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Articles by A. Scott
Total Records ( 2 ) for A. Scott
  C. Kerry , S. Mitchell , S. Sharma , A. Scott and G. Rayman
 

Aim

To determine whether diurnal temporal variations in hypoglycaemic frequency occur in hospitalized patients.

Methods

Hypoglycaemic events were identified in a snapshot bedside audit of capillary blood glucose results from diabetes charts of all inpatients receiving insulin or a sulphonylurea (with or without insulin) on 2 days separated by 6 weeks. Additionally, capillary blood glucose measurements were remotely captured over 2 months, in the same category of patients, and analysed for temporal patterns. Hypoglycaemia was defined as ‘severe’ when the capillary blood glucose was < 3.0 mmol/l and ‘mild’ when the capillary blood glucose was between 3.0 and 3.9 mmol/l.

Results

The bedside audit found that 74% of those audited experienced a hypoglycaemia event. Eighty-three per cent of all hypoglycaemic events and 70% of severe events were recorded between 21.00 and 09.00 h. This was confirmed in the longer duration remote monitoring study where 70% of all hypoglycaemic events and 66% of severe events occurred between 21.00 and 09.00 h.

Conclusion

Hypoglycaemia occurs more frequently between 21.00 and 09.00 h in hospitalized patients receiving treatments that can cause hypoglycaemia. This may be related to insufficient carbohydrate intake during this period, and is potentially preventable by changes in catering practice.

  B. Johnson , J. Elliott , A. Scott , S. Heller and C. Eiser
 

Aim

To assess medical and psychological outcomes among young people with Type 1 diabetes and to compare medical outcomes with a previous audit.

Methods

An observational study in two diabetes clinics for young adults (aged 16-21 years) in Sheffield, UK. Young people (n = 96: 81.4% response rate) with Type 1 diabetes (diagnosed > 6 months) completed measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety and disordered eating and consented for their medical records to be consulted.

Results

Mean HbA1c (86 ± 23 mmol/mol; 10.0 ± 2.1%); was comparable with that reported previously and considerably higher than recommended (< 58 mmol/mol or 7.5%). Screening rates were improved and non-attendance was lower than previously reported, but levels of non-proliferative retinopathy have increased. Microvascular complications are present in 46.9% of those diagnosed more than 7 years. Elevated levels of disordered eating were reported by 35.1%. Those scoring above cut-off levels for clinical anxiety (26.6%) and depression (10.9%) are comparable with other work with young people with Type 1 diabetes.

Conclusions

Despite technological advances and improvements to delivery of care, HbA1c remain above recommended levels in a significant proportion of young people, many of whom already have microvascular complications. We need to learn from European centres who achieve better results, improve transition from paediatric care, integrate mental health support with diabetes care provision and take into account young people's views about clinic.

 
 
 
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