Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by A. Rosenzweig
Total Records ( 2 ) for A. Rosenzweig
  D. E Sosnovik , M Nahrendorf , P Panizzi , T Matsui , E Aikawa , G Dai , L Li , F Reynolds , G. W Dorn , R Weissleder , L Josephson and A. Rosenzweig
 

Background— The ability to image cardiomyocyte (CM) apoptosis in heart failure could facilitate more accurate diagnostics and optimize targeted therapeutics. We thus aimed to develop a platform to image CM apoptosis quantitatively and specifically in heart failure in vivo. The myocardium in heart failure, however, is characterized by very low levels of CM apoptosis and normal vascular permeability, factors thought to preclude the use of molecular MRI.

Methods and Results— Female mice with overexpression of Gaq were studied. Two weeks postpartum, these mice develop a cardiomyopathy characterized by low levels of CM apoptosis and minimal myocardial necrosis or inflammation. The mice were injected with the annexin-labeled nanoparticle (AnxCLIO-Cy5.5) or a control probe (CLIO-Cy5.5) and imaged in vivo at 9.4 T. Uptake of AnxCLIO-Cy5.5 occurred in isolated clusters, frequently in the subendocardium. Myocardial T2* was significantly lower (7.6±1.5 versus 16.8±2.7 ms, P<0.05) in the mice injected with AnxCLIO-Cy5.5 versus CLIO-Cy5.5, consistent with the uptake of AnxCLIO-Cy5.5 by apoptotic CMs. A strong correlation (r2=0.86, P<0.05) was seen between in vivo T2* (AnxCLIO-Cy5.5 uptake) and myocardial caspase-3 activity.

Conclusions— The ability of molecular MRI to image sparsely expressed targets in the myocardium is demonstrated in this study. Moreover, a novel platform for high-resolution and specific imaging of CM apoptosis in heart failure is established. In addition to providing novel insights into the pathogenesis of CM apoptosis, the developed platform could facilitate the development of novel antiapoptotic therapies in heart failure.

  M. R Morissette , S. A Cook , C Buranasombati , M. A Rosenberg and A. Rosenzweig
 

Myostatin is a highly conserved negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Loss of functional myostatin in cattle, mice, sheep, dogs, and humans results in increased muscle mass. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this increase in muscle growth are not fully understood. Previously, we have reported that phenylephrine-induced cardiac muscle growth and Akt activation are enhanced in myostatin knockout mice compared with controls. Here we report that skeletal muscle from myostatin knockout mice show increased Akt protein expression and overall activity at baseline secondary to an increase in Akt mRNA. We examined the functional role of myostatin modulation of Akt in C2C12 myotubes, a well-established in vitro model of skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Adenoviral overexpression of myostatin attenuated the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated increase in myotube diameter, as well as IGF-I-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of myostatin by overexpression of the NH2-terminal portion of myostatin was sufficient to increase myotube diameter and Akt phosphorylation. Coexpression of myostatin and constitutively active Akt (myr-Akt) restored the increase in myotube diameter. Conversely, expression of dominant negative Akt (dn-Akt) with the inhibitory myostatin propeptide blocked the increase in myotube diameter. Of note, ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation and atrogin-1/muscle atrophy F box mRNA were increased in skeletal muscle from myostain knockout mice. Together, these data suggest myostatin regulates muscle growth at least in part through regulation of Akt.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility