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Articles by A.F. Islam
Total Records ( 2 ) for A.F. Islam
  M.A. Hossain , A.F. Islam and P.A. Iji
  This study was undertaken to investigate the growth performance and energy utilization of broiler chickens fed on conventional diets, based on soybean or canola, with fishmeal (SBM50 and Can50, respectively) or on Vegetable Protein (VP) diets without fishmeal (SBM75 and Can75). Feed intake was highest (p<0.001) on the SBM50 and Can50 diets and lowest on SBM75 diet. Birds in the SBM50 and Can50 diet groups were heavier (p<0.001) than the SBM75 and Can75 diet groups. Birds on SBM50 and Can50 diets achieved superior Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR), while birds on Can75 diet were the poorest. Mortality of birds was unaffected (p>0.05) between dietary groups. The Apparent Metabolizable Energy (AME) intake on the SBM50 and Can50 diets was higher (p<0.001) than in the VP. Fat intake was highest (p<0.001) on Can50 diet group while protein intake was unaffected by treatment. Heat Production (HP) was identical, but net energy of production (NEp) was improved (p<0.05) in the birds on SBM50 and Can50. Whole body energy as well as fat (p<0.05) and protein contents were also increased (p<0.01) in the SBM50 and Can50 dietary groups. Birds on SBM50 and Can50 diet groups retained higher energy as fat (REf) (p<0.05) and as protein (REp) (p<0.01). The efficiencies of utilization of ME for energy (kRE), protein (kREp) and fat (kREf) retentions were unaffected. The results demonstrated that birds on the conventional diets (SBM50; Can 50) utilized energy better and as such grew faster than the birds on VP (SBM75; Can75) diets.
  M.A. Hossain , A.F. Islam and P.A. Iji
  A study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary protein sources and microbial enzyme supplementation on amino acid and mineral digestibility, tissue protein contents and endogenous enzyme activities of broiler chickens. Ross 308 day-old male broiler chicks (n = 160) were assigned randomly to four dietary treatments, each replicated five times, eight chicks per replicate, in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Two basal diets were formulated with soybean (SBM) and canola (CM) meals at a ratio of 75:25, respectively, along with basal grains and fed to the birds as such or supplemented with enzymes from 1 to 35 days. Enzymes had a positive effect on the gross responses (feed intake, body weight and feed conversion ratio) of the broiler chickens at 35 days. However, feed intake was significantly different (p<0.001) between protein sources but this did not affect (p>0.05) body weight and feed conversion ratio (FCR) between 1 and 35 days. Tissue protein contents and endogenous enzyme activities at 21 days (except for maltase) were unaffected by dietary sources and microbial enzyme supplementation. The activity of maltase was higher (p<0.05) on CM diets than on SBM diets, but this effect was absent when diets were supplemented with enzymes. The digestibility of threonine and lysine, measured at 35 days, was significantly (p<0.01) higher on SBM diets than on CM diets. Similarly the digestibility of valine, isoleucine and leucine was also higher (p<0.05) on SBM diet than in CM diet. Addition of enzymes also significantly (p<0.05) increased the digestibility of histidine, threonine, lysine and isoleucine, but not the digestibility of other amino acids measured at this period (35d). Enzymes had no effect (p>0.05) on mineral digestibility of broilers over the test period. The digestibility of Cu, Zn and Mg was increased (p<0.05) on CM diet, whereas Ca digestibility was higher on SBM diet at 35 days. It can be concluded that the improved growth of the birds might be a result of increased digestibility of amino acids and increase in feed consumption.
 
 
 
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