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Articles by A. L Borresen Dale
Total Records ( 3 ) for A. L Borresen Dale
  R Agarwal , A. M Gonzalez Angulo , S Myhre , M Carey , J. S Lee , J Overgaard , J Alsner , K Stemke Hale , A Lluch , R. M Neve , W. L Kuo , T Sorlie , A Sahin , V Valero , K Keyomarsi , J. W Gray , A. L Borresen Dale , G. B Mills and B. T. Hennessy
 

Purpose: We studied the expression levels of cyclins B1, D1, and E1 and the implications of cyclin overexpression for patient outcomes in distinct breast cancer subtypes defined by clinical variables and transcriptional profiling.

Experimental Design: The expression levels of cyclins B1, D1, and E1 were quantified in 779 breast tumors and 53 cell lines using reverse phase protein arrays and/or transcriptional profiling.

Results: Whereas cyclin E1 overexpression was a specific marker of triple-negative and basal-like tumors, cyclin B1 overexpression occurred in poor prognosis hormone receptor–positive, luminal B and basal-like breast cancers. Cyclin D1 overexpression occurred in luminal and normal-like cancers. Breast cancer subgroups defined by integrated expression of cyclins B1, D1, and E1 correlated significantly (P < 0.000001) with tumor subtypes defined by transcriptional profiling and clinical criteria. Across three hormone receptor–positive data sets, cyclin B1 was the dominant cyclin associated with poor prognosis in univariate and multivariate analyses. Although CCNE1 was present in significantly higher copy numbers in basal-like versus other subtypes (ANOVA P < 0.001), CCNB1 gene copy number did not show gain in breast cancer. Instead, cyclin B1 expression was increased in tumors with co-occurrence of TP53 mutations and MYC amplification, a combination that seems to characterize basal-like and luminal B tumors. CCNB1 gene expression was significantly correlated with PLK, CENPE, and AURKB gene expression.

Conclusion: Cyclins B1, D1, and E1 have distinct expressions in different breast cancer subtypes. Novel PLK, CENPE, and AURKB inhibitors should be assessed for therapeutic utility in poor prognosis cyclin B1–overexpressing breast cancers.

  S. A Glynn , B. J Boersma , T. M Howe , H Edvardsen , S. B Geisler , J. E Goodman , L. A Ridnour , P. E Lonning , A. L Borresen Dale , B Naume , V. N Kristensen , S. J Chanock , D. A Wink and S. Ambs
 

Purpose: Manganese superoxide dismutase protects against oxidative damage and modulates the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. A functional single-nucleotide polymorphism in codon 16 of SOD2 (rs4880), which encodes manganese superoxide dismutase, results in a substitution of valine by alanine (Val16Ala). We hypothesized that this single-nucleotide polymorphism affects breast cancer survival of patients receiving chemotherapy.

Experimental Design: Two patient populations from the United States (n = 248) and Norway (n = 340) were genotyped for Val16Ala. Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between Val16Ala and disease-specific survival.

Results: Val16Ala was significantly associated with breast cancer outcome in both patient populations. Carriers of the Ala allele had inferior survival rates in the multivariate analysis [hazard ratio (HR), 2.44 and 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.11-5.37 in U.S. cohort; HR, 1.91 and 95% CI, 1.06-3.45 in Norway cohort for Ala/Ala versus Val/Val]. In an analysis of the combined cohorts, this association was significant for patients receiving adjuvant therapy (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.46-4.19), but not for patients without it (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 0.57-3.74). After further stratification by type of chemotherapy, the effect of the Ala allele was mostly restricted to cyclophosphamide-containing chemotherapy regimens (HR, 22.0; 95% CI, 5.22-92.9; Ala/Ala versus Val/Val).

Conclusion: The Val16Ala polymorphism affects survival of patients receiving cyclophosphamide-containing chemotherapy. The findings provide the first evidence pointing toward a mechanism for cyclophosphamide resistance in breast cancer patients.

  J. L Bernstein , R. W Haile , M Stovall , J. D Boice , R. E Shore , B Langholz , D. C Thomas , L Bernstein , C. F Lynch , J. H Olsen , K. E Malone , L Mellemkjaer , A. L Borresen Dale , B. S Rosenstein , S. N Teraoka , A. T Diep , S. A Smith , M Capanu , A. S Reiner , X Liang , R. A Gatti , P Concannon and and the WECARE Study Collaborative Group
  Background

Ionizing radiation is a known mutagen and an established breast carcinogen. The ATM gene is a key regulator of cellular responses to the DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. We investigated whether genetic variants in ATM play a clinically significant role in radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in women.

Methods

The Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology Study is an international population-based case–control study nested within a cohort of 52 536 survivors of unilateral breast cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 2000. The 708 case subjects were women with contralateral breast cancer, and the 1397 control subjects were women with unilateral breast cancer matched to the case subjects on age, follow-up time, registry reporting region, and race and/or ethnicity. All women were interviewed and underwent full mutation screening of the entire ATM gene. Complete medical treatment history information was collected, and for all women who received radiotherapy, the radiation dose to the contralateral breast was reconstructed using radiotherapy records and radiation measurements. Rate ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by using multivariable conditional logistic regression. All P values are two-sided.

Results

Among women who carried a rare ATM missense variant (ie, one carried by <1% of the study participants) that was predicted to be deleterious, those who were exposed to radiation (mean radiation exposure = 1.2 Gy, SD = 0.7) had a statistically significantly higher risk of contralateral breast cancer compared with unexposed women who carried the wild-type genotype (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2 to 6.5; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.4 to 8.0) or compared with unexposed women who carried the same predicted deleterious missense variant (0.01–0.99 Gy: RR = 5.3, 95% CI = 1.6 to 17.3; ≥1.0 Gy: RR = 5.8, 95% CI = 1.8 to 19.0; Ptrend = .044).

Conclusions

Women who carry rare deleterious ATM missense variants and who are treated with radiation may have an elevated risk of developing contralateral breast cancer. However, the rarity of these deleterious missense variants in human populations implies that ATM mutations could account for only a small portion of second primary breast cancers.

 
 
 
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