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Articles by A. M Lincoff
Total Records ( 2 ) for A. M Lincoff
  J. S Berger , D. L Bhatt , S. R Steinhubl , M Shao , P. G Steg , G Montalescot , W Hacke , K. A Fox , A. M Lincoff , E. J Topol , P. B Berger and Management for the CHARISMA (Clopidogrel for High Atherothrombotic Risk and Ischemic Stabilization
 

Background— Smoking increases platelet aggregability and the degree of platelet inhibition by clopidogrel on ex vivo platelet function tests. Whether smoking status affects the relationship between clopidogrel and clinical outcomes is unknown.

Methods and Results— We evaluated the relationship between smoking status (current smoker, former smoker, or never-smoker) and treatment with clopidogrel on the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality among the 12 152 participants from the CHARISMA (Clopidogrel for High Atherothrombotic Risk and Ischemic Stabilization, Management, and Avoidance) trial who had established cardiovascular disease. Current smoking was associated with an increase in all-cause (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.85 to 3.60), cardiovascular (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.48 to 3.45), and cancer (HR 3.56, 95% CI 1.96 to 6.46) mortality compared with never smoking. The impact of clopidogrel on mortality differed by smoking status (P for interaction=0.018 for current smokers). Among current smokers, clopidogrel was associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.94); clopidogrel did not reduce all-cause mortality among former smokers (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.19) or never-smokers (HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.58). A similar pattern was noted for cardiovascular mortality. As expected, no relationship was observed between clopidogrel and cancer mortality by smoking status. The risk of bleeding appeared to differ according to smoking status; randomized clopidogrel was associated with a significantly increased risk of severe or moderate bleeding (HR 1.62, P=0.04) among current smokers but a smaller and nonsignificant increase among never-smokers (HR 1.31, P=0.15).

Conclusions— Clopidogrel therapy may be more effective in current smokers, but it may also confer a greater bleeding risk than in nonsmokers. Further studies are needed to investigate this possibility.

  S. J Pocock , R Mehran , T. C Clayton , E Nikolsky , H Parise , M Fahy , A. J Lansky , M. E Bertrand , A. M Lincoff , J. W Moses , E. M Ohman , H. D White and G. W. Stone
 

Background— Both ischemic and hemorrhagic complications increase mortality rate in acute coronary syndromes. Their frequency and relative importance vary according to individual patient risk profiles. We sought to develop prognostic models for the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and major bleeding to assess their impact on risk of death and to examine the manner in which alternative antithrombotic regimens affect these risks in individual patients.

Methods and Results— The Acute Catheterization and Urgent Intervention Triage Strategy (ACUITY) trial randomized 13 819 patients with acute coronary syndrome to heparin plus a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, bivalirudin plus a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor, or bivalirudin alone. By logistic regression, there were 5 independent predictors of MI within 30 days (n=705; 5.1%) and 8 independent predictors of major bleeding (n=645; 4.7%), only 2 of which were common to both event types. In a covariate-adjusted, time-updated Cox regression model, both MI and major bleeding significantly affected subsequent mortality rate (hazard ratios, 2.7 and 2.9, respectively; both P<0.001). Treatment with bivalirudin versus heparin plus a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor was associated with a nonsignificant 8% increase in MI and a highly significant 50% decrease in major bleeding. Given the individual patient risk profiles and the fact that bivalirudin prevented 6 major bleeds for each MI that might occur from its use, the estimated reduction in bleeding was greater than the estimated increase in MI by bivalirudin alone rather than heparin plus a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor for nearly all patients.

Conclusions— Consideration of the individual patient risk profile for MI and major bleeding and the relative treatment effects of alternative pharmacotherapies permits personalized decision making to optimize therapy of patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Clinical Trial Registration— clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00093158.

 
 
 
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