diet performed better in terms of final body weight and total weight gain, it was however cheaper to produce 1kg of meat with the fermented UPPM. Conclusion: The study concluded that replacing maize at 50% with fermented UPPM could enhance growth performance and nutrient digestibility without compromising economic gain in rabbit production.
 
 
 
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