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Articles by A. S Andrew
Total Records ( 4 ) for A. S Andrew
  T Truong , W Sauter , J. D McKay , H. D Hosgood , C Gallagher , C. I Amos , M Spitz , J Muscat , P Lazarus , T Illig , H. E Wichmann , H Bickeboller , A Risch , H Dienemann , Z. F Zhang , B. P Naeim , P Yang , S Zienolddiny , A Haugen , L Le Marchand , Y. C Hong , J. H Kim , E. J Duell , A. S Andrew , C Kiyohara , H Shen , K Matsuo , T Suzuki , A Seow , D. P. K Ng , Q Lan , D Zaridze , N Szeszenia Dabrowska , J Lissowska , P Rudnai , E Fabianova , V Constantinescu , V Bencko , L Foretova , V Janout , N. E Caporaso , D Albanes , M Thun , M. T Landi , J Trubicka , M Lener , J Lubinski , Wang EPIC lung , A Chabrier , P Boffetta , P Brennan and R. J. Hung
 

Background. Analysis of candidate genes in individual studies has had only limited success in identifying particular gene variants that are conclusively associated with lung cancer risk. In the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), we conducted a coordinated genotyping study of 10 common variants selected because of their prior evidence of an association with lung cancer. These variants belonged to candidate genes from different cancer-related pathways including inflammation (IL1B), folate metabolism (MTHFR), regulatory function (AKAP9 and CAMKK1), cell adhesion (SEZL6) and apoptosis (FAS, FASL, TP53, TP53BP1 and BAT3). Methods. Genotype data from 15 ILCCO case–control studies were available for a total of 8431 lung cancer cases and 11 072 controls of European descent and Asian ethnic groups. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the association between each variant and lung cancer risk. Results. Only the association between a non-synonymous variant of TP53BP1 (rs560191) and lung cancer risk was significant (OR = 0.91, P = 0.002). This association was more striking for squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 0.86, P = 6 x 10–4). No heterogeneity by center, ethnicity, smoking status, age group or sex was observed. In order to confirm this association, we included results for this variant from a set of independent studies (9966 cases/11 722 controls) and we reported similar results. When combining all these studies together, we reported an overall OR = 0.93 (0.89–0.97) (P = 0.001). This association was significant only for squamous cell carcinoma [OR = 0.89 (0.85–0.95), P = 1 x 10–4]. Conclusion. This study suggests that rs560191 is associated to lung cancer risk and further highlights the value of consortia in replicating or refuting published genetic associations.

  D Baris , M. R Karagas , C Verrill , A Johnson , A. S Andrew , C. J Marsit , M Schwenn , J. S Colt , S Cherala , C Samanic , R Waddell , K. P Cantor , A Schned , N Rothman , J Lubin , J. F Fraumeni , R. N Hoover , K. T Kelsey and D. T. Silverman
  Background

Cigarette smoking is a well-established risk factor for bladder cancer. The effects of smoking duration, intensity (cigarettes per day), and total exposure (pack-years); smoking cessation; exposure to environmental tobacco smoke; and changes in the composition of tobacco and cigarette design over time on risk of bladder cancer are unclear.

Methods

We examined bladder cancer risk in relation to smoking practices based on interview data from a large, population-based case–control study conducted in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont from 2001 to 2004 (N = 1170 urothelial carcinoma case patients and 1413 control subjects). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using unconditional logistic regression. To examine changes in smoking-induced bladder cancer risk over time, we compared odds ratios from New Hampshire residents in this study (305 case patients and 335 control subjects) with those from two case–control studies conducted in New Hampshire in 1994–1998 and in 1998–2001 (843 case patients and 1183 control subjects).

Results

Regular and current cigarette smokers had higher risks of bladder cancer than never-smokers (for regular smokers, OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 2.4 to 3.6; for current smokers, OR = 5.2, 95% CI = 4.0 to 6.6). In New Hampshire, there was a statistically significant increasing trend in smoking-related bladder cancer risk over three consecutive periods (1994–1998, 1998–2001, and 2002–2004) among former smokers (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0 to 2.0; OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4 to 2.9; and OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.7 to 4.0, respectively) and current smokers (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 2.0 to 4.2; OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 2.8 to 6.3; OR = 5.5, 95% CI = 3.5 to 8.9, respectively) (P for homogeneity of trends over time periods = .04). We also observed that within categories of intensity, odds ratios increased approximately linearly with increasing pack-years smoked, but the slope of the increasing trend declined with increasing intensity.

Conclusions

Smoking-related risks of bladder cancer appear to have increased in New Hampshire since the mid-1990s. Based on our modeling of pack-years and intensity, smoking fewer cigarettes over a long time appears more harmful than smoking more cigarettes over a shorter time, for equal total pack-years of cigarettes smoked.

  T Truong , R. J Hung , C. I Amos , X Wu , H Bickeboller , A Rosenberger , W Sauter , T Illig , H. E Wichmann , A Risch , H Dienemann , R Kaaks , P Yang , R Jiang , J. K Wiencke , M Wrensch , H Hansen , K. T Kelsey , K Matsuo , K Tajima , A. G Schwartz , A Wenzlaff , A Seow , C Ying , A Staratschek Jox , P Nurnberg , E Stoelben , J Wolf , P Lazarus , J. E Muscat , C. J Gallagher , S Zienolddiny , A Haugen , H. F. M van der Heijden , L. A Kiemeney , D Isla , J. I Mayordomo , T Rafnar , K Stefansson , Z. F Zhang , S. C Chang , J. H Kim , Y. C Hong , E. J Duell , A. S Andrew , F Lejbkowicz , G Rennert , H Muller , H Brenner , L Le Marchand , S Benhamou , C Bouchardy , M. D Teare , X Xue , J McLaughlin , G Liu , J. D McKay , P Brennan and M. R. Spitz
  Background

Genome-wide association studies have identified three chromosomal regions at 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21 as being associated with the risk of lung cancer. To confirm these associations in independent studies and investigate heterogeneity of these associations within specific subgroups, we conducted a coordinated genotyping study within the International Lung Cancer Consortium based on independent studies that were not included in previous genome-wide association studies.

Methods

Genotype data for single-nucleotide polymorphisms at chromosomes 15q25 (rs16969968, rs8034191), 5p15 (rs2736100, rs402710), and 6p21 (rs2256543, rs4324798) from 21 case–control studies for 11 645 lung cancer case patients and 14 954 control subjects, of whom 85% were white and 15% were Asian, were pooled. Associations between the variants and the risk of lung cancer were estimated by logistic regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Associations between 15q25 and the risk of lung cancer were replicated in white ever-smokers (rs16969968: odds ratio [OR] = 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21 to 1.32, Ptrend = 2 x 10–26), and this association was stronger for those diagnosed at younger ages. There was no association in never-smokers or in Asians between either of the 15q25 variants and the risk of lung cancer. For the chromosome 5p15 region, we confirmed statistically significant associations in whites for both rs2736100 (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.20, Ptrend = 1 x 10–10) and rs402710 (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.19, Ptrend = 5 x 10–8) and identified similar associations in Asians (rs2736100: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.35, Ptrend = 2 x 10–5; rs402710: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.27, Ptrend = .007). The associations between the 5p15 variants and lung cancer differed by histology; odds ratios for rs2736100 were highest in adenocarcinoma and for rs402710 were highest in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas. This pattern was observed in both ethnic groups. Neither of the two variants on chromosome 6p21 was associated with the risk of lung cancer.

Conclusions

In this international genetic association study of lung cancer, previous associations found in white populations were replicated and new associations were identified in Asian populations. Future genetic studies of lung cancer should include detailed stratification by histology.

  A. S Andrew , R. A Mason , V Memoli and E. J. Duell
 

Arsenic is an established lung carcinogen, however, the carcinogenic mechanisms are currently under investigation. Phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been reported with arsenic exposure in bladder cells. EGFR is a tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor that regulates important processes in carcinogenesis, including cell survival, cell cycle progression, tumor invasion, and angiogenesis. We investigated the mechanisms of EGFR pathway activation by levels of arsenic relevant to human exposure scenarios both in vitro using cultured lung epithelial cells, and in lung tumors samples from New England Lung Cancer Study participants. Toenail arsenic levels were used as an internal biomarker of arsenic exposure. Our in vitro data suggest that arsenic increases levels of the EGFR ligand, heparin binding-EGF, and activate EGFR phosphorylation in the lung. Downstream of EGFR, arsenic exposure increased pERK and cyclin D1 levels. These effects were inhibited by treatment of cultured cells with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tarceva (erlotinib). In a consecutive series of human lung tumor specimens, pEGFR protein levels were higher in subjects with elevated toenail arsenic levels compared to those with low exposure (odds ratio adjusted for other factors, OR 4.1 (95% confidence interval 1.1–15.6) (p = 0.04). These data suggest that arsenic exposure may stimulate EGFR pathway activation in the lung. Moreover, the tumors that arise in arsenic-exposed individuals also exhibit signs of EGFR pathway dysregulation. Further work is needed to assess the clinical utility of targeting the EGFR pathway in subgroups of lung cancer patients who have been exposed to elevated levels of arsenic.

 
 
 
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